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Full text of "School of Dentistry Catalog 1972-1974, 1976-1988"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/schooldent72unse 






§m DENTISTRY 




ULLETIN 
972/74 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



Students of all races, colors and creeds are equally admis- 
sible to the School of Dentistry. It is the objective of the 
School to enroll students with diversified backgrounds in 
order to make the educational experience more meaningful 
for each individual as well as to provide dental health prac- 
titioners to all segments of the community. 



The University of Maryland has been elected to membership in the Association of 
American Universities. This Association founded in 1900, is an organization of those uni- 
versities in the United States and Canada generally considered to be preeminent in the 
fields of graduate and professional study and research. 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within 
the student's term of residence. The University further reserves the right, at any time, to ask a student to withdraw 
when it considers such action to be in the best interests of the University. 



1972-74 Bulletin 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY, 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF 

DENTAL SURGERY 






FIRST DENTAL SCHOOL 



THE BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY, 
THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY OF THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND* WAS FOUNDED MARCH 6. 1840, UNDER 
THE LEADERSHIP OF DOCTORS HORACE H. HAYDEN 
AND CHAPIN H. HARRIS. IT IS THE FIRST DENTAL 
SCHOOL IN THE WORLD. 

DENTISTRY IS THE ONLY DISCIPLINE IN 
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION ORIGINATING IN 
THE UNITED STATES. GRADUATES OF THE SCHOOL 
NUMBER IN THE THOUSANDS AND INCLUDE LEADERS 
IN DENTAL EDUCATION. RESEARCH AND ORGANIZED 
DENTISTRY. INITIALLY THE SCHOOL WAS HOUSED AT A 
SITE SIX BLOCKS TO THE EAST IN HOPKINS PLAZA. 

MARYLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



School of Dentistry/ 3 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Statement of Philosophy 4 

SECTION I— GENERAL INFORMATION 

The School 5 

The Campus 6 

The Health Sciences Library 7 

Division of Educational and 

Instructional Resources 7 

Tuition and Fees 

Dental Program 8 

Graduate Program 8 

Postgraduate Program 8 

Dental Hygiene Program 9 

Explanation of Fees 9 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 10 

Registration 10 

Definition of Residence and 

Non-Residence 10 

Student Health Service 11 

Baltimore Union 11 

SECTION II— THE DENTAL PROGRAM 

Requirements for Admission 12 

Combined Arts and Sciences- 
Dental Program 12 

Arts-Dentistry Curriculum 13 

Requirements for Enrollment and 

Matriculation 14 

Application Procedures 14 

Admission with Advanced Standing . 14 

Academic Policies 15 

Equipment and Supplies 15 

Requirements for Graduation 15 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 16 

Special Lecture Funds 17 

Plan of Curriculum 18 

Course Descriptions 20 



SECTION III— ADVANCED EDUCATION 
PROGRAMS 

Postgraduate Education 31 

Endodontics 31 

Oral Surgery 32 

Orthodontics 32 

Pedodontics 33 

Periodontics 34 

Prosthodontics 34 

Continuing Education 34 



SECTION IV— DENTAL HYGIENE 
PROGRAM 

Preprofessional Course Outline 35 

Admissions and Application Procedures 38 

Graduation Requirements 39 

Financial Assistance 39 

Housing 41 

Course Descriptions 41 

SECTION V— ORGANIZATIONS 

Board of Regents 45 

University of Maryland Central 

Administration 45 

Officers of the University of Maryland 

at Baltimore 45 

Officers for Central and Administrative 

Services, University of Maryland 

at Baltimore 46 

Faculty of School of Dentistry 46 

Alumni Association 54 

Deans of Dental Schools in Baltimore 56 

Campus Map and Description 58 




STATEMENT OF 
PHILOSOPHY 

Dentistry as a health service has demon- 
strated a variety of achievements since its 
birth as a profession in 1840. Not the least 
of these have been technical excellence in 
clinical procedures and an improved un- 
derstanding of human biology. In the lat- 
ter half of the twentieth century the 
profession has responded to a call for in- 
creased social awareness. As a university 
discipline dental education must meet and 
surpass its previous accomplishments in 
the continuing evolution of dental science. 
Also, as a part of a modern university, 
the School of Dentistry must keep its pro- 



grams focused on the three basic aims of 
the academic community — teaching, re- 
search and service. 

The process of education, whether it be 
in dentistry, engineering, law, medicine, 
business administration or theology, is a 
dynamic and changing force which often 
presents a paradoxical profile. While it 
must remain anchored firmly to time- 
tested principles, it must also continually 
extend itself to uncover hidden truths within 
these same principles and thereby contribute 
to man's progress toward better understand- 
ing and control of his environment. 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



THE SCHOOL 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
the School of Dentistry of the University of 
Maryland at Baltimore, occupies an impor- 
tant and unique place in the heritage of 
dentistry in that it represents the first ef- 
fort in history to offer institutional dental 
education to those anticipating the prac- 
tice of dentistry. At the end of the 
1971-72 academic session the School of 
Dentistry completed its one hundred and 
thirty-second year of service to dental edu- 
cation and increased its number of grad- 
uates to better than 9,800. 

The long and notable history of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery is 
replete with many names of great promi- 
nence in the affairs of dentistry, but none 
transcends those of Horace H. Hayden and 
Chapin A. Harris. Dr. Horace H. Hayden, 
a native of Windsor, Connecticut, began 
the practice of dentistry in Baltimore in 
1800. From that time to his death in 1844 
he made a zealous attempt to lay the foun- 
dation for a scientific and serviceable den- 
tal profession. In 1831 Dr. Chapin A. 
Harris came to Baltimore from Greenfield, 
Ohio to study under Hayden. Dr. Harris 
was a man of unusual ability and possessed 
special qualifications to aid in establishing 
and promoting formal dental education. 

The first lectures on dentistry in the 
United States were delivered by Dr. 
Horace H. Hayden at the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine between the 



years 1823 and 1825. These lectures were 
interrupted in 1825 by internal dissensions 
in the School of Medicine, however, and, 
as a consequence, were discontinued. It 
was Dr. Hayden's idea that dental educa- 
tion merited greater attention than had 
been given it by medicine or could be 
given it by the preceptorial plan of dental 
teaching then in vogue. Since Dr. Hayden's 
lectures had been interrupted at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, and since there was 
an apparent unsurmountable difficulty con- 
fronting the creation of dental depart- 
ments in medical schools, an independent 
dental college was decided upon. A char- 
ter was applied for and on February 1, 
1840 was granted by the General Assembly 
of Maryland. The first Faculty meeting was 
held February 3, 1840, at which time Dr. 
Horace H. Hayden was elected President 
and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, Dean. The 
introductory lecture was delivered by Dr. 
Hayden on November 3, 1840, to the first 
students matriculating in the first class. 
Thus was created as the foundation of the 
present dental profession the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, the first dental 
school in the world. 

The founding of conventional dental 
education was not the only contribution of 
Hayden and Harris. In 1839 the predeces- 
sor of the Journal of the American Dental 
Association, the American Journal of Den- 
tal Science, was founded with Chapin A. 



S/University of Maryland 



Harris as editor. Dr. Harris continued fully 
responsible for dentistry's initial venture 
into periodic scientific literature to the 
time of his death in 1860. The files of the 
old American Journal of Dental Science 
testify to the fine contributions made by 
Dr. Harris. In 1840 the American Society 
of Dental Surgeons was founded with Dr. 
Horace H. Hayden as its President and 
Dr. Chapin A. Harris as its Corresponding 
Secretary. This was the beginning of orga- 
nized dentistry in America, and was the 
forerunner of the American Dental Associ- 
ation, which numbers approximately one 
hundred twelve thousand in its present 
membership. The foregoing suggests the 
unusual influence Baltimore dentists and 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
have exercised on the continuing growth 
and development of the dental profession. 

In 1873, the Maryland Dental College, 
an offspring of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, was organized. It contin- 
ued instruction until 1878, at which time it 
was consolidated with the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery. A department of 
dentistry was organized at the University 
of Maryland in the year 1882, graduating a 
class each year from 1883 to 1923. The 
school was chartered as a corporation and 
continued as a privately owned and di- 
rected institution until 1920, when it 
became a State institution. The Dental 
Department of the Baltimore Medical Col- 
lege was established in 1895, continuing 
until 1913, when it merged with the Den- 
tal Department of the University of Mary- 
land. A final combining of the dental 
educational interests of Baltimore into one 
institution was accomplished on June 15, 
1923 by the amalgamation of the student 
bodies of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery and the University of Maryland 
School of Dentistry, the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery becoming a distinct 
department of the University under State 
supervision and control. 

As the dental profession has changed its 



methods of delivery of dental health serv- 
ices to include greater reliance on dental 
specialists and dental auxiliaries, the 
School of Dentistry has made continuing 
efforts to provide appropriate educational 
and training opportunities. In 1964 an in- 
ternship-residency program in oral surgery 
in conjunction with the University of Mar- 
yland Hospital was approved and has 
since expanded through affiliations with 
Baltimore City Hospitals, Mercy Hospital, 
Provident Hospital and St. Agnes Hospital. 
In 1968 an internship-residency program in 
pedodontics was initiated involving the 
School of Dentistry, The Children's Hospi- 
tal of Baltimore and the Community 
Pediatric Center of the School of Medicine. 
In 1970 postgraduate programs were insti- 
tuted in the School of Dentistry for the 
specialty areas of endodontics, orthodon- 
tics, periodontics and prosthodontics. 

Likewise in 1970 a baccalaureate degree 
program in dental hygiene was begun by 
the School of Dentistry. This program, the 
first and only one of its kind in Maryland, 
is designed to prepare individuals for 
careers in dental hygiene practice, dental 
hygiene education and other areas of inter- 
est to this important dental auxiliary field. 

The preceding summary of the School's 
origin and its contributions to the art and 
science of dentistry offers ample evidence 
of the extraordinary place the School occu- 
pies in the history of the dental profession. 
It also suggests a strong and continuing 
commitment to excellence in the promo- 
tion of learning and public responsibility. 

THE CAMPUS 

The School of Dentistry is located on the 
campus of the University of Maryland at 
Baltimore in the heart of metropolitan 
Baltimore. Major units of this campus in 
addition to the School of Dentistry are the 
Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, Phar- 
macy and Social Work and Community 
Planning, and the University of Maryland 



School of Dentistry/ 7 



Hospital. These professional schools and 
their accompanying service programs rep- 
resent a significant resource in the health 
and welfare of the community. The com- 
munity, in turn, reciprocates as a resource 
for the University through support and 
utilization of health and other services by 
its citizens. The City of Baltimore is one of 
the important commercial, cultural and sci- 
entific centers in the Eastern United States, 
and offers unlimited extracurricular activ- 
ities to students and visitors. 

THE HEALTH SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 

This school is fortunate in having one of 
the better equipped and organized librar- 
ies among the dental schools of the coun- 
try. The dental collection is part of the 
Health Sciences Library, which includes 
also medicine, nursing, pharmacy and 
social work with more than 146,700 bound 
volumes and over 2,850 current subscrip- 
tions to scientific periodicals. A four-story 
library building at 111 South Greene 
Street provides study space to suit individ- 
ual needs. A well-qualified staff of profes- 
sionally trained and certified librarians 
promotes the services of the library and 
assists the student body in the use of 
library resources. One of the most impor- 
tant factors of the dental student's educa- 
tion is to teach him the value and the use 
of dental literature in his formal education, 
thus promoting his usefulness and value to 
the profession during practice. The School 
of Dentistry is ideally equipped to achieve 
this aim of dental education. 

DIVISION OF 
EDUCATIONAL AND 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
RESOURCES 

This division is composed of an Independ- 
ent Learning Center, closed-circuit color 



television system, and artistic and photo- 
graphic support. 

Approximately 2,000 square feet of 
space is devoted to the Independent 
Learning Center. Within the Center, 1,200 
square feet is appropriated to house 50 
study carrels, specifically for the use of 
self-instructional media. The Independent 
Learning Center, available for utilization 
from morning through early evening hours, 
provides an environment where students 
may study self-instructional materials in a 
variety of media and on levels designed to 
allow students to cover, by independent 
study, the information conventionally in- 
cluded in dental courses. 

A closed-circuit color television system 
distributes programs to approximately 100 
monitors located in various parts of the 
building. This television system is capable 
of distributing five (5) different programs 
simultaneously to any of the reception 
areas. A modern, well-equipped studio and 
control room enable high quality distribu- 
tion of instruction throughout the School. 

All faculty members have access to artis- 
tic and photographic assistance, provided 
through this division, for the preparation of 
self-instructional materials and other large 
and small group lectures and demonstra- 
tions. 




8/ University of Maryland 



DENTAL PROGRAM 



TUITION AND FEES 



Application Fee 
Matriculation Fee 
Tuition — Resident 
Tuition — Non-Resident 
Instructional Resources Fee 
Student Activities Fee 
Student Health Fee 
Hospital Insurance ( Indiv. ) 
Graduation Fee — 4th Year 
Supporting Facilities Fee 
Dormitory Fee 



Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


Total 




$ 


$ 


$ 15.00 


15.00 






15.00 


320.00 


320.00 


320.00 


960.00 


660.00 


655.00 


655.00 


1,970.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


30.00 


8.00 


6.00 


6.00 


20.00 


4.00 


3.00 


3.00 


10.00 


46.80 




46.80 


93.60 






15.00 


15.00 


20.00 


20.00 


20.00 


60.00 


165.00 


155.00 


155.00 


475.00 



GRADUATE PROGRAM 



Application Fee 






15.00 


Matriculation Fee 


15.00 


15.00 


— 


Tuition — Per Credit 








Residents 


43.00* 


43.00 


— 


Xon-Residents 


59.00° 


59.00 


— 


Continuous Registration Fee 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


Student Health Fee ( full-time ) 


5.00 


5.00 


10.00 


Student Health Fee (part-time) 


2.00 


2.00 


4.00 


Hospital Insurance 








( full-time ) — optional 


46.80 


46.80 


93.60 


Dormitory Fee 


237.50 


237.50 


475.00 


Graduation Fee — Masters Degree 


15.00 


15.00 


15.00f 


Graduation Fee — Doctor Degree 


60.00 


60.00 


60.00 


Supporting Facilities Fee ( full-time ) 


30.00 


30.00 


60.00 


Supporting Facilities Fee ( part-time ) 


6.00 


6.00 


12.00 



$1.00 per credit hour to be distributed to Auxiliary Fees, 
t 1 time fee. 



POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM 




Application Fee 


15.00 


Tuition — Resident 


600.00 


Tuition — Non-Resident 


900.00 


Student Health Fee 


5.00 


Instructional Resources Fee 


15.00 


Hospital Insurance ( Indiv. ) 


46.80 


Student Activities Fee 


10.00 


Supporting Facilities Fee 


30.00 





15.00 


600.00 


1,200.00 


900.00 


1,800.00 


5.00 


10.00 


15.00 


30.00 


46.80 


93.60 


10.00 


20.00 


30.00 


60.00 



School of Dentistry/9 



Fall Winter Spring 


Total 


$ $ 


$ 


$ 15.00 


15.00 




15.00 


275.00 


275.00 


550.00 


775.00 


775.00 


1550.00 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


5.00 


5.00 


10.00 


237.50 


237.50 


475.00 


46.80 


46.80 


93.60 




15.00 


15.00 


15.00 


15.00 


30.00 


30.00 


30.00 


60.00 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM 

Application Fee 
Matriculation Fee 
Tuition — Resident 
Tuition — Non-Resident 
Student Activities Fee 
Student Health Fee 
Dormitory Fee 
Hospital Insurance (Indiv.) 
Graduation Fee — Seniors 
Instructional Resources Fee 
Supporting Facilities Fee 

EXPLANATION OF FEES 

The Application and/or Matriculation Fee partially defrays the cost of processing applications for 
admission and enrollment data in the professional schools. These are not refundable. The Application Fee 
will be applied against the Matriculation Fee for accepted students. 

The Continuous Registration Fee is applicable to students who have been advanced to candidacy and 
who have completed required credit hours, but who have not completed the thesis or dissertation. 

The Student Health Fee is charged to help defray the cost of providing a Student Health Service. This 
service includes routine examinations and emergency care. Acceptable medical insurance is required in 
addition to the Student Health Fee. 

Hospital Insurance is required of all full-time students. A brief outline of the Student Health Insurance 
Program is furnished each student. Students with equivalent insurance coverage must provide proof of 
such coverage to his Dean at the time of registration and obtain a Hospital Insurance Waiver. 

The Diploma Fee is charged to help defray costs involved with graduation and commencement. 

The Instructional Resources Fee is charged to provide supplies, materials, equipment, and other costs 
directly associated with the instructional program. 

The Student Activities Fee is used to meet the costs for various student activities, student publications 
and cultural programs. The Student Government Association, in each of the Schools that has a Student 
Activities Fee, in cooperation with the Dean's Office of the School, recommends expenditure of the fee 
collected. 

The Supporting Facilities Fee is used for expansion of various campus facilities that are not funded or 
are funded only in part from other sources. 

Fixed Charges Fee is a charge to meet a part of the costs for the educational program and supporting 
services. 

• A service charge is assessed for dishonored checks and is payable for each check which is returned 
unpaid by the drawee bank on initial presentation because of insufficient funds, payment stopped, 
postdating, drawn against uncollected items, etc. 

For checks up to $50.00 $ 5.00 

For checks from $50.01 to $100.00 $10.00 

For checks over $100.00 $20.00 

• The Late Registration Fee is charged to defray the cost of the special handling involved for those 
who do not complete their registration on the prescribed days. 

• No degree will be conferred, nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript of record issued to a student 
who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 

• The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other charges as may be necessary. 



10/ University of Maryland 



WITHDRAWAL AND 
REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the School 
at any time during the academic year 
should file a written request for withdrawal 
with the Office of the Dean. If this is not 
done, the student will not be entitled to an 
honorable dismissal, and will forfeit his 
right to any refund to which he would 
otherwise be entitled. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will 
be permitted only with the written consent 
of the student's parent or guardian. 

Students withdrawing from the School 
will be credited for all fees charged to 
them except the Application Fee, the 
Enrollment Deposit, the Matriculation 
Fee, and the Student Activities Fee in 
accordance with the following schedule: 
Period from Date Refund- 

Instruction Begins able 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 
Between three an dfour weeks 40% 
Between four and five weeks 20% 
Over five weeks 

REGISTRATION 

The registration of a student in any school 
or college of the University shall be re- 
garded as a registration in the University 
of Maryland, but when such student trans- 
fers to a professional school of the Univer- 
sity or from one professional school to 
another, he must pay the usual matricula- 
tion fee required by each professional 
school. 

Each student is required to fill in a regis- 
tration card for the office of the Registrar, 
and make payment of one-half of the tui- 
tion fee in addition to all other fees noted 
as payable before being admitted to class- 
work at the opening of the session. The 
remainder of tuition and fees must be in 
the hands of the Comptroller during regis- 
tration period for the second half of the 
academic year. 



DEFINITION OF 
RESIDENCE AND 
NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to 
be resident students if at the time of their 
registration their parents have been domi- 
ciled in the State of Maryland for at least 
six months. 

The status of the residence of a minor is 
determined at the time of his first registra- 
tion in the University and may not there- 
after be changed by him unless his parents 
move to and become legal residents of 
Maryland by maintaining such residence 
for at least six months. However, the right 
of the minor student to change from a non- 
resident status to resident status must be 
established by his parents or legal guardian 
prior to the registration period set for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be 
residents if at the time of their registration 
they have been domiciled in Maryland for 
at least six months provided such resi- 
dence has not been acquired while attend- 
ing any school or college in Maryland or 
elsewhere. An adult may change his status 
from non-resident to resident by withdraw- 
ing from the University for six months and 
remaining in the state as a civilian not 
enrolled in any other institution for more 
than eight semester hours of credit. Time 
spent on active duty in the armed services 
while stationed in Maryland will not be 
considered as satisfying the six-months 
period referred to above unless the indi- 
vidual's home of record on his official 
military records is the State of Maryland. 
In the case of both military personnel and 
adults, residence may be established 
through ownership and maintenance of a 
home in the state which is the student's 
primary place of domicile. 

Procedures are available for reviewing 
the residence status of students. Individ- 
uals seeking to appeal the decisions con- 



School of Dentistry /ll 



cerning their residence status should 
contact the Office of Admissions. 

The word "domicile" as used in this 
regulation shall mean the permanent place 
of abode. For the purpose of this rule only 
one domicile may be maintained. 



STUDENT HEALTH 
SERVICE 

The School undertakes to provide medical 
care for its students through the Student 
Health Service, located in Room 145, first 
floor of Howard Hall, 685 W. Baltimore 
Street. The office is staffed by a Director, 
Assistant Director, two full-time internists, 
a full-time psychiatrist, a full-time gynecol- 
ogist, and three registered nurses. 

All students are required to have Blue 
Cross hospitalization insurance or its equiv- 
alent and each student must produce 
certified proof of such membership at the 
time of registration. A special Blue-Cross- 
Blue-Shield student policy is available to 
all students enrolling in the School. De- 
tailed information regarding the provisions 
of the student policy may be obtained 
from the Student Health Office. 

The Student Health Office provides each 
new student with a physical examination, 
tuberculin skin test and chest X-ray as 
scheduled by the School. In addition, each 
new student is required to undergo an oral 
diagnosis examination by the School; any 
defects noted must be corrected within the 
first school year. The passing of this exam- 
ination is a requirement for the final 
acceptance of any student. 

Prospective students are advised to have 
any known physical defects corrected 
before entering the school in order to pre- 
vent loss of time which later correction 
might involve. 

The School does not accept responsibil- 
ity for illness or accident occurring away 
from the community, or for expenses in- 



curred for hospitalization or medical serv- 
ices not authorized by the Student Health 
Service. 



BALTIMORE UNION 

The Baltimore Union for students of the 
professional schools is located adjacent to 
the professional schools at 621 West Lom- 
bard Street. Accommodations for both men 
and women are provided in a five-story 
semi-air conditioned building which also 
contains a cafeteria, fountain lounge, meet- 
ing rooms, laundry facilities, game room, 
bookstore, and lounges on each floor. Dou- 
ble rooms only are available. The rental 
agreement is made for rooms only; meals 
are served cafeteria style on a cash basis. 
The contract for accommodations covers 
the academic years. The charge for each 
student in a double room is $215.00 per 
semester. 

The room rate includes the following 
room furnishings: bed and cover, mattress, 
chest of drawers, closet, bookshelves, desk, 
medicine cabinet, desk chair and desk 
lamp. Telephone service is available 
through the Chesapeake & Potomac Tele- 
phone Company. Cost of the telephone is 
not included in the room rate. Information 
on the Baltimore Union and on private 
housing can be obtained from the Direc- 
tor's Office. Mail service is also provided. 

Towels and linens may be rented from 
the Gordon-Davis Linen Service or each 
resident may provide his own. A small 
amount of luggage space is available. Stor- 
age of anything other than luggage will 
not be available. 

Application forms may be secured from 
the Director's Office, The Baltimore Union, 
621 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, Mar- 
yland 21201. Rooms will be assigned only 
on receipt of an application form duly 
executed and accompanied by the required 
deposit. 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



REQUIREMENTS FOR 
ADMISSION 

Applicants for admission to the dental pro- 
gram must present evidence of having 
completed successfully three academic 
years of work in an accredited college of 
arts and sciences based upon the comple- 
tion of a four-year high school course or 
the equivalent in entrance examinations. 
The college course must include at least a 
years credit in English, in biology, in 
physics, in general or inorganic chemistry, 
and in organic chemistry. All required 
science courses shall include both class- 
room and laboratory instruction. Although 
a minimum of 90 semester hours of credit, 
exclusive of physical education and mili- 
tary science, is required, additional courses 
in the humanities and the natural and 
social sciences are desirable. By ruling of 
the Faculty Council, all admission require- 
ments must be completed by June 30 pre- 
vious to the desired date of admission. 

No more than 60 hours of the minimum 
required credits ivill be accepted from 
Junior Colleges, and then only if these 
credits are validated by an accredited Arts 
and Sciences College. 

In considering candidates for admission, 
the Committee on Admissions will give 
preference to those applicants who have 
high scholastic records in secondary school 
and in college; who make satisfactory 
scores in the dental admissions test; who 
present favorable recommendations from 
their respective pre-dental committee or 
from one instructor in each of the depart- 
ments of biology, chemistry, and the 
department of his choice; and who, in all 



other respects, give every promise of 
becoming successful students and dentists 
of high standing. Applicants will not be 
admitted with unabsolved conditions or 
unabsolved failures. 

COMBINED ARTS AND 

SCIENCES-DENTAL 

PROGRAM 

The University offers a combined arts 
and sciences-dental curriculum leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Science and 
Doctor of Dental Surgery. The preprofes- 
sional part of this curriculum may be taken 
in residence in the College of Arts and 
Sciences, and the professional part in the 
School of Dentistry in Baltimore. 

Students who select the combined pro- 
gram and who have completed the arts 
and sciences phase of it may, upon the 
recommendation of the Dean of the School 
of Dentistry, be granted the degree of 
Bachelor of Sciences by the College of 
Arts and Sciences at the first summer com- 
mencement following the completion of 
the student's first year in the School of 
Dentistry. A student may enter the arts 
and sciences-dental program at College 
Park with advanced standing from an 
accredited college or university, but the 
last year of the pre-professional training 
must be completed at College Park and the 
professional training must be completed in 
the School of Dentistry of the University of 
Maryland. 



School of Dentistry/ 13 

ARTS-DENTISTRY CURRICULUM 
FRESHMAN YEAR 

Engl Composition requirement 

Spch 100 or 107— Public Speaking 

Zool 101, 102 — General Zoology; Animal Phyla 

Chem 103, 104 or Chem 105, 106 College Chemistry 

or Principles of College Chemistry 
Math 110, 111 — Introduction to Mathematics 

or 
Math 115, 140 — Introductory Analysis 

or 
Math 140 — Analysis I 
Gen. Ed. Requirements 

Hlth — 140A Personal and Community Health 
Physical Activities 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Chem 201, 202, 203, 204 or 211, 212, 213, 214— 3-2 3-2 

College Chemistry or Principles of College Chemistry 

Zool 290 — Comparative Vertebrate Morphology 4 

Foreign Language as needed 3-4 3-4 

Gen Ed. requirements and electives 3-6 6-9 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Semester 


I 


II 




3 


3-2 




4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 






3-6 


(2) 


(2) 


14-16 


14-16 



15-18 15-18 



Physics 121, 122 — Fundamentals of Physics 4 4 

Foreign Language, General Education Requirements, 

Minor Courses Approved by Advisor, Electives 12-15 12-15 

16-19 16-19 
A course in statistics, e.g., PSYC 200 or SOCY 201, must be included. 

SENIOR YEAR 

The curriculum of the first year of the School of Dentistry of the University of Maryland 
is accepted by the College of Arts and Sciences as the fourth year (major sequence) of 
academic work toward the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

If at the end of the junior year the student decides to postpone his entrance to the 
School of Dentistry and to remain in the College of Arts and Sciences and complete work 
for the Bachelor's degree, he may choose a major and minor in any of the departments in 
which he has completed the necessary underclass requirements. The general nature of the 
first three years of this curriculum and the generous electives of the third year make possi- 
ble for the student a wide choice of departments in which he may specialize. In general the 
electives of the third year will be chosen as for a major in some particular department. 



14/ University of Maryland 



REQUIREMENTS FOR 
ENROLLMENT AND 
MATRICULATION 

In the selection of students to begin the 
study of dentistry the School considers par- 
ticularly a candidate's proved ability in 
secondary education and his successful 
completion of prescribed courses in pre- 
dental collegiate training. The require- 
ments for admission and the academic 
regulations of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, University of Maryland, are strictly 
adhered to by the School of Dentistry. 

A student must pay a deposit of $200.00 
when he accepts the offer of enrollment 
from the School of Dentistry. This deposit 
is intended to insure registration in the 
class and is not returnable. A matriculation 
fee of $15.00 is payable at the time of reg- 
istration. A student is not regarded as hav- 
ing matriculated in the School of Dentistry 
until such time as the fee has been paid. 



APPLICATION 
PROCEDURES 

Candidates seeking admission to the dental 
program should write to the Committee on 
Admissions requesting an application form. 
Each applicant should fill out the blank in 
its entirety and mail it promptly, together 
with the application fee, to the Committee 
on Admissions, School of Dentistry, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201. The Committee on Admissions will 
acknowledge promptly the receipt of the 
application. If this acknowledgement is 
not received within ten days, the applicant 
should contact the Committee immedi- 
ately. The early filing of an application is 
urged. Applications may be filed after 
June 1 of the year previous to the desired 
date of admission; early application is 
recommended. Applicants wishing advice 
on any problem relating to their predental 
training or their application should com- 



municate with the Committee on Admis- 
sions. 

All applicants will be required to take 
the Dental Admissions Test. This test will 
be given at various testing centers through- 
out the United States, its possessions and 
Canada. Applicants will be notified by the 
Council on Dental Education of the Amer- 
ican Dental Association of the dates of the 
tests and the locations of the testing 
centers. 

Candidates will be interviewed at the 
discretion of the Committee on Admis- 
sions. On the basis of all available informa- 
tion the best possible applicants will be 
chosen for admission to the School. 



ADMISSION WITH 
ADVANCED STANDING 

(a) Graduates in medicine or students in 
medicine who have completed two or 
more years in a medical school, with stand- 
ards acceptable to the School of Medicine, 
University of Maryland, may be given 
advanced standing to the Sophomore year 
provided the applicant shall complete 
under competent regular instruction the 
course in Basic Dental Science regularly 
scheduled in the first year. 

(b) Applicants for transfer from a 
school of dentistry or medicine must (1) 
meet fully the requirements for admission 
to the first year of the dental course; (2) 
be eligible for promotion to the next higher 
class in the school from which he seeks to 
transfer; (3) have no grades below C in 
the school where transfer credits are 
earned; (4) show evidence of scholastic 
attainments, character and personality; 
(5) present letters of honorable dismissal 
and recommendation from the dean of the 
school from which he transfers. 

(c) All applicants for transfer must 
make an appointment for an interview 
before a qualifying certificate can be 
issued. 



School of Dentistry / 15 



ACADEMIC POLICIES 

The following symbols are used as marks 
for final grades: A (Excellent), B (Supe- 
rior), C (Average), D (Below Average) 
and F (Failure). In addition, the following 
grades may be used as progress grades: 
I (Incomplete) and E (Unsatisfactory). 

A failure in any subject may be removed 
only by repeating the subject in full. Stu- 
dents who have done work of acceptable 
quality in their completed assignments and 
who, because of circumstances beyond 
their control, have been unable to finish all 
assignments will be given an Incomplete. 
A student shall not carry an Incomplete 
into the next succeeding year. When he 
has completed the requirements for the 
removal of an Incomplete, the student 
shall be given the actual grade earned in 
the course. A student whose work at the 
end of the course is not satisfactory can be 
given the grade E. This grade implies that 
the student can make up the work or 
achieve a satisfactory level of proficiency 
in a short interval of time after the course 
has ended without having to repeat the 
course. The student's final grade will be 
no higher than a C. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the 
basis of semester credits assigned to each 
course and the numerical values for grades. 
The numerical values are A-4; B-3; C-2; 
D-l; F-0. The grade point average is the 
sum of the products of semester credits 
and grade values, divided by the total 
number of semester credits. 

Students who fail to meet the minimum 
grade point averages required for promo- 
tion and who fall into the following cate- 
gories may be allowed probationary 
promotion : 

1. Freshmen who obtain a grade 
point average of 1.70-1.99. 

2. Sophomores who obtain a grade 
point average of 1.70-1.99 for 
courses taken during the sopho- 
more year. 



3. Juniors who obtain a grade point 
average of 1.85-1.99 for courses 
taken during the junior year. 
Probationary status will not be permitted 
for two successive years. 

A student may absolve a total of eight 
credit hours of failure in an accredited 
summer school provided that he has the 
grade point average required for promo- 
tion or graduation. 

EQUIPMENT AND 
SUPPLIES 

A complete list of necessary instruments 
and materials for all courses is presented 
by the School of Dentistry. Arrangements 
are made by the School of Dentistry in 
advance of formal enrollment for instru- 
ments and materials to be delivered to the 
students at the opening of school. Each 
student should provide himself promptly 
with these prescribed necessities. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR 
GRADUATION 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is 
conferred upon a candidate who has met 
the following conditions: 

1. A candidate must furnish docu- 
mentary evidence that he has 
attained the age of 21 years. 

2. A candidate for graduation shall 
have attended the full scheduled 
course. 

3. He will be required to show a min- 
imum grade point average of 2.0 
for the full course of study. 

4. He shall have satisfied all require- 
ments of the various departments. 

5. He shall have paid all indebted- 
ness to the college prior to the 
beginning of final examinations, 
and must have adjusted his finan- 
cial obligations in the community 
satisfactorily to those to whom he 
may be indebted. 



16/ University of Maryland 



SCHOLARSHIP AND 
LOAN FUNDS 

Health Professions Student Scholarships. 
The Comprehensive Health Manpower 
Training Act of 1971 extended coverage of 
the Federal Health Professions Scholarship 
Program. As a result, scholarship assistance 
is available to students who demonstrate 
an exceptional financial need. Scholarships 
are reviewable after annual reassessment of 
the student's financial position. 

State Grants. In an attempt to meet the 
ever increasing needs of students, the State 
of Maryland Legislature allocates funds to 
the University each year earmarked for 
student assistance. As a result, State Grants 
are available to disadvantaged students 
who demonstrate a financial ne^d. Awards 
are made on an individual basis after care- 
ful review of the student's current finan- 
cial situation. 

Health Professions Student Loans. Un- 
der the Federal Health Professions Pro- 
gram, loans are made available to qualified 
students. Loans are reviewed on an annual 
basis and vary in amount depending on 
the student's financial need. Students are 
not assessed interest premiums until they 
graduate and begin repayment. Repay- 
ments begin one year after graduation and 
must be completed within ten years from 
that time. Current interest is charged at 
the rate of 3 percent per annum. Borrowers 
who practice dentistry in an area having a 
shortage in their profession may annually 
cancel ten percent of the loan up to a 
maximum of 50 percent. If the practice 
occurs in a designated low income district, 
cancellation at fifteen percent annually is 
allowed up to 100 percent of the loan. 

Bank Loans. Loan programs have been 
established through the Maryland Higher 
Education Loan Corporation and the 
United Student Aid Fund which permit 



students to borrow money from their home 
town banks. Graduate and professional stu- 
dents may borrow up to $1,500 per year 
to assist in meeting their educational 
expenses. Borrowers begin repayment ten 
months after graduation or withdrawal 
from school. At the present time, simple 
interest is charged at the rate of 7 percent. 
Further details may be secured from the 
Office of Student Aid. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational 
Endowment Fund. Under a provision of 
the will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord, 
of New Haven, Connecticut, an amount 
approximating $16,000 was left to the Bal- 
timore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland, the pro- 
ceeds of which are to be devoted to aiding 
worthy young men in securing dental 
education. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation. During 
World War II the Foundation recognized 
the burden that the accelerated course im- 
posed upon many dental students who 
under normal circumstances would earn 
money for their education by employment 
during the summer vacation. The Founda- 
tion granted to this School a fund to pro- 
vide rotating loans to deserving dental 
students. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund. This 
fund was established in 1954 by the New 
Jersey Alumni Association in memory of 
Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of the 
Class of 1910. The fund is a source of valu- 
able help in aiding students to solve their 
temporary financial problems. 

The Student Dental Association-Alumni 
Fund. This fund, created in 1960, was 
established for the purpose of aiding any 
student of the School who may be in need 
of an emergency loan. 

American Fund for Dental Education, 
Incorporated. Through the efforts of the 



School of Dentistry / 17 



American Dental Association this fund was 
incorporated in 1955 as the Fund for Den- 
tal Education. It was reincorporated in 
1963 under its present name and provides 
assistance to deserving students through- 
out the nation. 

The International College of Dentists 
Student Loan Fund. In 1962 the Interna- 
tional College of Dentists established a 
fund to assist deserving senior students in 
need of financial aid. 

United Student Aid Funds, Incorporated. 
In 1963 this fund, which is supported by 
private enterprise and the University, was 
established. The fund provides assistance 
to sophomore, junior and senior students 
and utilizes the services of participating 
banking institutions. 

Gillette Hayden Memorial Foundation 
Student Loan Program. This loan is avail- 
able to promising women students in their 
junior, senior or graduate years of dental 
school. At this time the amounts are not to 
exceed $1,000.00 each and is repayable one 
year and one month after the date of grad- 
uation at a per annum interest rate of 1%. 
There is no formal application form, but 
requirements are a transcript of the appli- 
cant's academic record, a letter of recom- 
mendation from the Dean, a character 



reference from a reputable person in the 
applicant's home town, and the name and 
address of the nearest relative. All in- 
quiries should be addressed to the Gillette 
Hayden Memorial Foundation, Suite 204, 
33 Ponce de Leon Avenue, N.E., Atlanta, 
Georgia 30308. 



SPECIAL LECTURE FUNDS 

The Grayson W. Gaver Memorial Lecture. 
Through the generosity of his family and 
of the School alumni an endowed lecture- 
ship has been established in memory of the 
late Dr. Grayson W. Gaver. Dr. Gaver was 
an outstanding leader in the field of 
prosthodontics and a distinguished mem- 
ber of the faculty for many years. It is 
fitting that his name be perpetuated 
through an annual lecture devoted to the 
field of prosthodontics. 

The William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell 
Lecture. In 1965 two faithful alumni, Drs. 
William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell, pre- 
sented the School with a generous contri- 
bution for the purpose of instituting special 
lectures for the benefit of the student body 
and faculty. The first lecture in the series 
was presented in April, 1966. These lec- 
tures provide a means of broadening the 
total academic program. 




18/ University of Maryland 



PLAN OF CURRICULUM 
SUMMARY OF CLOCK HOURS 



YEAR I 



Subject 



Trimester 



Total 



Anatomy ( Gross ) 

DANA 511 

Anatomy (Microscopic) 

DHIS 511 

Basic Dental Science 

DENT 511 

Biochemistry 

DBIC 511 

Community Dentistry 

DCOM 511, 513 

Conjoint Science 

DCJS 511 

Special Assignments 

Microbiology 

DMIC 513 

Pharmacology 

DPHR 513 

Physiology 

DPHS 512 



110 

88 

33 

88 

33 

44 
44 






440 



110 


154 





44 
44 





88 
440 






220 





88 


143 


330 





88 


33 


66 


44 


132 


44 


132 


88 


88 


88 


88 





88 



440 



1320 



YEAR II 



Subject 



Trimester 



Total 



Basic Dental Science 

DENT 521 

Community Dentistry 

DCOM 521, 522, 523 

Conjoint Science 

DCJS 521 

Principles of Bio-Medicine 

DPAT 521 

Special Assignments 



220 


220 


220 


660 


22 


22 


22 


66 


88 


88 


88 


264 


66 
44 

440 


66 
44 

^40 


66 
44 

lio 


198 
132 

1320 



School of Dentistry / 19 



Subject 



YEAR III 



Trimester 



Total 



Community Dentistry 

DCOM 531, 532, 533 

Conjoint Science 

DCJS 531 

Pedodontics 

PEDO 531 

Periodontics 

PERI 531 

Principles of Bio-Medicine 

DPAT 531 

Restorative Dentistry 

DRES 531 

Surgery 

DSUR 531, 532 

Clinic 

Special Assignments 



22 


22 


22 


66 


44 


66 


66 


176 


22 


33 





55 


22 


11 





33 


44 


44 





88 


33 


33 





66 


33 

•20 



t40 


11 

220 



440 




308 

44 

440 


44 

748 

44 

1320 



Subject 



YEAR IV 



Trimester 



Total 



Community Dentistry 
DCOM 541, 542, 543 
Conjoint Science 
DCJS 531 
Clinic 



22 

88 
330 

440 



22 

88 
330 

440 



22 

88 
330 

440 



66 

264 
990 

1320 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



UTA CS 




ANATOMY 

Professors: Hahn, Piavis, Provenza 

(Chairman) 
Associate Professor: Barry 
Assistant Professors: Gartner, Hobart, Meszler, 

Swartz 
Instructors: Hiatt and Seibel 
Lecturer: Lindenberg 

The basic course in Human Anatomy con- 
sists of a thorough study of the cells, tissues, 
organs and organ systems of the body from the 
gross, microscopic and developmental aspects. 
Principles of body structure and function are 
studied with particular emphasis on those con- 
cerned with the head, facial region, oral cavity 
and associated organs. Neuroanatomy deals 
with the gross and microscopic structure of 
the central nervous system and peripheral 
nerves with special attention to functional 
phases. Correlation is made with other courses 
in the basic sciences and clinical disciplines of 
the dental curriculum. 

DANA 511. HUMAN ANATOMY 
DANA 514. THE ANATOMY OF THE 
HEAD AND NECK 



For Graduate Students 

DANA 610. INHERITANCE AND DE- 
VELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (6) 

DANA 611. HUMAN GROSS ANATOMY 
(8) 

DANA 612. HUMAN NEUROANATOMY 
(2) 

DANA 615. COMPARATIVE ANIMAL 
HISTOLOGY (6) 

DANA 616. EXPERIMENTAL EMBRYOL- 
OGY (4) 

DANA 617. RADIATION BIOLOGY (4) 

DANA 618. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN 
HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 
(Credit by arrangement) 

DANA 619. SEMINAR (1) 

DANA 620. PHYSICAL METHODS IN' 
HISTOLOGY (4) 

DANA 621. MAMMALIAN HISTOLOGY 
AND EMBRYOLOGY (6) 

DANA 622. MAMMALIAN ORAL HISTOL- 
OGY AND EMBRYOLOGY (2) 

DANA 799. MASTER'S THESIS 
RESEARCH 
(Credit by arrangement) 

DANA 899. DISSERTATION 
RESEARCH 
(Credit by arrangement) 



School of Dentistry 1 21 



Sisca, 

Norris 

Diaz, 
John- 



BASIC DENTAL SCIENCE 

Professors: Abramson, Barr, Jerbi, Ramsey, 
and Williamson (Director) 

Associate Professors: DeVore, Dosh, Forrester, 
Gigliotti (Assistant Director), Grewe, Ham- 
ilton, Hasler, McLean-Lu, Olson, 
Steele, and E. G. Vanden Bosche 

Associate Clinical Professors: Halpert, 
and Swinehart 

Assistant Professors: Buchness, Carr, 
Dopson, Fetchero, Fleming, Haroth, 
son, Livingston, Mastrola, Mislowsky, Mor- 
ganstein, Quarantillo, Reese, Rodgers, 
Sardana, Shelton, Thompson, Tilghman, 
Wagner and Williams 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Bethea, Branoff, 
Cullen, McKinnon, Saini, Schunick, and 
Seipp 

Instructors: Holston, Livaditis, Spechler and 
Vandermer 

Clinical Instructors: R. C. Vanden Bosche 

Clinical Associate: E. Miller 

Assistants: King and Rutherford 

During the first and second years of the cur- 
riculum, Basic Dental Science is the unit 
directly responsible for the teaching of the fun- 
damental principles, techniques, and manual 
skills related to the practice of dentistry. The 
subjects within the unit are dental morphology 
and occlusion, preventive dentistry, perio- 
dontics, dental materials, instruments and 
equipment, operative dentistry, fixed partial 
prosthodontics, removable complete and partial 
prosthodontics, endodontics, pedodontics, or- 
thodontics, oral surgery, and local anesthesia. 
The teaching and learning tools include the 
use of lecture, laboratory projects, self -instruc- 
tional media, assigned reading, clinical assign- 
ments, and both written and practical examina- 
tions. The course planning and presentation are 
the results of the conjoint effort of members of 
every clinical department in the School of 
Dentistry. 

DENT 511. BASIC DENTAL SCIENCE I 
DENT 521. BASIC DENTAL SCIENCE II 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Associate Professors: Ganis (Chairman) and 
Leonard 




Associate Research Professor: Zubairi 
Assistant Professors: Bashirelahi, Courtade 
and Morris 

The department is involved in teaching a 
course to the first year dental students which 
covers the chemistry of living matter. The 
course includes the chemistry and metabolism 
of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and 
nucleic acids, as well as enzymes, biological 
oxidation-reduction, certain physical-chemical 
principles, and the chemistry of hormones and 
certain biological fluids. The department also 
participates in the conjoint science program in 
such areas as the functional biochemistry of the 
cell, genetics, mineral metabolism, and 
carcinogenesis. 

DBIC 511. PRINCIPLES OF 
BIOCHEMISTRY 

For Graduates 

DBIC 600. ADVANCED 

BIOCHEMISTRY (6) 
Prerequisite, Biochemistry 511 or its equiv- 
alent. 
DBIC 799. THESIS RESEARCH 

(Master's Level) Number of hours and 

credit by arrangement. 
DBIC 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH 

(Doctorate Level) 



22/ University of Maryland 



CLINICAL DENTISTRY 



COMMUNITY DENTISTRY 



Staff: All Clinical Departments 

The clinical program is designed to provide 
the student with a broad background of clinical 
experience based on the philosophy of preven- 
tion. Although the need for treatment of exist- 
ing disease is of paramount importance, the 
clinical program stresses those aspects of com- 
plete dental care which are founded on pre- 
venting the occurrence or recurrence of 
disease. Each third and fourth year student is 
assigned his own "dental office" where he treats 
patients in a manner similar to the general 
practitioner in the community. Clinical areas 
for undergraduate instruction are designated 
as general practice clinics and teaching is 
accomplished using teams of specialists work- 
ing together to provide in-depth interdepart- 
mental instruction for the student and the 
highest level of dental care for the patient. 



7 




-■'■ 




Professor: Pollack (Chairman) 

Associate Professors: Donnelly and Roseman 

Associate Clinical Professors: Lentz, Lisansky, 
and Rapoport 

Assistant Professors: Hayden, Soble, and 
Wagman 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Drabkowski, Liv- 
ingston, Rutter, Sachs, Shulman, and Webb 

Clinical Instructors: San Agustin and 
Vandenberge 

Special Lecturers: Bushel, Carlos, Englander, 
Hawkins, Holmes, Hopkins, Inman, Kerr, 
McCauley, Matanoski, O'Donnell, Weinstein, 
and Zadek 

Associates: Gallant and Schachtel 

Community Dentistry has as its primary 
focus the application of principles of human 
behavior, social organization and scientific 
methodology, designed to improve quality and 
increase quantity of dental service to the entire 
community. During the four year curriculum, 
the student participates in didactic and clinical 
courses, supported by field experiences. The 
courses are encompassed in five program 
areas: Sociology of Health Care (including his- 
tory, ethics, law, attitudes toward disease and 
health care, community expectations and cur- 
rent issues in dentistry); Administration of 
Health Care (including health needs and man- 
power, preventive programs, delivery systems 
of health care, hospital dentistry, and practice 
administration); Principles of Epidemiology 
(including the epidemiology of oral diseases 
and research methodology); Dental Care of 
the Handicapped and Special Population 
Groups; and Communication Skills in Health 
Practice. The student spends time in the com- 
munity during many of the courses. Appropri- 
ate clinical assignments are provided in special 
community facilities. Teaching methodology 
employed by the department includes lectures, 
seminars, field assignments, clinical assign- 
ments, self-instruction and independent activi- 
ties. 

DCOM 511. INTRODUCTION TO PRE- 
VENTIVE DENTISTRY AND COM- 
MUNITY HEALTH (Includes field visits 
and the Community Dentistry Laboratory) 



School of Dentistry 1 23 




DCOM 512. INTRODUCTION TO 

DELIVERY SYSTEMS OF HEALTH 

CARE 
DCOM 521 HUMAN FACTORS IN 

HEALTH CARE (Includes field visits) 
DCOM 522. EPIDEMIOLOGIC 

METHODS (Includes Community 

Dentistry Laboratory 
DCOM 531. PRINCIPLES OF SPECIAL 

PATIENT CARE 
DCOM 532. DELIVERY SYSTEMS OF 

DENTAL CARE (Includes field visits) 
DCOM 533. BASIC CLINICAL CARE FOR 

SPECIAL PATIENTS 
DCOM 534. HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

COMMUNICATION 
DCOM 542. SEMINAR IN PRACTICE 

DYNAMICS (Includes field visits) 
DCOM 543. ADVANCED CLINICAL 

CARE FOR SPECIAL PATIENTS 

(Includes field visits) 
DCOM 544. THESIS 



Enrichment Program in Epidemiology and 
Dental Public Health 

Two enrichment tracks are available in the 
Department of Community Dentistry for third 
and fourth year students: one in epidemiology 
and one in Dental Public Health. These tracks 
supplement the regular teaching program in 
preventive dentistry and community health 
conducted by the Department of Community 
Dentistry. 

The long-range goal of the program is to 
stimulate continuing interest on the part of 
students who might choose Epidemiology or 
Dental Public Health as a career and to pro- 
vide them with specialized training. 

Each curriculum enrichment track will be 
individualized and the educational program will 
rely on student seminars, filed experiences, 
student initiated efforts, and a clinical clerk- 
ship in the senior year. There will be no across- 
the-board required courses. Students who 
elect and are approved for the enrichment 
track may be excused from the standard 



24/ University of Maryland 



courses in Community Dentistry during their 
third and fourth years. 

At the completion of the enrichment pro- 
gram, each student will submit for review and 
evaluation a completed project representing his 
individual efforts. The nature of the project 
will have been selected by the student in con- 
sultation with his assigned advisor prior to the 
last year of the enrichment program. 

Student selection to the enrichment program 
will be based upon the following criteria: their 
expressed interest; their performance in the 
standard courses presented by the Department 
prior to the time of application; their general 
performance level in all courses of the school; 
and a personal interview. Enrollment is limited. 

The following courses are those available to 
the Enrichment Track Students : 
DCOM 539. SPECIAL STUDIES IN DEN- 
TAL PUBLIC HEALTH 
DCOM 549. SPECIAL STUDIES IN DEN- 
TAL PUBLIC HEALTH 



CONJOINT SCIENCES 

Staff: All Departments 

The program in Conjoint Sciences is de- 
signed to present interdepartmental instruction 
from the basic sciences and the clinical sci- 
ences. Problems of clinical significance form 
the basis of subject material for the program. 
Instruction involves eveiy department, where 
appropriate, contributing their expertise to the 
understanding and solution of the problem. 
Each year of the Conjoint Sciences focuses on 
broad general areas of instruction with the first 
and second year more heavily oriented toward 
the basic sciences and the third and fourth 
years more directly related to general and spe- 
cial clinical problems. In addition, a special 
program for the diagnosis and treatment of 
oral cancer is also incorporated in the Conjoint 
Sciences during all four years of instruction. 




School of Dentistry/ 25 



DCJS 511, 512, 513. CONJOINT SCIENCES 
I— ORIENTATION TO DENTISTRY; 
GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 

DCJS 521, 522, 523. CONJOINT SCIENCES 
II— CARIES AND PERIODONTAL 
DISEASE 

DCJS 531, 532, 533. CONJOINT 

SCIENCES III— MANAGEMENT OF 
ORAL CONDITIONS ASSOCIATED 
WITH CHILDHOOD, ADOLESCENCE, 
ADULTS, AND THE AGED 

DCJS 541, 542, 543. CONJOINT SCIENCES 
IV— INTERDEPARTMENTAL CASE 
PRESENTATIONS 



DENTAL AUXILIARY 
UTILIZATION 

Program Director: Barr 

Instructor: Dent 

Supervising Dental Assistant: Miller 

A program is provided to teach dental stu- 
dents to successfully practice clinical dentistry 
utilizing trained chairside dental assistants. 
This program emphasizes the need for the 
dentist to expand his capability to provide high 
quality dental services to the community 
through the use of auxiliaries. 

The program is both didactic and clinical in 
content and exists in all four years of under- 
graduate instruction. The major emphasis is 
provided during the third and fourth years in 
the clinical program. Students are instructed 
how to operate in a seated position in order for 
them, the patient, and the dental assistant to be 
more comfortable. In addition, students are 
presented information on equipment criteria 
as well as other aspects of operatory design. 
Seminars, motion pictures, single concept films, 
video tapes, and a manual are used extensively 



in this teaching program. 



MEDICINE 



Professors: Blanchard, Borges, Connor, Dennis, 
Helrich, Hornick, Lisansky, McCrumb, Mer- 
lis, Revell, Richards, Robinson, Scherlis, 
Spicer, Wiswell and Woodward (Chairman) 



Associate Professors: Cotter, Greisman, Raskin, 

Spurling and Workman 
Assistant Professors: Entwisle and Pachuta 

(Director) 

The introduction to medicine and principles 
of medicine and physical diagnosis are taught 
in interdisciplinary programs in Conjoint Sci- 
ences and Principles of Bio-Medicine. Ward 
rounds are conducted for small groups of stu- 
dents in the fourth year. 



MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: Shay (Chairman) 

Associate Professors: Krywolap and Sydiskis 

Assistant Professors: Chang, Delisle, Joseph, 

Nauman and Schneider 
Special Lecturers: Jansen, Libonati and Snyder 

The Department of Microbiology offers un- 
dergraduate and graduate programs. The 
undergraduate program is organized in such a 
way as to supply the student with the funda- 
mental principles of microbiology in order that 
he may understand the chemical and biological 
mechanisms of the production of disease by 
bacteria and other parasites and the means by 
which the host protects itself against bacteria 
and related organisms. The graduate programs 
leading toward the degrees of Master of Sci- 
ence and Doctor of Philosophy are designed to 
train students for positions in research and 
teaching. 

DMIC 521. DENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 
AND IMMUNOLOGY 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

DMIC 401. PATHOGENIC MICROBIOL- 
OGY (4) 

DMIC 451. SEROLOGY-IMMUNOLOGY 
(3) 

DMIC 452. VIROLOGY (3) 

DMIC 453. MYCOLOGY (3) 

DMIC 454. PARASITOLOGY (3) 

For Graduates 

DMIC 600, 601. CHEMOTHERAPY (1,1) 

DMIC 602. THEORY AND PRINCIPLES 

OF REAGENTS AND MEDIA (3) 
DMIC 609. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN 

MICROBIOLOGY (1-6) 



26/ University of Maryland 



DMIC 611. PUBLIC HEALTH (2) 

DMIC 612. BACTERIAL FERMENTA- 
TIONS (2) 

DMIC 621. ADVANCED DENTAL 

MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 
(4) 

DMIC 624. MICROBIOLOGY OF THE 
PERIODONTIUM (2) 

DMIC 630. EXPERIMENTAL 
VIROLOGY (4) 

DMIC 635. BACTERIAL GENETICS (4) 

DMIC 650. ADVANCED GENERAL 
MICROBIOLOGY (4) 

DMIC 653. TECHNIQUES IN MICROS- 
COPY (4) 

DMIC 689. SEMINAR (1) 

DMIC 710. MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY 

DMIC 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's 
Level) 

DMIC 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
(Doctoral Level) 



ORAL PATHOLOGY 

Professors: Biddix, Lunin (Chairman) and 

S alley 
Associate Professors: Hasler, Horn, Olson and 

Swancar 
Associate Clinical Professor: Brotman 
Assistant Professors: Beckerman, Levy, Over- 

holser, Pachuta, Park and Riekstniece 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Bloom, Bryant, 

McKinnon and Rothschild 
Instructors: Arafat and Vandermer 
Clinical Instructors: Aks, Fahey, Gossard, 

Nachman, Reveley and Spechler 
Special Lecturers: McKusick and Scofield 
Associate: Bingham 
Division Heads: 

Pathology: Lunin 

Oral Diagnosis: Hasler 

Radiology: Hasler 

The undergraduate teaching program con- 
sists of an interdisciplinary course that covers 
the basic principles of pathology and medicine 
through presentation of the morphologic, chem- 
ical and physiologic changes of basic disease 
processes and important specific diseases. Em- 
phasis is placed on the diagnosis, etiology, 
pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of dis- 



ease processes in the oral cavity. The aim is to 
provide a sound basis for the differential diag- 
nosis of oral lesions and a rationale for their 
treatment. The student is provided ample op- 
portunity to develop proficiency in problem 
solving in oral diagnosis. A variety of tech- 
niques for examination and diagnosis are 
covered, including dental radiography. A grad- 
uate program is offered for graduate students 
desiring specialty or research training. 

DP AT 521. PRINCIPLES OF BIO- 
MEDICINE 

DPAT 531. PRINCIPLES OF BIO- 
MEDICINE 

For Graduates 

DPAT 612, 613. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN 
ORAL PATHOLOGY (2) 

DPAT 614, 615. HISTOPATHOLOGY 
TECHNICS (4) 

DPAT 616, 617. ADVANCED HISTOPA- 
THOLOGY OF ORAL LESIONS (3) 

DPAT 618, 619. SEMINAR (1) 

DPAT 799. RESEARCH 



ORTHODONTICS 

Associate Professor: Grewe (Chairman) 

Associate Clinical Professors: Kress and 
Swinehart 

Assistant Professor: Hirzel 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Branoff, Cullen, 
Dunn, Goldman, Markin, Pavlick, Saini and 
Seipp 

Special Lecturers: Christiansen, Frazier, John- 
ston and Niswander 

The program is designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent with musculoskeletal growth and devel- 
opment, evolution of human occlusion, the 
biologic factors in malocclusion and the tissue 
changes incidental to tooth movement. The 
didactic portion of the program is given as part 
of the interdisciplinary courses through all 
four years. Clinical experience is obtained 
under supervision of the Orthodontic Depart- 
ment in the third and fourth years. 

ORTH 531. 



School of Dentistry/ 27 



PEDODONTICS 

Associate Professor: Forrester (Chairman) 

Associate Clinical Professor: Kihn 

Assistant Professors: Fleming, Owen, Schulz, 

Shelton and Wagner 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Balis, Fox and 

Weinstein 
Clinical Instructors: Barren and Hill 
Special Lecturers: Albertson, Bernstein, 

Landis and Moore 
Clinical Associate: Heese 

The student is introduced to the perform- 
ance of dentistry for children by means of lec- 
tures and laboratory projects while participat- 
ing in Basic Dental Science. Didactic 
instruction consists of a series of lectures. Par- 
ticular attention is devoted to diagnosis and 
treatment planning, preventive dentistry pro- 
cedures including fluoride therapy, non-puni- 
tive patient management techniques incorpo- 
rating the use of psychopharmacologic agents, 
treatment of traumatic injuries to the primary 
and young permanent dentition, restorative 
procedures in primary teeth, pulpal therapy, 
and interceptive orthodontics with emphasis 
upon diagnostic procedures and the treatment 
of incipient malocclusions in the primary and 
mixed dentitions. 

PEDO 531. DENTISTRY FOR CHILDREN 



PERIODONTICS 

Professors: Barr and Pridgeon 

Associate Clinical Professors: Halpert, Plessett 

and Samaha 
Assistant Professors: Golski, Halpern, Haskins, 

Livingston (Acting Chairman), and 

Mislowsky 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Green, Lever, 

Narun, Perkin, Sobkov, Winson, Wollman, 

Wood and Zupnik 
Clinical Instructors: Goldman and Nurin 

The student is introduced to periodontology 
through lectures, demonstrations, and clinical 
practice as a part of Conjoint Sciences and Basic 
Dental Science. Attention during the first two 
years is focused on providing a basic back- 
ground and experience in the science of peri- 
odontology and to prepare the student for clini- 
cal periodontal practice. In years III and IV, 
the fundamentals and therapeutics of periodon- 
tics, both didactic and clinical, are given in 
more detail and depth. The student continues 
to refine his clinical periodontal experience 
and his judgment for the recognition, preven- 
tion and treatment of periodontal disease. The 
importance of preventive periodontics in daily 
practice and its relationship to total dental 
health are stressed. 

PERI 53. PERIODONTOLOGY 




28/ University of Maryland 



PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor: Burgison (Chairman) 
Associate Professors: Dolle and Rudo 
Assistant Professors: Crossley, Kosegarten and 

Wynn 
Lecturer: Taylor 

The program of instruction in Pharmacology 
is divided in three phases. Phase I includes a 
thorough study of basic concepts and principles 
in pharmacology using only prototype drugs. 
Emphasis is placed on the mechanism of 
action of drugs, their absorption, distribution, 
metabolism, excretion and drug interactions. 
Phase II deals with clinical aspects of Oral and 
Nutritional Therapeutics presented in the vari- 
ous conjoint science programs. Special atten- 
tion is given to clinically useful drugs, their 
indications and contraindications. Phase III, 
designed for the graduate and postdoctoral 
students, is an in-depth coverage of current 
topics in general pharmacology, biotransforma- 
tion of drugs, molecular pharmacology and 
pharmacology of local and general anesthetics. 

DPHR 513. GENERAL PHARMACOLOGY 
AND THERAPEUTICS 

For Graduates 

DPHR 606. GENERAL PHARMACOLOGY 
AND THERAPEUTICS (6) 

DPHR 616. BIOTRANSFORMATION OF 
DRUGS (3) 

DPHR 626. MOLECULAR PHARMACOL- 
OGY^) 

DPHR 636. PHARMACOLOGY OF ANES- 
THETIC DRUGS (3) 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: White (Chairman) 
Associate Professor: Kidder 
Assistant Professor: Bennett 
Instructors: Bonas, Nardell and Staling 
Lecturers: Buxbaum and Fox 

Lectures cover the major fields of physiology, 
including the following areas: central and 
peripheral nervous systems, neuro-muscular 
function, heart and circulation, respiration, 
kidney and body fluids, gastrointestinal tract, 
endocrines and reproduction. Laboratory dem- 
onstrations include experiments with turtle 



heart and frog nerve-muscle preparations, 
mammalian operative work and observations 
on the human subject. 

DPHS 512. PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates 

DPHS 611. PRINCIPLES OF MAMMAL- 
IAN PHYSIOLOGY (6) 
DPHS 618. ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY 

(1) 
DPHS 628. 
DPHS 799. 

Level) 
DPHS 899. 



RESEARCH (1-3) 
THESIS RESEARCH (Master's 

DISSERTATION RESEARCH 



(Doctoral Level) 




School of Dentistry/ 29 



RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY 

Professors: Abramson, Jerbi, Ramsey (Chair- 
man), and Williamson 

Associate Professors: Choudhary, Dosh, Gigli- 
otti, McLean-Lu, Sisca, Steele and E. G. 
Vanden Bosche 

Associate Clinical Professors: Graham and 
Norris 

Assistant Professors: Anton, Buchness, Carr, 
Diaz, Dopson, Fetchero, Haroth, Johnson, 
Mastrola, Morganstein, Quarantillo, Reese, 
Rodgers, Sardana and Thompson 

Assistant Clinical Professors: August, Bethea, 
Jacobs, Schunick, Williams and Zurkow 

Instructors: Abraham, Holston, Livaditis, Mor- 
ris, Towns, Walker and Ward 

Clinical Instructors: Burt, Dent, Finagin, 
Goode, Hertzler, Klein, Miller, Mort, Rup- 
precht, R. C. Vanden Bosche, Walowitz and 
Youmatz 

Clinical Associates: Andrews, Baile, Brave, 
Dumont, Goren, Iddings, Levinson, A. 
Miller, E. Miller, Weglarski and Wisman. 

Assistants: Britt, King and Rutherford 

The program of instruction in Restorative 
Dentistry is divided into three phases. Phase I 
consists of departmental participation in Basic 
Dental Science 511 and 521. Phase II consists 
of didactic instruction which extends the fun- 
damental concepts introduced in Basic Dental 
Science, correlates these concepts and applies 
them to effective management of clinical den- 
tal health procedures. Phase III consists of 
clinical treatment of dental patients under the 
individual guidance of staff members. Empha- 
sis is placed upon assessing the total dental 
problem of the individual patient, planning 
treatment consistent with these total dental 
needs, and providing restorative services which 
satisfy the objectives of prevention, function 
and esthetics. 

DRES 531. RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY 



SURGERY 

Associate Professors: Cappuccio, DeVore and 

Hamilton (Chairman) 
Assistant Professors: Bergman, Johnson and 

Tilghman 
Clinical Associates: Elliott, Rodriguez and 

Warson 
Special Lecturer: Helrich 

Introductory lectures in minor Oral Surgery, 
preclinical laboratory in Oral Surgery and lec- 
tures and demonstrations in local anesthesia 
are given during the second and third quarters 
of the second year by departmental participa- 
tion in Basic Dental Science. Third year lec- 
tures involve all phases of Oral Surgery and 
General Anesthesia. Students are assigned to 
the Oral Surgery clinic in block segments dur- 
ing their second, third and fourth year for 
progressive participation in oral surgical proce- 
dures. Fourth year students are assigned to the 
hospital for operating room experience and for 
general anesthesia experience. They also take 
night call with the Oral Surgery intern. The 
department participates in three years of Con- 
joint Science. 



DSUR 532. 
DSUR 533. 



ORAL SURGERY 
ORAL SURGERY 



For Graduates 

DSUR 601. CLINICAL ANESTHESIOL- 
OGY (6) 

DSUR 610. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN 

ORAL SURGERY (Credit by arrange- 
ment) 

DSUR 620. GENERAL DENTAL ORAL 
SURGERY (4) 

DSUR 621. ADVANCED ORAL SURGERY 
(4) 

DSUR 799. RESEARCH 



ADVANCED 
EDUCATION PROGRAMS 



POSTGRADUATE 
EDUCATION 

The University of Maryland School of Den- 
tistry has long recognized the need for 
more well educated and highly trained spe- 
cialists to serve the state, but not until the 
recent move to Hayden-Harris Hall has the 
capability existed to initiate these pro- 
grams. Clinic facilities on the third floor of 
the new building provide individual offices 
with supporting laboratories and radio- 
graphic areas for postgraduate education. 
The School of Dentistry has conducted ad- 
vanced education programs in oral surgery 
for many years and in pedodontics since 
1969. In September 1970 a full program 
was initiated and presently all disciplines 
are represented. 

The School of Dentistry provides post- 
graduate education leading to eligibility for 
specialty board certification in the follow- 
ing areas: Endodontics, Oral Surgery, Or- 
thodontics, Pedodontics, Periodontics, and 
Prosthodontics. All programs meet accredi- 
tation requirements of the Council on Den- 
tal Education of the American Dental 
Association. Students successfully complet- 
ing any of these programs are awarded a 
certificate by the University of Maryland. 

Programs are available also for those who 
wish to pursue a graduate degree in one of 
the basic sciences concurrent with clinical 
specialty education. The length of educa- 
tion for the combined degree /specialty- 
training program generally requires three 



years for the Master's Degree (M.S.) and 
five years for the Doctor of Philosophy 
(Ph.D.). These programs are highly in- 
dividualized and are developed according 
to the individual needs and wishes of the 
candidate. 

Those matriculating in the clinical spe- 
cialty programs are registered as special 
students in the Graduate School of the 
University and will receive graduate credit 
in addition to their specialty education. 

The specialty programs are all developed 
with a balance between the biologic sci- 
ences and advanced clinical instruction. The 
facilities of the School of Dentistry, School 
of Medicine, University of Maryland Hos- 
pital, and other related institutions of the 
University of Maryland at Baltimore are 
used for didactic as well as clinical in- 
struction. In addition, facilities for research 
are available to these students in the de- 
partments in which the students are en- 
rolled or in other related departments. 

All applicants must have a D.D.S. or 
D.M.D. degree and give evidence of high 
scholastic achievement. 

Endodontics. The program in endodon- 
tics is designed to emphasize the significant 
relationship between the basic biologic sci- 
ences and the clinical practice of endodon- 
tics. In addition, courses in the other clini- 
cal dental, social and behavioral sciences 
are included in order to broaden the 



32/ University of Maryland 



knowledge and development of the stu- 
dent. The ultimate goal of the program is 
to prepare the candidate for clinical prac- 
tice, teaching and research in endodontics. 
The program encompasses a minimum of 
21 months of full-time instruction begin- 
ning in September. Approximately 3,000 
hours of instruction are divided as follows: 
600 hours of core basic sciences, 1200 hours 
of clinical practice, 600 hours for instruc- 
tion in related dental, medical, social and 
behavioral science courses, and 600 hours 
for research, thesis preparation and under- 
graduate teaching. The program is inte- 
grated so that the biologic and clinical 
sciences are presented over the entire pro- 
gram in order to better relate these two 
areas. 

Oral Surgery. A thirty-six to forty-eight 
month postgraduate educational program 
is offered leading to eligibility for examina- 
tion by the American Board of Oral Sur- 
gery. The first year of the program is an 
internship in Oral Surgery at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Hospital. Three interns 
are selected annually. Interns are assigned 
to an on-call, nightly and weekend sched- 
ule on a rotating basis. In addition to 
clinical oral surgery in a large metropolitan 
teaching hospital, the interns are engaged 
in other activities directly related to oral 
surgery. They participate in Oral Surgery, 
Pathology and Oral Surgery-Orthodontic 
conferences as well as a three-month assign- 
ment to the Department of Anesthesiology. 
During the summer, between their first and 
second year, they divide their time be- 
tween clinical teaching of Oral Surgery in 
the School of Dentistry, an assignment to 
the Shock-Trauma Unit of University Hos- 
pital and vacation. The second year of the 
program is an assistant residency at the 
University of Maryland Hospital and 
School of Dentistry. Graduate instruction 
in Head & Neck Anatomy, Advanced Oral 
Pathology, Clinical Pathology, Physical Di- 
agnosis, Pharmacology, Physiology, and 
Microbiology is offered. The assistant resi- 



dents participate in undergraduate dental 
student instruction during the academic 
year in the Oral Surgery clinic in the 
School of Dentistry. In addition, they are 
introduced to major oral surgery proce- 
dures in the operating room. The third 
year is a 12-month residency at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Hospital and other 
affiliated hospitals. The residents are re- 
sponsible for supervising interns and assist- 
ant residents and assume responsibility for 
care of hospitalized patients. Residents ro- 
tate on a four month basis to University of 
Maryland Hospital, Baltimore City Hospi- 
tals, Mercy Hospital and Provident Hospi- 
tal. They also spend one month on the 
Maxillo-Facial service of Hospital de Em- 
pleado in Lima, Peru. During this year, 
they participate in all conferences held by 
the department and receive advanced in- 
struction in Oral Surgery. Research is con- 
sidered an important factor and all trainees 
are expected to complete an original re- 
search project. A Master of Science degree 
is offered as an option. 

Orthodontics. The postgraduate pro- 
gram in orthodontics is designed to pre- 
pare a qualified dental graduate for the 
specialty practice of orthodontics and 
meets the requirements for specialty train- 
ing of the American Board of Orthodontics 
and the Council on Dental Education of 
the American Dental Association. The 23- 
month program which begins in July of 
each year is planned to provide both the 
clinical experience and essential didactic 
theory. The clinical experience, supervised 
by the faculty, is practiced on patients 
representing a variety of malocclusions and 
other craniofacial deformities. Although 
edgewise techniques are emphasized, other 
appropriate methods of mechanical ther- 
apy are presented. In addition to the ortho- 
dontic courses given within the Depart- 
ment, there are courses and seminars given 
by other faculty within the School of 
Dentistry and the University of Maryland. 
Students are also required to attend semi- 



School of Dentistry/ 33 



nars at other Universities and the National 
Institutes of Health. Research activity is an 
integral part of the educational program in 
orthodontics. The students are required to 
initiate and complete an original and inde- 
pendent investigation. 

Pedodontics. The postgraduate pedo- 
dontic program is of two years' duration 
and meets the requirements for specialty 
training of the American Board of Pedo- 
dontics and the Council on Dental Educa- 
tion of the American Dental Association. 
The major sites of training include the 
School of Dentistry and its affiliated hos- 
pitals, the John F. Kennedy Institute, an 
affiliate of The Johns Hopkins University 
and the Maryland School for the Blind. 
Each student is required to take a mini- 
mum of 30 hours of academic courses dur- 
ing his postgraduate education. These are 



offered by the School of Dentistry and the 
other component Schools of the Health 
Sciences Center of the University of Mary- 
land. The scope of training is comprehen- 
sive. The hospital portion includes instruc- 
tion in hospital and operating room 
protocol and the rendering of rehabilitative 
dental care under general anesthesia. All 
phases of pediatric dentistry, including the 
care of handicapped children and intercep- 
tive orthodontics, are provided under the 
direction and supervision of the Faculty of 
the Department of Pedodontics. Individual 
private operations, a departmental library, 
seminar room and laboratory facilities are 
available for the exclusive use of students. 
Each student participates in pedodontic 
seminars, laboratory sessions, and teaching 
experiences on a regular basis. In addition, 
extensive training is provided in major 




34/ University of Maryland 



facets of pediatrics, child psychiatry, phar- 
macology and otolaryngology in the School 
of Medicine and Pharmacy. As an educa- 
tional medium, each student is required to 
pursue and complete an original research 
project. 

Periodontics. The graduate program in 
periodontics is designed for a certificate, 
qualifying the participant to practice and 
teach the specialty of periodontics and to 
make him board eligible in the American 
Academy of Periodontology. The program 
is 24 months in duration and is divided 
into courses of didactic and clinical peri- 
odontics, related basic science courses, and 
a correlation of courses in other dental 
specialties necessary for the prudent prac- 
tice of periodontology. A course of instruc- 
tion of 2880 hours is designed in an inte- 
grated manner with the biologic and 
clinical sciences presented concurrently 
throughout the two years. A minimum of 
1,000 hours is provided for clinical instruc- 
tion in periodontics and the didactic 
courses are conducted by lecture and semi- 
nar sessions. Advanced students also partic- 
ipate in undergraduate dental student in- 
struction and an original clinical research 
project. A Master's Degree in one of the 
basic sciences can also be arranged with 
an additional time requirement and a basic 
science research thesis. 

Prosthodontics. The 24-month program 
in prosthodontics is designed to provide 
the student with advanced education in 
the clinical practice of fixed and removable 
prosthodontics based on sound biologic 
principles. A core of basic biologic science 
courses is presented in conjunction with 
clinical disciplines directly related to the 
specialty of prosthodontics. Graduate 
course work in oral pathology, oral histol- 
ogy, microbiology, biochemistry, pharma- 
cology, and head and neck anatomy are 
correlated with special clinical programs in 
surgery, occlusion, periodontics, the tem- 
poromandibular joint, and maxillo-facial 
prosthesis. These are in addition to the 



advanced prosthodontic courses in fixed 
partial denture and complete and remov- 
able partial denture techniques. The total 
clock hours are 1870 including a research 
project as part of a course in research 
methods. 

It is anticipated that postgraduate pro- 
grams' matriculation will be between 50 
and 70 students in the near future. This 
will mean that the University of Maryland 
will be fulfilling its obligation to Maryland 
and the nation to educate competent spe- 
cialists in all areas of clinical dentistry. 

CONTINUING 
EDUCATION 

The continuing education program at the 
School of Dentistry is a formalized pro- 
gram administered by a Director to provide 
opportunities for the graduate to continue 
his education in order to maintain and im- 
prove his professional competency. The 
program consists of courses of one or more 
days' duration on either a full-time or 
intermittent basis covering all disciplines of 
dentistry. The objective is to provide the 
graduate with information and knowledge 
not only in the technical advancements in 
clinical practice, but also the biologic, 
social and behavioral sciences related to 
practice. 

Clinical, laboratory and classroom spaces 
in the School have been specifically de- 
signed and provided for the continuing 
education program. Clinical participation, 
closed circuit TV, and other education 
communication media are utilized. 

The continuing education courses are 
conducted by the School's faculty, visiting 
faculty, and distinguished practitioners 
from all sections of the country. The pro- 
grams are conducted at the School and off- 
campus in several localities in Maryland 
and surrounding states. Dental auxiliaries 
may register for most courses and some 
courses are specifically programmed for the 
auxiliaries. 



DENTAL 
HYGIENE PROGRAM 




The School of Dentistry offers only a four- 
year baccalaureate degree program in den- 
tal hygiene. The curriculum includes two 
years of preprofessional courses, a third 
year of intensive dental and dental hygiene 
study with clinical application, and a 
fourth year of advanced clinical practice 
and upper division electives in a recom- 
mended area of study, which will consti- 
tute a minor related to a specialized area 
of dental hygiene practice. The first two 
years of the preprofessional curriculum in- 
clude general education requirements of 
the University of Maryland, dental hygiene 
education accreditation requirements, and 



elective lower division courses in one of the 
recommended minor areas of study. 
COMPLETION OF THE TWO-YEAR 
PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM AT 
ONE OF THE THREE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND CAMPUSES (COLLEGE 
PARK, EASTERN SHORE, OR BALTI- 
MORE COUNTY) OR AT ANOTHER 
UNIVERSITY IS REQUIRED FOR ELI- 
GIBILITY TO APPLY FOR ENROLL- 
MENT AS A JUNIOR STANDING 
STUDENT IN THE SCHOOL OF DEN- 
TISTRY ON THE BALTIMORE CAM- 
PUS. A suggested course sequence for the 
four vears follows : 



36/ University of Maryland 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

1st 2nd 

Course Title Semester Semester 

* fEnglish — Composition 3 

* fChemistry — General 4 4 

•Philosophy 3 

°Math . . . . : 3 

* tPsychology — General 3 

Zoology — General ( prerequisite for Anatomy and 

Physiology 4 

^English — Literature 3 

* tSociology — Introduction 3 

Elective 3 

•P.E. 2-4 (1) (1) 

Totals ~16~ ~17~ 

* General Education Requirement, 
t Dental Hygiene Prerequisite. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

•History 

•English — Literature 

f Zoology — Human Anatomy and Physiology 

t Nutrition — For Health Science Majors 

fMicrobiology 

Electives in selected minors ( lower division ) 

•Health— Health Education 

Totals 

JUNIOR YEAR 

DHyg 330 Oral Biology 

DHyg 331 Oral Pathobiology 

DPhr 332 General Pharmacology and Oral Therapeutics 

DHyg 333 Prevention and Control of Oral Disease 

DHyg 334 Methods and Materials in Dentistry 

DHyg 335 Principles of Dental Hygiene Practice 

DHyg 336-7 Patients and the Community 

Totals 

SENIOR YEAR 

DHyg 340-1 Advanced Clinical Practice 

Electives 

Totals 



16 



17 



3 
12 



3 

4 

4 
6 

17 



15 



2 

7 
3 
2 
3 

17 



3 
12 

15 



38/ University of Maryland 



Although courses may be interchanged 
during the first two years, it is recom- 
mended that Chemistry precede Microbiol- 
ogy and Nutrition to enable its application 
to these two subjects. It should be noted 
that General Zoology is a prerequisite for 
Human Anatomy and Physiology at the 
University of Maryland. Among the Philos- 
ophy courses offered at the University, the 
following, listed in order of preference, are 
considered to be the most appropriate for 
the education of the dental hygienists: 
Philosophy — Ethics, Philosophy — Elemen- 
tary Logic and Semantics or Philosophy — 
Introduction. 

To prepare for upper division courses in 
the student's minor during the senior year, 
the 12 hours of lower division electives 
should be taken in one of the following 
areas of study: Basic Sciences, Social Sci- 
ences, or Health Education. Lower division 
courses in one of these minors will be ac- 
cepted as prerequisites for upper division 
courses in Education, should this minor be 
elected during the senior year. It is also 
possible for a student to complete preden- 
tistry requirements in lieu of a specific 
minor. The Department of Dental Hygiene 
Faculty will advise students in the selec- 
tion of courses for one of the recommended 
minors. 

Dental Hygiene course descriptions are 
contained in this bulletin on pages 41-42 . 

ADMISSIONS AND 

APPLICATION 

PROCEDURES 

High School Students. High school stu- 
dents who wish to enroll in the predental 
hygiene curriculum should request appli- 
cations directly from the Admissions Office 
of the University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742; the University of 
Maryland, Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens 
Avenue, Catonsville, Maryland 21228; or 
the University of Maryland — Eastern 
Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 21853. 



Young women or men who wish to pre- 
pare for a baccalaureate degree program 
in dental hygiene should pursue an aca- 
demic program in high school, including 
the following recommended subjects: Biol- 
ogy, Chemistry, Math and Physics. 

Predental Hygiene Students. Predental 
hygiene students who have completed 
three semesters of the preprofessional cur- 
riculum should request an application at 
the end of their third semester from the 
Department of Dental Hygiene, University 
of Maryland School of Dentistry, Balti- 
more, Maryland 21201. Applications for the 
Baltimore Campus should be received no 
later than June 1 prior to the fall semester 
for which the student wishes to enroll. 

Only those students who have success- 
fully completed the two-year preprofes- 
sional curriculum at one of the three 
University of Maryland campuses or an- 
other college or university will be eligible 
for admission to the School of Dentistry. 
Registration in the preprofessional curricu- 
lum does not assure the student of accept- 
ance in the dental hygiene program. All 
applicants will be required to submit Den- 
tal Hygiene Aptitude Test scores (DHAT 
information is available from the Depart- 
ment of Dental Hygiene ) and to appear for 
a personal interview at the discretion of 
the Dental Hygiene Committee on Admis- 
sions. A minimum of C average in the 
preprofessional curriculum will be re- 
quired, and preference will be given those 
students who have maintained high scho- 
lastic records. 

Registered Dental Hygienists. Regis- 
tered dental hygienists, who have com- 
pleted a two-year accredited dental 
hygiene program at another college or 
university should apply to enroll in the 
preprofessional curriculum at one of the 
three University of Maryland campuses 
listed above. Upon completion of the gen- 
eral education, basic and social science, 
and elective requirements at the University 
of Maryland, dental hygiene credits will be 



School of Dentistry / 39 



evaluated for transferability by the School 
of Dentistry and the Baltimore Campus 
Director of Admissions. Registered dental 
hygienists should write directly to the 
Department of Dental Hygiene for addi- 
tional information. 



GRADUATION 
REQUIREMENTS 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree 
must complete General Education require- 
ments, dental hygiene prerequisites in the 
preprofessional curriculum, dental hygiene 
course requirements at the School of Den- 
tistry, and elective courses in a minor area 
of study totaling 36 semester credit hours, 
of which at least 18 must be in upper 
division courses. Residency requirements 
stipulate that the last 30 semester credits 
must be taken at the University of Mary- 
land, with 12 credits taken in upper divi- 
sion courses and a minimum of 12 in the 
student's minor. An average of C in both 
the preprofessional and professional curric- 
ula is required for graduation. Academic 
progress, attendance and financial obliga- 
tion will be governed by the policies of the 
School of Dentistry. Upon eligibility for 
graduation, the student will be awarded a 
Bachelor of Science degree. 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Financial aid, in the form of scholarships, 
grants and loans, is awarded to young men 
and women and is based upon apparent 
academic ability and financial need. Recip- 
ients of financial aid are expected to make 
satisfactory progress toward attainment of 
a degree and to abide by all academic and 
non-academic regulations of the University. 
In the case of new students, applicants 
must have applied for admission to the 
University before the financial aid applica- 
tion can be reviewed. No awards are 
granted until approval is received from the 



Director of Admissions. New students at 
College Park must apply for financial aid 
before March 15. Students already enrolled 
at College Park must apply before May 1. 

Requests for information about and ap- 
plications for financial aid for predental 
hygiene students should be addressed to 
the Student Aid Office at the campus to 
which the student is admitted. Dental 
hygiene students (junior and senior stand- 
ing) should write to the Student Aid 
Office, University of Maryland, Baltimore 
Campus, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

State Grants. In an attempt to meet the 
ever increasing needs of students, the State 
of Maryland Legislature allocates funds to 
the University each year earmarked for 
student assistance. As a result, State Grants 
are available to disadvantaged students 
who demonstrate a financial need. Awards 
are made on an individual basis after care- 
ful review of the student's current financial 
situation. 

Educational Opportunity Grants. Un- 
der provisions of the Higher Education Act 
of 1965, limited grants are available to en- 
courage youths of exceptional financial 
need to continue their post-secondary 
school education. A recipient must be a 
United States citizen enrolled as a full-time 
undergraduate. 

National Defense Education Act Loans. 
This loan fund was established by the 
Federal Government to make low-interest 
loans available to students with clearly 
established financial need. Applicants must 
be United States nationals (citizens and 
permanent resident status), and must be 
enrolled for eight or more credit hours. 

Loans are reviewed on an annual basis 
and vary in amount depending on the 
student's financial need. Students are not 
assessed interest premiums until they grad- 
uate and begin repayment. Repayments 
begin one year after graduation and must 
be completed within ten years from that 
time. Current interest is charged at the 
rate of 3 percent per annum. The debt is 



40/ University of Maryland 



cancelled in case of death or permanent 
and total disability. If the borrower be- 
comes a full-time teacher (elementary, 
secondary or college), ten percent of the 
loan can be cancelled for each year of 
teaching, not to exceed 50 percent of the 
loan. However, if the teaching involves 
handicapped students or is in a predomi- 
nantly low-income area school, fifteen per- 
cent annual cancellation is allowed to the 
full amount of the loan. 

Bank Loans. Loan programs have been 
established through the Maryland Higher 
Education Loan Corporation and the 
United Student Aid Fund which permit 
students to borrow money from their home 
town banks. Undergraduates in good stand- 
ing may borrow up to $1,250 per year to 
assist in meeting their educational ex- 
penses. Borrowers begin repayment ten 
months after graduation or withdrawal from 



school. At the present time, simple interest 
is charged at the rate of 7 percent. Further 
details may be secured from the Office of 
Student Aid. 

General State Tuition Scholarships. The 
General Assembly of Maryland provides a 
number of limited tuition scholarships to 
students entering college for the first time. 
The scholarships may be used in any ap- 
proved institution of higher education 
within the State. At the University of 
Maryland, they cover the items listed as 
fixed charges. Awards are made by the 
State Scholarship Board based upon finan- 
cial need and the results of a competitive 
examination, usually given during the 
month of November. For additional infor- 
mation, contact high school guidance 
counselors or the Maryland State Scholar- 
ship Board, 2100 Guilford Avenue, Balti- 
more, Maryland 21218. 




School of Dentistry 1 41 



General Assembly Grants. These grants 
are awarded by members of the State Leg- 
islature. They may be awarded to persons 
living in the legislative district which the 
Delegate or Senator represents. Awards of 
such grants are subject to approval by the 
Faculty Senate Committee for Financial 
Aid and by the Director of Admissions. 

American Dental Hygienists' Association 
Scholarship Program. The American Den- 
tal Hygienists Association administers two 
scholarship programs: the Certificate 
Scholarship Program for students entering 
the final year of a dental hygiene curricu- 
lum and the Post Dental Hygiene Scholar- 
ship Program for certificate dental hygien- 
ists who will be enrolled in a program 
leading to a baccalaureate degree. For 
information about these scholarships, con- 
tact the Department of Dental Hygiene or 
write directly to: 

American Dental Hygienists' 
Association 

211 East Chicago Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60611 

HOUSING 

Since facilities on all campuses are limited, 
assignments are made based on the dis- 
tance from home to the campus, date of 
the housing application, age and marital 
status of the student, and availability of 
space. Specific housing information for the 
College Park Campus may be obtained 
from the Housing Office, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 
Information and applications for Parsons 
Hall, the women's residence hall on the 
Baltimore Campus, may be obtained from 
the Residence Supervisor, Parsons Hall, 622 
West Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201. (Resident accommodations in Par- 
sons Hall are limited to undergraduate 
students.) Male students enrolled on the 
Baltimore Campus may arrange for living 
accommodations in the Baltimore Union, 
621 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, 



Maryland 21201. Board contracts are not 
available on the Baltimore Campus; meals 
may be purchased on an individual basis 
in the Baltimore Union or University Hos- 
pital cafeterias. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 

Professor: Barr (Supervising Dentist) 
Assistant Professors: Koch, Pepin, Stearns 

(Chairman) and Vondrak 
Assistant Clinical Professor: Sobkov 
Instructors: Howe, Kaufman and Wagner 
Clinical Instructors: McElliott and Parker 

Note: Lectures and instructional assistance are 
provided in all courses by the Chairman 
and/or faculty of other departments in the 
School of Dentistry. 

DH YG 330. ORAL BIOLOGY ( 7 ) 

The concepts of embryology and histology 
with emphasis on the head, face, and oral 
cavity and the microscopic study of these 
tissues to provide a basis for understand- 
ing gross anatomy, physiology, abnormali- 
ties or pathology, and the application of 
clinical procedures; the study of anatomic 
structures of the head, neck and oral 
cavity and applicable physiology which 
serves as a basis for determining patho- 
logic entities and establishing landmarks 
for clinical procedures; the elements of 
the morphologic characteristics and phy- 
siologic relationships of teeth and support- 
ing tissues which are necessary for under- 
standing normal functions and to serve as 
a basis for identification of oral diseases 
and abnormalities and landmarks for clin- 
ical procedures; and an introduction to 
the principles and procedures of clinical 
techniques with emphasis on the prelimi- 
nary diagnostic work-up, oral hygiene 
measures, patient education, topical fluo- 
ride applications and the oral prophylaxis. 

DHYG 331. ORAL PATHOBIOLOGY (7) 
The nature, occurrence, and etiology of 
general and oral pathologic entities and 
abnormalities with major emphasis on the 
oral cavity to provide a basis for the clin- 
ical evaluation and a rationale for diag- 
nostic and other intra-oral procedures; the 



42/ University of Maryland 



principles of the production, properties 
and effects of x-ray, concepts of radiation 
safety, and techniques for exposing and 
processing radiographs for use in the de- 
tection of pathologic conditions; the basic 
concepts and techniques for determining 
hard and soft tissue conditions, dental 
caries, periodontal disease, malocclusion, 
oral cancer, stains and accretions, and 
factors to consider before providing clin- 
ical dental hygiene services; and the 
clinical application of principles and pro- 
cedures for the prevention and control of 
oral diseases. 

DPHR 332. GENERAL PHARMACOLOGY 
AND ORAL THERAPEUTICS (2) 
Same course taken by dental students 
numbered DPHR 513. 

DHYG 333. PREVENTION AND CON- 
TROL OF ORAL DISEASES (7) 
The principles and procedures for the pre- 
vention of oral disease including dental 
health education, oral hygiene measures, 
dietary control of dental caries, use of 
fluorides and the oral prophylaxis; and 
advanced study in the etiology and control 
of periodontal disease and oral prophylaxis 
techniques. 

DHYG 334. METHODS AND MATERIALS 
IN DENTISTRY (3) 

Introduction to the science of dental mate- 
rials, including the composition and utili- 
zation of dental materials as they apply 
to clinical dental hygiene procedures, den- 
tal assisting and patient education; intro- 
duction to dental specialties and their 
relationship to dental hygiene practice; 



and the elements of dental assisting and 
office procedures. 

DHYG 335. PRINCIPLES OF DENTAL 
HYGIENE PRACTICE (2) 
The history of dentistry and dental hy- 
giene; the principles of ethics and 
jurisprudence; the philosophy, develop- 
ment of and current trends in dental 
auxiliary education; and professional de- 
velopment as it relates to the role of orga- 
nized dentistry, continuing education, 
evaluation of scientific literature, and 
research contributions. 

DHYG 336-7. PATIENTS AND THE 
COMMUNITY (3-3) 

The elements of human behavior, princi- 
ples of learning and methods of teaching 
as they relate to patient education; the 
principles of community or public dental 
health including social and political fac- 
tors affecting dentistiy, the responsibilities 
of the dental profession in the community, 
and participation in community health 
activities; and the basic principles of com- 
municating with individuals and groups; 
public speaking, public relations (includ- 
ing public information); the use of audio- 
visual aids. 

DHYG 340- 1 . ADVANCED CLINICAL 
PRACTICE (3-3) 

Senior year clinic and seminar for the 
application of all knowledge and principles 
necessary for the practice of dental hy- 
giene. Major emphasis will be given to 
preventive periodontics and patient educa- 
tion. Students will work closely with 
dental students to provide additional ori- 
entation to auxiliary utilization. 



ORGANIZATIONS 



The University of Maryland Student Den- 
tal Association. The University of Mary- 
land Student Dental Association is the 
organizational structure of the student 
body. It is presided over and governed by 
elected representatives from each class and 
is represented on appropriate committees 
of the Faculty Council. The organization 
participates in certain student-faculty ac- 
tivities and sponsors and directs all student 
social activities. It is responsible for the 
publication of the School's yearbook, The 
Mirror. The UMSDA is unique among den- 
tal student organizations in having formu- 
lated its own constitution and code of 
ethics. 

The Gorgas Odontological Society. The 
Gorgas Odontological Society was orga- 
nized in 1916 as an honorary student den- 
tal society with scholarship as a basis for 
admission. The Society was named after 
Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in 
dental education, a teacher of many years' 
experience, and during his life a great con- 
tributor to dental literature. It was with the 
idea of perpetuating his name that the 
Society adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student 
must be in the first 30 percent of his class. 
The selection of this 30 percent shall be 
based on the weighted percentage average 
system as outlined in the school regula- 
tions. The meetings, held once each month, 
are addressed by prominent dental and 
medical men, an effort being made to ob- 



tain speakers not connected with the 
University. The members have an oppor- 
tunity, even while students, to hear men 
associated with other educational institu- 
tions. 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon. Phi Chapter 
of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, honorary den- 
tal society, was chartered at the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, 
University of Maryland during the session 
of 1928—29. Membership in the society is 
awarded to a number not exceeding 12 per- 
cent of the graduating class. This honor is 
conferred upon students who through their 
professional course of study creditably ful- 
fill all obligations as students, and whose 
conduct, earnestness, evidence of good 
character and high scholarship recommend 
them to election. 

The Aisenberg Research Society. The 
Aisenberg Research Society was founded in 
1967 by dental students interested in shar- 
ing research ideas with prominent dental 
researchers and each other. The Society 
was named after the eminent investigator 
and former Dean of the University of 
Maryland School of Dentistry, Dr. Myron 
S. Aisenberg. With scholarship and re- 
search experience as the main criteria for 
membership, the Society invites to mem- 
bership all students of all classes who have 
participated in fellowships either at the 
School of Dentistry or some other research 
institution. 



44/ University of Maryland 



Gamma Pi Delta. Chartered in 1965, 
Gamma Pi Delta is an honorary student 
dental organization with scholarship and 
interest in the field of prosthetic dentistry 
as a basis for admission. The objective of 
the organization is the advancement of 



prosthetic dentistry through lectures, table 
clinics, and other academic activities with 
its main theme directed towards stimulat- 
ing the creative interest of the students and 
the profession in general. 




School of Dentistry / 45 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHAIRMAN 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

3505 Fallstaff Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21215 

VICE CHAIRMAN 

Mr. Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville & Case, 17th Floor, One Charles 

Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

SECRETARY 

Mr. B. Herbert Brown 

4401 Roland Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

TREASURER 

Mr. Harry H. Nuttle 

Denton, Maryland 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Mrs. Alice H. Morgan 

6408 Drummond Avenue, Chevy Chase, Maryland 

20015 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Mr. F. Grove Miller, Jr. 

Route #1, Box #133, North East, Maryland 

21901 

Mrs. Michael J. Deegan, Jr. 

307 Great Falls Road, Rockville, Maryland 20850 

Mr. George C. Fry 
Cecilton, Maryland 21913 

Dr. Samuel H. Hoover 

507 Chadwick Road, Timonium, Maryland 21093 

Mr. Edward V. Hurley 

Commission on Human Relations, Mount Vernon 

Building, 701 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Maryland 

21202 

Mr. Hugh A. McMullen 

Geppert and McMullen, 21 Prospect Square 

Cumberland, Maryland 21502 

Mr. L. Mercer Smith 

5113 Falls Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

Dr. Emerson C. Walden 

4200 Edmondson Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 

21229 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 

PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins — B.A., University of Texas, 
1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford University, 
1936; D.Phil., 1936 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, 

Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio State University, 

1936; Ph.D., 1942. 



VICE PRESIDENT FOR 
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 
Walter B. Waetjen — B.S., Millersville State 
College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; M.S., 
University of Pennsylvania, i947; Ed.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1951. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GRADUATE 
STUDIES AND RESEARCH 
Michael J. Pelczar, Jr. — B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., State Univer- 
sity of Iowa, 1941. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR 
AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr. — B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 



OFFICERS OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
AT BALTIMORE 

THE PRESIDENT OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Wilson H. Elkins — B.A., University of Texas, 

1932; M.A., 1932; B.Lit., Oxford University, 1936; 

D.Phil., 1936. 

CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 
Albin O. Kuhn — B.S., University of Maryland, 
1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

THE PRINCIPAL ACADEMIC OFFICERS 

John J. Salley, Dean, School of Dentistry, 
D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., 
University of Rochester, 1954. 

John P. Lambooy, Dean, Graduate Studies and 
Research B.A., Kalamazoo College, 1937; M.S., 
1938; M.A., University of Illinois, 1939; Ph.D., 
University of Rochester, 1942. 

William P. Cunningham, Dean, School of Law, 
A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law 
School, 1948. 

John H. Moxley, III, Dean, School of Medicine, 
A.B., 1957, Williams College; M.D., University of 
Colorado, 1961. 

Marion I. Murphy, Dean, School of Nursing, 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1936; M.P.H., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1946; Ph.D., 1959. 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., Dean, School of Phar- 
macy, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 
1955; Ph.D., Purdue University, 1957. 

Daniel Thursz, Dean, School of Social Work and 
Community Planning, B.A., Queens College, 1948; 
M.S.W., Catholic University, 1955; D.S.W., 1959. 

George H. Yeager, Director, University of Mary- 
land Hospital, B.S., University of West Virginia, 
1925; M.D., University of Maryland, 1929. 



46/ University of Maryland 

OFFICERS FOR CENTRAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR 

W. Jackson Stengeb — B.A., Washington College, 

1949; M.A., Georgetown University, 1959; Ph.D., 

1965. 

ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR 
Roy Borom— B.A., Wooster College, 1949; 
M.S.S.A., Western Reserve School of Applied So- 
cial Sciences, 1951. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND 

REGISTRATIONS 

Wayne A. Smith — B.S., University of Maryland, 

1962. 

DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS SERVICES 
Robert C. Brown — B.A., University of Maryland, 
1963. 

DIRECTOR, HEALTH SCIENCES 
COMPUTER CENTER 

Robert L. Jones — A.B., Hiram College, 1958; 
M.S., Syracuse University, 1961. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

John L. O'Neill — B.A., University of Maryland, 
1960; M.S., George Washington University, 1968. 

DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL PLANT 
Robert L. Walton — B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1938. 

DIRECTOR, STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 
Wilfred H. Townshend — B.A., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1936; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1940. 

DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

Beth Wilson — A.B., University of Nebraska, 

1930. 

LIBRARIAN AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Hilda E. Moore — B.A., Randolph-Macon Wom- 
en's College, 1936; B.S., Emory University Library 
School 1937. 



OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL 
OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley, Dean 

D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., 
University of Rochester, 1954. 

Charles E. Barr, Associate Dean 

A.B., University of Virginia, 1950; D.D.S., 
Medical College of Virginia, 1954; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1961. 

Martin Lumx, Associate Dean for Academic 
Affairs 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1938; D.D.S., 
Washington University, 1950; M.P.H., Colum- 
bia University, 1952. 



John F. Hasler, Assistant Dean for Clinical Affairs 
B.S., Indiana University, 1958; D.D.S., 1962; 
M.S.D., 1969. 

Charles T. Pridgeon, Assistant Dean for Continu- 
ing Education 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 

Joseph C. Biddix, Jr., Assistant to the Dean 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1934. 

William E. Hahn, Director of Admissions 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1931; A.B., 
University of Rochester, 1938; M.S., 1939. 

Riley S. Williamson, Jr., Director of Basic Den- 
tal Science 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1942. 

THE FACULTY— 1972-1974 
SESSION 

EMERITI 

Myron S. Aisenrerg, D.D.S., Dean Emeritus 
J. Ben Rohinson, D.D.S., D.Sc, Dean Emeritus 
Edward C. Dorrs, D.D.S., B.S., Professor Emeri- 
tus 
Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
Ernest B. Xuttall, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
L. Edward Warner, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
George McLean, M.D., Associate Professor Emer- 
itus 
Ida M. Rorinson, A.B., B.S.L.S., Librarian Emer- 
itus 

PROFESSORS 

Irving I. Arramson, Professor of Restorative 
Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1932. 

Charles E. Barr, Professor of Periodontics 

A.B., University of Virginia, 1950; D.D.S., 
Medical College of Virginia, 1954; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1961. 

Joseph C. Biddix, Jr., Professor of Oral Pathology 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1934. 

Raymond M. Burgison, Professor of Pharmacol- 
ogy 

B.S., Loyola College, 1945; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1948; Ph.D., 1950. 

George Entwisle, Professor of Preventive Medi- 
cine and Rehabilitation 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1945; M.D., 
Boston University, 1948. 

William E. Hahn, Professor of Anatomy 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1931; A.B., 
University of Rochester, 1938; M.S., 1939. 

Martin Helrich, Professor of Anesthesiology 
B.S., Dickinson College, 1946; M.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

Frank C. Jerbi, Professor of Restorative Dentistry 
D.D.S., Loyola University (Chicago), 1939. 

Martin Lunin, Professor of Oral Pathology 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1938; D.D.S., 



School of Dentistry/ 47 



Washington University, 1950; M.P.H., Colum- 
bia University, 1952. 

George W. Piavis, Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1948; M.Ed., 
1952; Ph.D., Duke University, 1958. 

Burton R. Pollack, Professor of Community 
Dentistry 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1946; LL.B., 
1959; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1967. 

Charles T. Pridgeon, Professor of Periodontics 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 

D. Vincent Provenza, Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; 
Ph.D., 1952. 

Wilbur O. Ramsey, Professor of Restorative Den- 
tistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Harry M. Robinson, Jr., Professor of Dermatol- 
ogy 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1931; M.D., 1935. 

John J. Salley, Professor of Oral Pathology 

D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1954. 

Donald E. Shay, Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1938; Ph.D., 1943. 

John I. White, Professor of Physiology 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1939; Ph.D., 
Rutgers University, 1950. 

Riley S. Williamson, Jr., Professor of Restorative 
Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1942. 

Theodore E. Woodward, Professor of Medicine 
B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1934; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1938. 



PROFESSORS 

Barry, Associate Professor of Anat- 



1955; Ph.D., University of 



ASSOCIATE 

SuE-NlNG C. 

omy 

B.S., Barat College, 

Maryland, 1961. 
I. Norton Brotman, Associate Clinical Professor 

of Oral Pathology 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1936. 
Joseph P. Cappuccio, Associate Professor of Oral 

Surgery 

B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1943; D.D.S., 

University of Maryland, 1946. 
Suresh C. Choudhary, Associate Professor of 

Restorative Dentistry 

F.Sc, G. M. Memorial College (India), 1951; 

B.D.S., Sir C.E.M. Dental College (India), 

1955; M.S., Marquette University, 1963; D.D.S., 

1967. 
Edward F. Cotter, Associate Professor of Medi- 
cine 

M.D., University of Maryland, 1935. 
Duane T. DeVore, Associate Professor of Oral 

Surgery 

D.D.S., Loyola University (Chicago), 1956. 
Frank A. Dolle, Associate Professor of Pharma- 
cology 



B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 1950; 

Ph.D., 1954; D.D.S., 1959. 
Charles J. Donnelly, Associate Professor of 

Community Dentistry 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1942; D.D.S., 

1945; M.P.H., 1948. 
Stanley H. Dosh, Associate Professor of Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 
Donald J. Forrester, Associate Professor of 

Pedodontics 

D.D.S., Western Reserve University, 1960; 

M.S.D., University of Washington, 1964. 
Frank M. Ganis, Associate Professor of Biochem- 
istry 

A.B., University of Rochester, 1949; Ph.D., 

1956. 
Russell Gigliotti, Associate Professor of Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1945. 
Marvin M. Graham, Associate Clinical Professor 

of Restorative Dentistry 

A.B., Cornell University, 1938; A.M., 1939; 

D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1943. 
John M. Grewe, Associate Professor of Ortho- 
dontics 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1960; D.D.S., 

1962; M.S.D., 1964; Ph.D., 1966. 
Lawrence F. Halpert, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Periodontics 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958; 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 
McDonald K. Hamilton, Associate Professor of 

Oral Surgery 

A.B., Alma College, 1952; D.D.S., University 

of Michigan, 1956. 
John F. Hasler, Associate Professor of Oral 

Diagnosis 

B.S., Indiana University', 1958; D.D.S., 1962; 

M.S.D., 1969. 
Joseph R. Horn, Associate Professor of Oral 

Pathology 

D.D.S., Columbia University, 1926. 
George W. Kidder III, Associate Professor of 

Physiology 

A.B., Amherst College, 1956; Ph.D., University 

of Pennsylvania, 1961. 
Francis J. Kihn, Associate Clinical Professor of 

Pedodontics 

B.S., Loyola College, 1952; D.D.S., University 

of Maryland, 1956. 
William Kress, Associate Clinical Professor of 

Orthodontics 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1936. 
George N. Krywolap, Associate Professor of 

Microbiology 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, I960; 

M.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1962; 

Ph.D., 1964. 
Charles B. Leonard, Jr., Associate Professor of 

Biochemistry 

B.A., Rutgers College of South Jersey, 1955; 

M.S., University of Maryland, 1957; Ph.D., 

1964. 



48/ University of Maryland 



George A. Lentz, Jr., Associate Clinical Professor 
of Community Dentistry 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1957. 

Ephraim T. Lisansky, Associate Clinical Professor 
of Community Dentistry 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1933; 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1937. 

Peter McLean-Lu, Associate Professor of Re- 
storative Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1934. 

Ernest F. Moreland, Associate Professor of Den- 
tal Education 

B.S., University of Georgia, 1960; M.A., West- 
ern Carolina University, 1962; Ed.D., Indiana 
University, 1967. 

J. Philip Norris, Associate Clinical Professor of 
Restorative Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; D.D.S., 
1956. 

Donald L. Olson, Associate Professor of Oral 
Diagnosis 
D.D.S., Columbia University, 1957. 

David N. Plessett, Associate Clinical Professor 
of Periodontics 

B.A., Penn State University, 3949; D.D.S., 
Temple Dental School, 1954. 

Leonard Rapoport, Associate Clinical Professor 
of Community Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; D.D.S., 
1947. 

Morris Roseman, Associate Professor of Com- 
munity Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.A., 1943; 
Ph.D., Duke University, 1949. 

Frdzda G. Rudo, Associate Professor of Pharma- 
cology 

A.B., Goucher College, 1944; M.S., University 
of Maryland, I960; Ph.D., 1963. 

Francis J. Samaha, Associate Clinical Professor 
of Periodontics 
D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1951. 

Rodger F. Sisca, Associate Professor of Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1955; D.D.S., 
1962; M.S., 1963; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1967. 

Glenn D. Steele, Associate Professor of Restora- 
tive Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1942. 

James R. Swancar, Associate Professor of Oral 
Pathology 

B.A., Western Reserve University, 1952; D.D.S., 
1956; M.S., 1963. 

D. Robert Swinehart, Associate Clinical Profes- 
sor of Orthodontics 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1933; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1937. 

Robert J. Sydiskis, Associate Professor of Micro- 
biology 

B.A., University of Bridgeport, 1961; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University, 1965. 

Edmond G. Vanden Bosche, Associate Professor 
of Restorative Dentistry 



B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1943; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1947. 
M. Yameen ZuBAmi, Associate Research Professor 
of Riochemistry 

B.S., University of Karachi, 1957; M.S., 1958; 
M.S., University of Minnesota, 1962; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin, 1965. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Ramzi G. Anton, Assistant Professor of Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

B.D.S., University of Bagdad, 1958; M.S.D., 
University of Detroit, 1965; D.D.S., Howard 
University, 1971. 

David S. August, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Restorative Dentistry 
D.D.S., Temple University, 1964. 

Sophia A. Balis, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Pedodontics 

D.D.S., University of Athens (Greece), 1957; 
D.D.S., University of Toronto, 1966. 

Nasir BASHmELAHi, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry 

B.S., Tehran University, 1960; Pharm.D., 1962; 
M.S.; University of Louisville, 1965; Ph.D., 
1968. 

Todd Beckerman, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Pathology 

B.A., Emory University, 1959; D.D.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1963. 

Robert B. Bennett, Assistant Professor of Physi- 
ology 

B.A., Carleton College, 1960; M.S., University 
of Nebraska, 1963; Ph.D., 1967. 

Stewart A. Bergman, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Surgery 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1964; D.D.S., State 
University of New York, 1968. 

K. Evans Bethea, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Restorative Dentistry 

B.S., Morgan State College, 1961; D.D.S., 
Meharry Medical College, 1968. 

Jordan S. Bloom, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Oral Pathology 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1949; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Ronald S. Branoff, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Orthodontics 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966; M.S.D., 
Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1970. 

Samuel H. Bryant, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Oral Pathology 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1928; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1932. 

George F. Buchness, Assistant Professor of Re- 
storative Dentistry 

B.S., Loyola College, 1948; M.S., Catholic Uni- 
versity of America, 1954; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1961. 

John Carr, Assistant Professor of Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., Howard University, 1948; D.D.S., Meharry 
Medical College, 1953. 



School of Dentistry / 49 



Yung-Feng Chang, Assistant Professor of Micro- 
biology 

B.S., National Taiwan University, 1958; M.S., 
I960; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1966. 

Simon A. Courtade, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1949; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1952; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester, 1965. 

James F. Craig, Assistant Professor of Dental 
Education 

B.S., Western Illinois University, 1968; M.S., 
Indiana University, 1970; Ed.D., 1972. 

Harold L. Crossley, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macology 

B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1964; M.S., 
1969; Ph.D., 1972. 

Jerome S. Cullen, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Orthodontics 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1941. 

Allan L. Delisle, Assistant Professor of Micro- 
biology 

B.S., University of California, 1960; M.S., 1961; 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1968. 

Jose H. Diaz, Assistant Professor of Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1941; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1950. 

John R. Dopson, Assistant Professor of Restora- 
tive Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1963. 

Alex Drabkowski, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Community Dentistry 

B.A., Wayne State University, 1951; D.D.S., 
University of Detroit, 1955; M.P.H., University 
of Michigan, 1967. 

Gwendolyn F. Dunn, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Orthodontics 

B.A., Dillard University, 1964; D.D.S., Meharry 
Medical College, 1970; M.S., State University 
of New York, 1972. 

Pat Fetchero, Assistant Professor of Restorative 
Dentistry 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1949; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1952. 

James E. Fleming, Assistant Professor of Pedo- 
dontics 

B.S., Western Kentucky University, 1962; M.S., 
University of Kentucky, 1963; D.M.D., 1967. 

Lawrence A. Fox, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Pedodontics 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1960; D.D.S., 
1964. 

Leslie P. Gartner, Assistant Professor of Anat- 
omy 

B.A., Neward College of Arts and Sciences, 
Rutgers University, 1965; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 
1970. 

Edward M. Goldman, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Orthodontics 
D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1967. 

John I. Golski. Assistant Professor of Periodontics 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 



Stephen I. Green, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 
D.D.S., Temple University, 1965. 

Edward L. Halpern, Assistant Professor of Perio- 
dontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., 
1967; M.S.D., Georgetown University, 1967. 

Robert W. Haroth, Assistant Professor of Re- 
storative Dentistry 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1958; M.Ed., 
1972. 

Lawrence A. Haskins, Assistant Professor of 
Periodontics 

B.S., University of Georgia, 1966; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1970. 

Arthur L. Hayden, Assistant Professor of Com- 
munity Dentistry 
D.M.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1945. 

Hans-Caspar Hirzel, Visiting Assistant Professor 
of Orthodontics 
D.M.D., University of Zurich, 1969. 

Donald J. Hobart, Assistant Professor of Anat- 
omy 

B.S., Western Maryland College, 1962; M.S.. 
University of Maryland, 1967; Ph.D., 1972. 

Daniel Jacobs, Assistant Clinical Professor of Re- 
storative Dentistry 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1959; D.D.S., 
1959. 

Dean C. Johnson, Assistant Professor of Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1963; M.S.D., 
University of Indiana, 1969. 

Robert H. Johnson, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Surgery 

B.A., Duke University, 1954; M.D., University 
of Maryland, 1958. 

Christina M. Koch, Assistant Professor of Dental 
Hygiene 

B.S., University of Detroit, 1969; M.A., George 
Washington University, 1971. 

David C Kosegarten, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macology 

B.S., Union University, 1962; M.S., University 
of Rhode Island, 1966; Ph.D., 1970. 

Barry S. Lever, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954; D.D.S., 
1958. 

Bernard A. Levy, Assistant Professor of Perio- 
dontics 

A.B., Ohio University, 1963; D.D.S., Western 
Reserve University, 1966; M.S.D., Indiana Uni- 
versity, 1969. 

Herbert Livingston, Assistant Professor of Perio- 
dontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1968. 

JoAnne Livingston, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Community Dentistry 

R.D.H., Temple University, 1968; B.S.. Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, 1968; M.P.H., 1971. 

Dean E. McKinnon, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Oral Diagnosis 



50/ University of Maryland 



B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.S., Ohio 
State University, 1952; D.D.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1956. 

Philip S. Markin, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Orthodontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1963; D.D.S, 
1966; M.S., Loyola University (Chicago), 1972. 

Frank \V. Mastrola, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Restorative Dentistry 

B.A., Providence College, 1956; D.D.S. , Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1960. 

Richard M. Meszler, Assistant Professor of Anat- 
omy 

A.B., New York University College of Arts and 
Sciences, 1964; Ph.D., University of Louisville, 
1969. 

William J. Mislowsky, Assistant Professor of 
Periodontics 

B.S., Loyola College, 1963; D.D.S., Georgetown 
Dental School, 1967; M.S., 1969. 

Warren M. Morganstein, Assistant Professor of 
Restorative Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 
1969. 

Martin H. Morris, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry 

B.S., Rutgers University, 1952; M.S., 1954; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1965. 

Martin N. Narun, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1963. 

Robert K. Nauman, Assistant Professor of Micro- 
biology 

B.S., Pennsylvania University, 1963; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 

C. Daniel Overholser, Assistant Professor of 
Oral Diagnosis 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1966; D.D.S., 
Indiana University, 1970; M.S.D., 1972. 

David G. Owen, Assistant Professor of Pedodontics 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1960; D.D.S., McGill 
University, 1964; A.M., University of Chicago, 
1970. 

Donald M. Pachuta, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Pathology 

B.A., Niagara University, 1962; M.D., State 
University of New York, 1966. 

Jon K. Park, Assistant Professor of Oral Pathology 
D.D.S., University of Missouri, 1964; B.A., 
Wichita State University, 1969; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Missouri, 1971. 

Charles T. Pavlick, Jr., Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Orthodontics 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1961; D.D.S., 
1961; M.S., University of Illinois, 1966. 

JoAnne I. Pepin, Assistant Professor of Dental 
Hygiene 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1962; M.P.H., 
1969. 

Alan B. Perkin, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 
D.D.S., University of Toronto, 1962. 



Edward P. Quarantillo, Assistant Professor of 
Restorative Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1938. 

Errol L. Reese, Assistant Professor of Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., Fairmont State College, 1960; D.D.S., 
West Virginia University, 1963; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Detroit, 1968. 

Emilija Rdzkstniece, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Pathology 

D.D.S., Phillipps University of Marburg (Ger- 
many), 1949; D.M.D., 1950; M.S., University 
of California, 1963; Ph.D., 1970. 

Maurice S. Rodgers, Assistant Professor of Re- 
storative Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1938. 

Howard L. Rothschild, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Oral Pathology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., 
1963. 

Xorman C. Rutter, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Community Dentistry 

B.S., College of William and Mary, 1953; 
D.D.S, Medical College of Virginia, 1959; 
M.P.H, The Johns Hopkins University, 1964. 

Myron H. Sachs, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Community Dentistry 
D.D.S, Columbia University, 1939. 

Rajendar M. Saini, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Orthodontics 

F.Sc, Punjab University College (India); 
B.D.S, Government Dental College (India), 
1962; M.S.D, New York University, 1966; 
D.D.S, University of Toronto, 1970. 

Ramesh C. Sardana, Assistant Professor of Re- 
storative Dentistry 

B.Sc, D.A.V. College (India), 1953; B.D.S, 
King George's Medical College (India), 1960; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1966; D.D.S, 
1969. 

Louis E. Schneider, Assistant Professor of Micro- 
biology 

A.B, St. Joseph's College, 1951; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, 1957; Ph.D., 1961. 

Earle M. Schulz, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Pedodontics 

B.S, University of Maryland, 1960; D.D.S, 
1962; M.S., University of Iowa, 1972. 

Howard E. Schuntck, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Restorative Dentistry 

B.S, University of Maryland, 1961; D.D.S, 
1962. 

Joseph H. Seipp, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Orthodontics 

A.B, Loyola College, 1951; D.D.S, University 
of Maryland, 1955; M.S., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1957. 

Preston G. Shelton, Assistant Professor of Pedo- 
dontics 

B.S, John Carroll University, 1963; D.D.S, 
University of Michigan, 1967; M.S., University 
of Nebraska, 1971. 

Eli M. Shulman, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Community Dentistry 



School of Dentistry 1 51 



A.B., Ohio State University, 1942; D.D.S., 
1947. 

Theodore S. Sobkov, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Periodontics 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1958; D.D.S., 
1962. 

Rosalynde K. Soble, Assistant Professor of Com- 
munity Dentistry 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1944; M.S.W., 
1965. 

Patricia C. Stearns, Assistant Professor of Den- 
tal Hygiene 

B.S., University of Washington, 1959; M.S., 
Columbia University, 1966. 

William J. Swartz, Assistant Professor of Anat- 
omy 

B.S., University of Detroit, 1965; Ph.D., Loyola 
University, 1971. 

Van P. Thompson, Assistant Professor of Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1966; 
Ph.D., 1971. 

Donald M. Tilghman, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Surgery 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; D.D.S., 
1961. 

Barbara H. Vondrak, Assistant Professor of Den- 
tal Hygiene 
B.S., University of Iowa, 1964; M.S., 1966. 

Barlow J. Wagman, Assistant Professor of Com- 
munity Dentistry 

B.S., George Washington University, 1949; 
D.D.S., Howard University, 1953; M.P.H., 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1972. 

Mark L. Wagner, Assistant Professor of Perio- 
dontics 

A.B., Birmingham Southern College, 1959; 
D.M.D., University of Alabama, 1963. 

Harvey Webb, Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Community Dentistry 

B.S., Howard University, 1956; D.D.S., 1960; 
M.Sc., 1962; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1967. 

Jerome J. Weinstein, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Pedodontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; D.D.S., 
1962. 

George H. Williams III, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Restorative Dentistry 
B.S., Tusculum College, 1962; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1966. 

Dennis E. Winson, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1965. 

Sheldon J. Wollman, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Periodontics 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1963. 

Dale Lee Wood, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1960. 

Richard L. Wynn, Assistant Professor of Pharma- 
cology 



B.S., University of Maryland, 1966; M.S., 1966; 

Ph.D., 1970. 
Robert M. Zupnik, Assistant Clinical Professor of 

Periodontics 

D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1958. 
George A. Zurkow, Assistant Clinical Professor of 

Restorative Dentistry 

D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1939. 

INSTRUCTORS 

George C. Abraham, Instructor in Restorative 
Dentistry 

I.Sc, Nowrasjee Wadia College (India), 1958; 
B.D.S., Nair Hospital Dental College (Bombay 
University), 1964; M.S., Loma Linda University, 
1967. 

Harry Aks, Clinical Instructor in Oral Diagnosis 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1937. 

Amira H. Arafat, Instructor in Oral Pathology 
D.D.S., Damascus University (Syria), 1959; 
M.S.D., University of Maryland, 1971. 

Mark V. Barren, Clinical Instructor in Pedo- 
dontics 

A.A., University of Florida, 1963; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1968; M.S.D., Boston Uni- 
versity School of Graduate Dentistry, 1972; 
C.A.G.S, 1972. 

John E. Bonas, Instructor in Physiology 
B.S., Brooklyn College, 1956; M.A., 1963. 

Richard R. Burt, Clinical Instructor in Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

B.S., Loyola College, 1966; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1970. 

George E. Dent, Jr., Clinical Instructor in Re- 
storative Dentistry 

B.S., Georgetown University, 1961; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1965. 

Thomas B. Fahey, Clinical Instructor in Oral 
Diagnosis 

B.S., Loyola College, 1965; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1970. 

William B. Finagin, Clinical Instructor in Resto- 
rative Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1959; D.D.S., 
1963. 

Stephen A. Goldman, Clinical Instructor in Peri- 
odontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1965; D.D.S., 
1968. 

Michael J. Goode, Clinical Instructor in Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., 
University of Michigan, 1965. 

Charles W. Gossard, Clinical Instructor in Oral 
Diagnosis 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1964; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1970. 

Kristen M. Hardwick, Instructor in Dental Hy- 
giene 
B.S., University of Washington, 1965. 

Paul V. Hertzler II, Clinical Instructor in Re- 
storative Dentistry 

B.S., Juniata College, 1966; D.M.D., University 
of Pittsburgh, 1968. 



52/ University of Maryland 



James L. Hiatt, Instructor in Anatomy 

B.S., Ball State University, 1959; M.S., 1968. 

W. Dulaney Hill, Clinical Instructor in Pedo- 
dontics 
D.D.S., Howard University, 1963. 

Alvan M. Holston, Jr., Instructor in Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., 
1967. 

Rebecca L. Howe, Instructor in Dental Hygiene 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1972. 

Marilyn J. Kaufman, Instructor in Dental Hy- 
giene 
B.S., Columbia University, 1971; M.S., 1972. 

Stanley H. Klein, Clinical Instructor in Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1963; D.D.S., 
1966. 

Gus J. Livaditis, Instructor in Restorative Den- 
tistry 
D.D.S., Temple University, 1970. 

Marilyn P. McElliott, Clinical Instructor in 
Dental Hygiene 
B.S., University of Kansas City, 1957. 

Henry A. Miller, Clinical Instructor in Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1959; D.D.S., 
1964. 

Robert E. Morris, Instructor in Restorative Den- 
tistry 

A.B., College of the Holy Cross, 1965; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1969. 

Kenneth E. Mort, Clinical Instructor in Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1967; M.S., 
University of Missouri, 1970. 

Steven A. Nachman, Clinical Instructor in Oral 
Pathology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., 
1965. 

Birgit Nardell, Instructor in Physiology 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1961; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1964; Ph.D., 1969. 

Lawrence A. Nurin, Clinical Instructor in Peri- 
odontics 

B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1964; 
D.D.S., Howard University, 1968. 

M. Elaine Parker, Clinical Instructor in Dental 
Hygiene 
R.D.H., University of Detroit, 1964. 

Richard A. Reveley, Clinical Instructor in Oral 
Diagnosis 
B.A., Ohio State University, 1964; D.D.S., 1967. 

George W. Rupprecht, Clinical Instructor in 
Restorative Dentistry 

B.S., Dickinson College, 1963; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1967. 

Dalisey San Agustin, Clinical Instructor in Com- 
munity Dentistry 
D.M.D., University of the Philippines, 1946. 

Sharon E. Schwindt, Instructor in Dental Hy- 
giene 
B.S., University of Washington, 1965. 

Werner Seibel, Instructor in Anatomy 



B.A., Brooklyn College, 1965; M.A., Hofstra 
University (New York), 1968; Ph.D., Virginia 
Commonwealth University, 1972. 

Jerome W. Spechler, Instructor in Oral Pathol- 
ogy 
D.D.S., Temple University, 1969. 

Leah M. Staling, Instructor in Physiology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1944; M.S., 1948. 

Claude P. Taylor, Instructor in Dental Educa- 
tion 

Charles M. Towns, Instructor in Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., Morgan State College, 1963; D.D.S., 
Howard University, 1970. 

Raoul C. Vanden Bosche, Clinical Instructor in 
Restorative Dentistry 

A.B., College of the Holy Cross, 1962; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1966. 

John Vandenberge, Clinical Instructor in Com- 
munity Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1965; D.D.S., 
1967. 

Jack D. Vandermer, Instructor in Oral Pathology 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1963; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1967. 

Julia A. Wagner, Instructor in Dental Hygiene 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1972. 

Oswaldene E. Walker, Instructor in Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., Howard University, 1961; M.S., 1966; 
D.D.S., 1972. 

Charles Walowitz, Clinical Instructor in Re- 
storative Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1962. 

James B. Ward, Instructor in Restorative Den- 
tistry 
B.S., Howard University, 1956; D.D.S., 1963. 

Henry F. Youmatz, Clinical Instructor in Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

B.S., St. Bonaventure University, 1964; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1968. 

SPECIAL LECTURERS 

Diane Albertson, Lecturer in Pedodontics and 
Dental Hygiene 
B.A., University of Iowa, 1971. 

J. Edgar Bernstein, Lecturer in Pedodontics 
D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1956. 

Arthur Bushel, Lecturer in Community Den- 
tistry 

A.B., Brooklyn College, 1940; D.D.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1943; M.P.H., 1947. 

Jerome D. Buxbaum, Lecturer in Physiology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; D.D.S, 
1955. 

James P. Carlos, Lecturer in Community Den- 
tistry 

D.D.S., Temple University, 1954; M.P.H., Co- 
lumbia University, 1961. 

Richard L. Christiansen, Lecturer in Ortho- 
dontics 

D.D.S. , University of Iowa, 1959; M.S.D., In- 
diana University, 1964; Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota, 1970. 



School of Dentistry 1 53 



Harold R. Englander, Lecturer in Community 
Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia University, 1948; M.P.H., 
1951. 

Samuel L. Fox, Lecturer in Physiology 

B.S., University of Maryland', 1936; M.D., 1938. 

Paul D. Frazier, Lecturer in Orthodontics 

B.S., McPherson College, 1958; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Iowa, 1961; Ph.C, University of Wash- 
ington, 1969, Ph.D., 1971. 

Irving Hawkins, Jr., Lecturer in Community 
Dentistry 

B.S., Saint Mary's College, 1946; M.D., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1946. 

Carl B. Holmes, Lecturer in Community Den- 
tistry 

D.D.S., University of Tennessee, 1954; M.P.H., 
University of Miehigan, 1957. 

Edward W. Hopkins, Lecturer in Community 
Dentistry 
M.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1949. 

Conrad L. Inman, Jr., Lecturer in Community 
Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1944. 

Alfred H. Jansen, Jr., Lecturer in Microbiology 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1958; B.S., 
1962; M.S., 1968. 

Malcolm C. Johnston, Lecturer in Orthodontics 
D.D.S., University of Toronto, 1954; M.Sc.D., 
1956; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1965. 

Goldle K. Kerr, Lecturer in Community Den- 
tistry 
B.A., University of Minnesota, 1934. 

Patricia A. Landis, Lecturer in Peclodontics 

B.A, Heidelborg College, 1951; M.A, Case- 
Western Reserve University, 1956. 

Joseph P. Libonati, Lecturer in Microbiology 
M.S., Duquesne University, 1965; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1968. 

Richard Lindenberg, Lecturer in Neuroanatomy 
M.D., University of Berlin, 1944. 

H. Berton McCauley, Lecturer in Community 
Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1936. 

Victor A. McKusick, Lecturer in Oral Diagnosis 
M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1946. 

Genevieve E. Matanoski, Lecturer in Commu- 
nity Dentistry 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1951; M.D., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1955; M.P.H., 1962; 
Dr.P.H., 1964. 

Kathryn A. Moore, Lecturer in Pedodontics 

B.S., Montana State College, 1956; D.D.S., 
Washington University (Missouri), 1959; 
M.S.D., University of Washington, 1963. 

Jerry D. Niswander, Lecturer in Orthodontics 
D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1955; M.S., 
1962. 

William J. O'Donnell, Lecturer in Community 
Dentistry 

A.B., Loyola College, 1937; LL.B., University 
of Maryland, 1941. 
Henry H. Scofield, Lecturer in Oral Pathology 
B.S., Loyola University (Chicago), 1942; 



D.D.S., 1945; M.S., Georgetown University, 

1952. 
Robert B. Shfra, Lecturer in Oral Surgery 

D.D.S., Kansas City Western Dental College, 

1932. 
Merrill J. Snyder, Lecturer in Microbiology 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1950. 
Ronald J. Taylor, Lecturer in Pharmacology 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1966; 

M.S., Yeshiva University, 1968. 
Paul Weinstein, Lecturer in Community Den- 
tistry 

B.S.S., City College of New York, 1949; LL.B., 

New York University, 1952. 
Miriam Zadek, Lecturer in Community Dentistry 

B.A., Barnard College, 1950; M.S., Columbia 

University, 1952. 

ASSOCIATES 

Stanley S. Andrews, Clinical Associate in Re- 
storative Dentistry 

B.S., St. Johns University, 1961; D.D.S., New 
York University, 1965; M.S.D., University of 
Washington, 1971. 

William H. Baile, Clinical Associate in Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

B.S., Franklin & Marshall, 1960; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1964. 

Paul D. Bingham, Clinical Associate in Oral Pa- 
thology 

B.A., St. Anselm's College, 1943; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1947. 

Dennis G. Brave, Clinical Associate in Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1965; D.D.S., 
1969. 

Thomas D. Dumont, Clinical Associate in Resto- 
rative Dentistry 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1961; D.D.S., 
1965. 

Glen D. Elliott, Clinical Associate in Oral Sur- 
gery 

D.D.S., University of Tennessee, 1957; M.S.D., 
New York University, 1968. 

Dorothy E. Gallant, Research Associate in 
Community Dentistry 
B.A., University of Rochester, 1942. 

Robert Goren, Clinical Associate in Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; D.D.S., 
1958. 

David W. Heese, Clinical Associate in Pedo- 
dontics 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1953; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1960. 

Walter H. Huntington, Clinical Associate in 
Oral Pathology 

B.A., Alfred University, 1949; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Buffalo, 1951. 

John R. Iddings, Clinical Associate in Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., Roanoke College, 1962; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1966. 



54/ University of Maryland 



Philip D. Levinson, Clinical Associate in Resto- 
rative Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1965. 

Edward A. Miller, Clinical Associate in Restora- 
tive Dentistry 
D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1965. 

Thomas E. Miller, Clinical Associate in Restora- 
tive Dentistry 
D.D.S., Valley Forge, 1959. 

Walter A. Rodriguez C, Clinical Associate in 
Oral Surgery 
M.D., San Marcos University. 

Paula M. Schachtel, Research Associate in 
Community Dentistry 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1969. 

Robert W. Warson, Clinical Associate in Oral 
Surgery 

B.S., Loyola College, 1958; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1962. 

Thaddeus Weglarski, Clinical Associate in Re- 
storative Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1961. 

Lawrence J. Wisman, Clinical Associate in Re- 
storative Dentistry 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1962; D.D.S., 
1965; M.S.D., University of Washington, 1971. 

ASSISTANTS 

John W. Britt, Assistant in Restorative Dentistry 

William F. King, Jr., Assistant in Restorative 

Dentistry 
Joseph A. Rutherford, Assistant in Restorative 

Dentistry 




ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT 

Leon Seligman 

6006 Park Heights Avenue 

Baltimore, Maryland 21215 

PRESIDENT-ELECT 

Francis A. Veltre 

209 W. Maple Road 

Linthicum Heights, Maryland 21090 

1st VICE PRESIDENT 
William R. Patteson 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

2nd VICE PRESIDENT 
William Schunick 

Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

SECRETARY 
Joseph P. Cappuccio 
6810 North Charles Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21204 



TREASURER 
J. Philip Norris 
1207 Frederick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

EDITOR 

Kyrle W. Preis 

Mt. Vista & Belair Roads 

Kingsville, Maryland 21087 

HISTORIAN-ARCHIVIST 
Gardner P. H. Foley 
4407 Sedgwick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

PAST-PRESIDENT (Ex-Officio) 
Joseph H. Seipp, Jr. 
3700 N. Charles Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21218 



School of Dentistry/ 55 



UNIVERSITY ALUMNI COUNCIL 
REPRESENTATIVES 

Harry W. F. Dressel— 1973 
6340 Frederick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 
Joe N. Price— 1974 
6921 Annapolis Road 
Landover Hills, Maryland 20784 
William T. Strahan — 1975 
220 University Blvd. W. 
Silver Spring, Md. 20901 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Leon Seligman 
Baltimore, Maryland 
William Schunick 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Kyrle W. Pre is 
Kingsville, Maryland 
Francis A. Veltre 
Linthicum Heights, Maryland 
Joseph P. Cappuccio 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Gardner P. H. Foley 
Baltimore, Maryland 
William R. Patteson 
Baltimore, Maryland 
J. Philip Norris 
\ Baltimore, Maryland 
Joseph H. Seipp, Jr. 
Baltimore, Maryland 




ELECTED MEMBERS 

Conrad L. Inman — 1973 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
Charles L. Page, Jr. — 1973 
8403 Loch Raven Blvd. 
Baltimore, Maryland 21204 
Anthony Bravos — 1974 
608 Sussex Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21204 
George H. Williams, III— 1974 
12116 Jerusalem Road 
Kingsville, Maryland 21087 
Joseph L. Cannizzaro — 1975 
5810 Harford Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21214 
Michael H. Ventura — 1975 
2069 E. Belvedere Avenue 
Baltimore, Maryland 21239 



ENDOWMENT FUND 
TRUSTEES 

Trustees Ex-Officio 
Leon Seligman, President 
Francis A. Veltre, President-Elect 
Joseph P. Cappuccio, Secretary 
J. Philip Norris, Treasurer 
John J. Salley, Dean 

Elected Trustees 

Donald H. Hobrs, 1973 

1331 Reistertown Road 

Baltimore, Maryland 21208 

A. James Kershaw, 1973 

11 Bank Street, W. Warwick, R.I. 02893 

Louis C. Toomey, 1974 

800 Pershing Drive, Silver Spring, Md. 20910 

William B. Powell, 1974 

1214 N. Harford Street, Arlington, Va. 22201 

Vernon F. Ottenritter, 1975 

5800 Loch Raven Blvd., Baltimore, Md. 21212 

Ashub G. Chavoor, 1975 

916 19th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006 



56/ University of Maryland 

DEANS OF DENTAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 
BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

(Founded 1840) 

Chapin A. Harris 1840-1841 

Thomas E. Bond 1841-1842 

Washington R. Handy 1842-1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853-1865 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1865-1882 

Richard B. Winder 1882-1894 

M. Whilldin Foster 1894-1914 

William G. Foster 1914-1923 

MARYLAND DENTAL COLLEGE 

1873-1878 (Merged with Baltimore College of Dental Surgery) 
Richard B. Winder 1873-1878 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1882-1911 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1911-1923 

BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1895-1913 (Merged with University of Maryland) 

J. William Smith 1895-1901 

William A. Montell 1901-1903 

J. Edgar Orrison 1903-1904 

J. William Smith 1904-1913 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Baltimore College of Dental Surgery Joined the University of Maryland in 1923 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1923-1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924-1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1953-1963 

John J. Salley 1963- 






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"The purpose of a university is to perform at a high level 
in all of its endeavors and to elevate the individual and 
society. It should remain a place where new ideas can be 
expounded and nurtured. It should lead in the discovery of 
the truth and in the orderly discussion of controversial 
issues. Just as it teaches tolerance, it should tolerate lawful 
dissent and expect restlessness and impatience. The Uni- 
versity, however, should not be an activist organization. 
Rather its proper role is to examine the issues, thereby 
enabling individuals to arrive at conclusions and to act or 
not to act as they believe is right. A public university cannot 
be independent of government but its governing board 
should be autonomous, and it should resist with all its will 
and rising influence any effort toward political control. A 
university must be free in the proper sense of freedom." 



From "Issues and Rumblings in Higher Education' 

Convocation Address of President 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

April 19, 1967 

College Park Compus, Maryland 



Bulletin of School of 
Dentistry 1974/76 



Not available 




Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery 

DENTAL SCHOOL 



3*vhJuLS81* 




CDCippinn 



BULLETIN 

I 9 76/ 78 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



Students are considered for admission to the University of Maryland 
Dental School without regard for race, color, creed or sex. It is the 
objective of the School to enroll students with diversified 
backgrounds in order to make the educational experience more 
meaningful for each individual as well as to provide dental health 
practitioners to all segments of the community. 



The Dental School is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary 
Educational Programs of the Councfl on Dental Education of the American Dental Association. 

The University of Maryland has been elected to membership in the Association of American Univer- 
sities. This Association, founded in 1900, is an organization of those universities in the United States 
and Canada generally considered to be preeminent in the fields of graduate and professional study and 
research. 

* 
The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the I 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the right to change a(ny provision or requirement at any time within 
the student's term of residence. The University further reserves the right, at any time, to ask a student to withdraw 
when it considers such action to be in the best interests of the University. 



1976-78 Bulletin 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 
















' <•« 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Statement of Philosophy 4 

The School 5 

The Campus 7 

The Health Sciences Library 7 

Museum of the Baltimore 

College of Dental Surgery 7 

Registration and Matriculation 8 

Tuition and Fees 8 

Explanation of Fees 9 

Determination of 

In-State Status 10 

Registration Procedures 10 

Student Health Requirements 10 

Withdrawal and 

Refund of Fees 11 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 

Admissions and Application 

Procedures 13 

Academic Policies 15 

Specially Tailored 

Educational Program 16 

Equipment and Supplies 17 

Student Professional Insurance 17 

Requirements for Graduation 17 

Special Lecture Funds 17 

The Dental Curriculum 18 

Course Descriptions 20 

Anatomy 20 

Basic Dental Science 21 

Biochemistry 21 

Clinical Dentistry 22 

Clerkship Program 22 

Conjoint Sciences 22 

Dental Care for 

the Handicapped 23 

Educational and 

Instructional Resources 23 

Endodontics 23 

Fixed Restorative Dentistry 24 

Medicine 25 

Microbiology 25 

Oral Health Care Delivery 25 

DAU (Dental Auxiliary 

Utilization) 26 

TEAM (Training in 
Expanded Auxiliary 

Management) 26 

Oral Pathology 27 

Oral Surgery 27 

Orthodontics 28 

Pediatric Dentistry 28 

Periodontics 28 

Pharmacology 28 

Physiology 29 

Removable Prosthodontics 29 

Senior Dental Extern Program 29 

Accelerated Professional 
Training Program 30 



DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM 

General Information 33 

Admissions and Application 

Procedures 36 

Graduation Requirements 37 

Course Descriptions 37 

ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

Graduate Education 39 

Advanced Specialty 

Education Programs 39 

Endodontics 40 

Oral Surgery 41 

Orthodontics 41 

Pediatric Dentistry 42 

Periodontics 43 

Prosthodontics 43 

Continuing Education 45 

STUDENT LIFE 

Office of Student Affairs 46 

Office of Academic Affairs 47 

Student Honor Code 47 

Housing 47 

Student Health Service 48 

Baltimore Union 48 

Publications 48 

Organizations 48 

Awards 50 

Employment Opportunities 

in Dentistry 51 

Scholarship and 
Loan Funds 

Dental Students 51 

Dental Hygiene Students 52 

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

Board of Regents 54 

University of Maryland 

Central Administration 54 

Officers of the University 

of Maryland at Baltimore 54 

Officers for Central and 

Administrative Services, 

University of Maryland 

at Baltimore 55 

Administrative Officers of 

the Dental School 56 

The Faculty 56 

Deans of Dental Schools 

in Baltimore 66 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 68 

CAMPUS MAP AND 

DESCRIPTION 70 



4 /General Information 













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STATEMENT OF 
PHILOSOPHY 

Dentistry as a health service has dem- 
onstrated a variety of achievements since 
its birth as a profession in 1840. Not the 
least of these have been technical excellence 
in clinical procedures and an improved un- 
derstanding of human biology. In the latter 
half of the twentieth century the profession 
has responded to a call for increased social 
awareness. As a university discipline den- 
tal education must meet and surpass its 
previous accomplishments in the continu- 
ing evolution of dental science. Also, as a 



part of a modern university, the Dental 
School must keep its programs focused on 
the three basic aims of the academic com- 
munity — teaching, research and service. 
The process of education, whether it be 
in dentistry, engineering, law, medicine, 
business administration or theology, is a 
dynamic and changing force which often 
presents a paradoxical profile. While it 
must remain anchored firmly to time-tested 
principles, it must also continually extend 
itself to uncover hidden truths within these 
same principles and thereby contribute to 
man's progress toward better understand- 
ing and control of his environment. 



General Information 15 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




Horace H. Hayden 



Q 

Chapin A. Harris 



THE SCHOOL 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore, occupies an important and 
unique place in the heritage of dentistry in 
that it represents the first effort in history to 
offer institutional dental education to those 
anticipating the practice of dentistry. At the 
end of the 1974-75 academic session the 
Dental School completed its one hundred 
and thirty-fifth year of service to dental 
education and increased to more than 
10,000 the number of its graduates. 

The long and notable history of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery is replete 
with many names of great prominence in 
the affairs of dentistry, but none transcends 
those of Horace H. Hayden and Chapin A. 
Harris. Dr. Horace H. Hayden, a native of 
Windsor, Connecticut, began the practice 
of dentistry in Baltimore in 1800. From that 
time until his death in 1844 he made a zeal- 
ous attempt to lay the foundation for a sci- 
entific and serviceable dental profession. In 
1830 Dr. Chapin A. Harris, a man of un- 
usual ability, came to Baltimore from 
Greenfield, Ohio, to study under Hayden. 
Together they were to play a major role in 
establishing and promoting formal dental 
education. 

The first lectures on dentistry in the 
United States were delivered by Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden at the University of Maryland 



School of Medicine between the years 1823 
and 1825. These lectures were interrupted 
in 1825 by internal dissensions in the 
School of Medicine and, as a consequence, 
were discontinued. It was Dr. Hayden's be- 
lief that dental education merited greater 
attention than it had been given by 
medicine or could be given by the 
preceptorial plan of dental teaching then in 
vogue. Since Dr. Hayden's lectures had 
been interrupted at the University of Mary- 
land, and since there was a seemingly 
insurmountable difficulty confronting the 
creation of dental departments in medical 
schools, the establishment of an indepen- 
dent dental college was undertaken. On 
February 14, 1840 a charter for the college 
was granted by the General Assembly of 
Maryland. The first faculty meeting was 
held February 3, 1840, at which time Dr. 
Horace H. Hayden was elected President 
and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, Dean. The intro- 
ductory lecture was delivered by Dr. 
Hayden on November 3, 1840, to the first 
students matriculating in the first class. 
Thus was created as the foundation of the 
present dental profession the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, the first dental 
school in the world. 

The founding of conventional dental 
education was not the only contribution of 
Hayden and Harris. In 1839 the predeces- 
sor of the Journal of the American Dental Asso- 
ciation, the American Journal of Dental Science, 
was founded with Chapin A. Harris as 



6 /General Information 



editor. Dr. Harris continued fully responsi- 
ble for dentistry's initial venture into 
periodic scientific literature until his death 
in 1860. The files of the old American Journal 
of Dental Science document the fine 
contributions made by Dr. Harris. In 1840 
the American Society of Dental Surgeons 
was founded with Dr. Horace H. Hayden 
as its President and Dr. Chapin A. Harris as 
its Corresponding Secretary. The Society 
was the beginning of organized dentistry in 
America and the forerunner of the Ameri- 
can Dental Association, which now has 
approximately 112,000 members. The 
foregoing suggests the unusual influence of 
Baltimore dentists and the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery on the continuing 
growth and development of the dental pro- 
fession. 

The Maryland Dental College, an off- 
spring of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, was in operation from 1873 until 
1878, at which time it was consolidated 
with the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery. A department of dentistry was or- 
ganized at the University of Maryland in 
the year 1882 and a class was graduated 
each year from 1883 to 1923. The School 
was chartered as a corporation and con- 
tinued as a privately-owned and directed 
institution until 1920, when it became a 
State institution. The Dental Department of 
the Baltimore Medical College, established 
in 1895, was merged in 1913 with the Dental 
Department of the University of Maryland. 
A final melding of the dental educational 
interests in Baltimore into one institution 
was accomplished on June 15,1923 when, 
with the amalgamation of the student 
bodies of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery and the University of Maryland 
Dental School, the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery became a distinct depart- 
ment of the University under State super- 
vision and control. 

As the methods of delivery of dental 
health services have evolved to include 
greater reliance on dental auxiliaries and 
dental specialists, the Dental School has 



made continuing efforts to provide appro- 
priate educational and training oppor- 
tunities. Innovative programs in Dental 
Auxiliary Utilization (DAU) and Training in 
Expanded Auxiliary Management (TEAM) 
were initiated to provide students with ex- 
perience in the utilization and management 
of auxiliaries. A senior dental externship 
program was established to provide an op- 
portunity for selected students to work in 
private dental offices with established gen- 
eral practitioners, who serve as preceptors. 
In 1970 a baccalaureate degree program in 
dental hygiene was initiated by the Dental 
School. This program, the first and only 
one of its kind in Maryland, is designed to 
prepare individuals for careers in dental 
hygiene practice, dental hygiene education 
and other areas of interest to this important 
dental auxiliary field. 

The School now offers postdoctoral train- 
ing in the specialty areas of endodontics, 
orthodontics, oral surgery, pediatric den- 
tistry, periodontics and prosthodontics. An 
internship-residency program in oral 
surgery, established in 1964 in conjunction 
with the University of Maryland Hospital, 
has since expanded to include affiliations 
with Baltimore City Hospital, Mercy Hospi- 
tal and Provident Hospital. An internship- 
residency program in pediatric dentistry, 
initiated in 1968, now includes affiliations 
with the Community Pediatric Center of 
the School of Medicine, the University of 
Maryland Hospital, the Maryland School 
for the Blind and the Kennedy Institute for 
the Habilitation of the Handicapped Child, 
an affiliate of Johns Hopkins University. 

A continuing education program, de- 
signed to acquaint dentists and dental aux- 
iliaries with changes in knowledge, tech- 
niques and materials, has realized signifi- 
cant growth since its origin in 1961. 
Approximately fifty continuing education 
courses are presented annually. 

The preceding summary of the School's 
origin and its contributions to the art and 
science of dentistry offers ample evidence 
of the extraordinary place the School oc- 



General Information 17 



zupies in the history of the dental profes- 
sion. It also affirms the School's commit- 
ment to excellence in dental education, its 
sensitivity to the changing world around 
the university and its recognition of the 
needs of the public and the profession. 

THE CAMPUS 

The Dental School is located on the cam- 
pus of the University of Maryland at Balti- 
more in the heart of metropolitan Balti- 
more. Other major units of this campus are 
the Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, 
Pharmacy, Social Work and Community 
Planning, and the University of Maryland 
Hospital. These professional schools and 
their service programs contribute to the 
health and welfare of the citizens of Mary- 
land. The support and utilization of the 
University's services by community resi- 
dents in turn represent a vital resource for 
the University. The City of Baltimore is one 
of the important commercial, cultural, his- 
torical and scientific centers in the Eastern 
United States, and offers unlimited extra- 
curricular activities to students and visitors. 

THE HEALTH SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 

This School is fortunate to have one of 
the best equipped and organized libraries 
of any dental school in the country. The 
dental collection is part of the Health Sci- 
ences Library, which serves all professional 
schools on the Baltimore campus. More 
than 175,000 bound volumes and over 3,200 
current subscriptions to scientific periodi- 
cals in the fields of dentistry, medicine, 
nursing, pharmacy and social work are 
housed in a four-story library building at 
111 South Greene Street. A well-qualified 
staff of professionally trained and certified 
librarians is available to assist students in 
the use of the library's resources. The avail- 
ability of this facility on campus enables the 
Dental School to incorporate dental litera- 
ture into the curriculum, thereby promot- 



ing the student's use of the literature as an 
important source of further knowledge and 
development when he becomes a prac- 
titioner. 

MUSEUM OF THE 
BALTIMORE COLLEGE 
OF DENTAL SURGERY 

The Dental School Museum is housed in 
the Reading Room of the Independent 
Learning Center on the ground floor of 
Hayden-Harris Hall, with special displays 
appropriately located in other areas of the 
building. 

Because of its heritage from the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, the first institu- 
tion in the world devoted to dental educa- 
tion, and the importance of Baltimore in the 
development of professional dentistry, the 
Museum has developed a large and valu- 
able collection of objects and specimens of 
historical and professional interest. Several 
items of particular national and interna- 
tional interest, such as George 
Washington's dentures, have been loaned 
to the Smithsonian Institution in 
Washington, D. C, where they may be 
shared with a larger audience. 

Items which visitors may see at the 
Museum include many early dental in- 
struments, dental chairs and operatories, 
instrument cabinets, dental equipment, ar- 
tificial dentures representing the various 
stages through which the art of dental pros- 
thesis has progressed, replicas of ancient 
dental appliances, items relating to the de- 
velopment of the profession of dentistry 
and portraits of leaders in the development 
of professional dentistry. 

The Museum and the Independent 
Learning Center are open throughout the 
year Monday through Friday from 8:30 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. with extended hours eve- 
nings and Saturdays during the regular 
academic year. It is closed during official 
school holidays. Group tours are welcome, 
but arrangements must be made in ad- 
vance. 



$ 


$ 


400.00 


400.00 


934.00 


934.00 


10.00 


10.00 


7.00 


6.00 


3.00 


3.00 




46.56 




15.00 


20.00 


20.00 


205.00 


205.00 



8 /General Information 

REGISTRATION AND MATRICULATION 



1975-76 
TUITION AND FEES 

DENTAL PROGRAM 

Fall Winter Spring Total 

Application/Matriculation Fee $ 

Tuition — In-State 400.00 

Tuition — Out-of-State 934.00 

Instructional Resources Fee 10.00 

Student Activities Fee 7.00 

Student Health Fee 4.00 

Hospital Insurance (individual) 46.56 

Graduation Fee — 4th Year 

Supporting Facilities Fee 20.00 

Dormitory Fee 205.00 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

Application/Matriculation Fee 

Tuition — Per Credit 

In-State 47.00* 

Out-of-State 77.00* 

Continuous Registration Fee 10.00 

Student Health Fee (full-time) 5.00 

Student Health Fee (part-time) 2.00 

Hospital Insurance 

(full-time) optional 46.56 

Dormitory Fee . . , 307.50 

Graduation Fee — Masters Degree 15.00 

Graduation Fee — Doctoral Degree 60.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee (full-time) 30.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee (part-time) 6.00 

* $1.00 per credit hour to be distributed to Auxiliary Fees, 
t 1-time fee. 

POSTDOCTORAL PROGRAM 

Application/Matriculation Fee 

Tuition — In-State 660.00 660.00 

Tuition — Out-of-State 1,150.00 1,150.00 

Student Health Fee 5.00 5.00 

Instructional Resources Fee 15.00 15.00 

Hospital Insurance (individual) 46.56 46.56 

Student Activities Fee 10.00 10.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee 30.00 30.00 



47.00 


77.00 


10.00 


5.00 


2.00 


46.56 


307.50 


15.00 


60.00 


30.00 


6.00 



$ 


$ 15.00 


275.00 


550.00 


910.00 


1,820.00 


10.00 


20.00 


5.00 


10.00 


307.50 


615.00 


46.56 


93.12 


15.00 


15.00 


15.00 


30.00 


30.00 


60.00 



General Information 19 

DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM FaU_ Winter Spring Total 

Application/Matriculation Fee $ 

Tuition — In-State 275.00 

Tuition — Out-of-State 910.00 

Student Activities Fee 10.00 

Student Health Fee 5.00 

Dormitory Fee 307.50 

Hospital Insurance (individual) 46.56 

Graduation Fee — Seniors 

Instructional Resources Fee 15.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee 30.00 

EXPLANATION OF FEES 

The Application and/or Matriculation Fee partially defrays the cost of processing applications for 
admission and enrollment data in the professional schools. These are not refundable. The Application 
Fee will be applied against the Matriculation Fee for accepted students. 

The Continuous Registration Fee is applicable to students who have been advanced to candidacy and 
who have completed required credit hours, but who have not completed the thesis or dissertation. 

The Student Health Fee is charged to help defray the cost of providing a Student Health Service. This 
service includes routine examinations and emergency care. Acceptable medical insurance is required 
in addition to the Student Health Fee. 

Hospital Insurance is required of all full-time students. A brief outline of the Student Health 
Insurance Program is furnished each student. Students with equivalent insurance coverage must 
provide proof of such coverage to the Dean at the time of registration and obtain a Hospital Insurance 
Waiver. 

The Diploma Fee is charged to help defray costs involved with graduation and commencement. 

The Instructional Resources Fee is charged to provide supplies, materials, equipment and to defray 
other costs directly associated with the instructional program. 

The Student Activities Fee is used to meet the costs for various student activities, student publications 
and cultural programs. The Student Government Association, in each of the Schools that has a 
Student Activities Fee, in cooperation with the Dean's Office of the School, recommends expenditure 
of the fee collected. 

The Supporting Facilities Fee is used for expansion of various campus facilities that are not funded or 
are funded only in part from other sources. 

Fixed Charges Fee is a charge to meet a part of the costs for the educational program and supporting 
services. 

• A service charge is assessed for dishonored checks and is payable for each check which is returned 
unpaid by the drawee bank on initial presentation because of insufficient funds, payment stopped, 
postdating, drawn against uncollected items, etc. 

For checks up to $50.00 $ 5.00 

For checks from $50.01 to $100.00 $10.00 

For checks over $100.00 $20.00 

• The Late Registration Fee is charged to defray the cost of the special handling involved for those 
who do not complete their registration on the prescribed days. 

• No degree will be conferred, nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript of record issued to a student 
who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 

• The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other charges as may be 
necessary. 



WIGeneral Information 



DETERMINATION OF 
IN-STATE STATUS 

The Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland approved new regulations for 
the determination of in-state status for ad- 
mission, tuition and charge-differential 
purposes at its meeting on September 21, 
1973. The new regulations became effective 
on January 1, 1974. 

Persons interested in obtaining a copy of 
the regulations should write: Committee on 
Admissions, University of Maryland Den- 
tal School, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

Each student is required to fill in all reg- 
istration materials and deposit them with 
the Office of the Registrar at the beginning 
of each term. No registration is complete or 
official until these materials are deposited 
and all financial obligations are satisfied. 
Students who do not complete their regis- 
tration, including the payment of their bill 
on the registration days, will be subject to a 
late registration fee. 

All tuition and fees are due and payable 
on the dates specified for registration. Stu- 
dents must pay a graduation fee at the be- 
ginning of the term immediately prior to 
their anticipated graduation. 

Any enrolled student may request at reg- 
istration the postponement of payment of 
one-half his fixed charges for thirty (30) 
days; all other fees are due and payable. For 
this service a charge of $2.00 will be made. 

If a satisfactory settlement or agreement 
for settlement is not made with the Busi- 
ness Office within ten days after a payment 
is due, the student automatically is de- 
barred from attendance of classes and will 
forfeit the other privileges at the Dental 
School. 

STUDENT HEALTH 
REQUIREMENTS 

All students are required to have Blue 
Cross hospitalization insurance or its 



equivalent. A special Blue Cross/Blue 
Shield student policy is available to all stu- 
dents enrolling in the School. Detailed in- 
formation regarding the provisions of the 
student policy may be obtained from the 
Student Health Office. At the time of 
registration each student must either pur- 
chase the student Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
coverage or produce certified proof of 
equivalent coverage. 

Upon arrival on campus, students are re- 
quired to have a tuberculin skin test and 
chest x-ray as part of the registration pro- 
cess. Students with a negative tuberculin 
skin test will be retested each year upon 
returning to school. Students who convert 
from negative to positive skin tests are 
examined; an x-ray of the chest will be ob- 
tained at intervals and suppressive medica- 
tion may be recommended. 

Smallpox vaccination is required of all 
Health Science students. Any student hav- 
ing a contraindication to vaccination should 
bring a physician's statement to this effect 
to the Student Health Office at the time of 
registration. 

In addition to a tuberculin skin test and 
chest x-ray, each student is required to un- 
dergo a physical examination, including a 
urinalysis, at the Health Service Office. 

Each new student is also required to un- 
dergo an oral diagnosis examination by the 
School. The final acceptance of any student 
is contingent upon the correction of any 
defects noted during this examination 
within the first academic year. 

Prospective students are advised to have 
any known physical defects corrected be- 
fore entering the School in order to prevent 
loss of time which later correction might 
involve. 

The School does not accept responsibility 
for an illness or accident occurring away 
from the community, or for expenses in- 
curred for hospitalization or medical ser- 
vices not authorized by the Student Health 
Service. 



General Information 111 



WITHDRAWAL AND 
REFUND OF FEES 

Students desiring to leave the School at 
any time during the academic year are re- 
quired to file with the Dean a letter of resig- 
nation. In addition, an Application For 
Withdrawal Form bearing the proper signa- 
tures must be filed with the Office of the 
Registrar. The student must satisfy the au- 
thorities that he has no outstanding obliga- 
tions to the School and return his student 
identification card. 

If the above procedures are not com- 
pleted, the student will not be entitled to 
honorable dismissal and will forfeit the 
right to any refunds to which he would 



otherwise be entitled. The date used in 
computing refunds is the date the applica- 
tion for withdrawal is signed by the Dean. 

REFUNDS 

Students officially withdrawing from the 
School will be credited for all academic fees 
charged to them less the Matriculation Fee, 
in accordance with the following schedule 
from the date instruction begins: 

Period from Date 

Instruction Begins Refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks . .60% 
Between three and four weeks . .40% 
Between four and five weeks . . .20% 
Over five weeks 




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The Dental Program /13 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



ADMISSIONS AND 

APPLICATION 

PROCEDURES 

GENERAL 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland 

| subscribes to a policy of equal educational 
opportunity for men and women of all 
races, creeds and ethnic origins. The Dental 
School, in seeking to broaden the racial and 

' ethnic balance of its enrollment, encour- 

; ages minority student applications. 

Beginning students and advanced stand- 
ing students are admitted only at the be- 
ginning of the fall semester in September. 
Applications may be filed after June 1 of the 

; year prior to the desired date of admission. 
Deadlines for application are December 1 
for out-of-state residents and January 1 for 

I Maryland residents. The early filing of 
applications is strongly recommended. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants for admission to the dental 
program must have successfully completed 
at least three academic years of work in an 
accredited college of arts and sciences. The 
college course must include at least a year's 
credit in English (6), in biology (8), in 
physics (8), in general or inorganic chemis- 
try (8), and in organic chemistry (8). All 
required science courses shall include both 
classroom and laboratory instruction. Al- 
though a minimum of 90 semester hours of 

I I credit (exclusive of physical education and 



military science) is required, additional 
courses in the humanities and the natural 
and social sciences are desirable. No more 
than 60 hours of the minimum required 
credits will be accepted from junior college 
and then only if these credits are validated 
by an accredited college of arts and sci- 
ences. By the ruling of the Faculty Council, 
all admission requirements must be com- 
pleted by June 30 prior to the desired date of 
admission. 

All applicants must also provide favor- 
able recommendations from their respec- 
tive predental committees or, if no such 
committee is available, from one instructor 
in each of the departments of biology and 
chemistry. In all other respects, applicants 
must give every promise of becoming suc- 
cessful students and dentists of high stand- 
ing. Applicants will not be admitted with 
unabsolved conditions or unabsolved fail- 
ures. 




14 IThe Dental Program 



APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

Applicants seeking admission to the den- 
tal program should write to the Committee 
on Admissions, Baltimore College of Den- 
tal Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. The 
Committee will then send the applicant an 
application form for A. A.D.S.A.S. (Ameri- 
can Association of Dental Schools Applica- 
tion Service), which the applicant should 
complete and mail as directed. 
A. A.D.S.A.S. will analyze the transcripts, 
calculate grade point averages of each 
applicant and furnish the Committee on 
Admissions with the pertinent informa- 
tion. 

// the minimum requirements for admission 
are fulfilled, the applicant will receive the 
Dental School's application form, which 
should be completed and mailed with the 
application fee ($15.00) to the Committee 
on Admissions. Receipt of the application 
will be acknowledged by the Committee on 
Admissions. If this acknowledgement is 
not received within ten days, the applicant 
should contact the Committee. Applicants 
may be interviewed at the discretion of the 
Committee on Admissions. A personal in- 
terview does not guarantee admission nor 
is it required for each applicant. 

All applicants will be required to take the 
Dental Admissions Test. A pamphlet de- 
scribing the test and an application to take 
the test will be included with the 
A. A.D.S.A.S. material (see above). This 
test will be given at various testing centers 
throughout the United States, its posses- 
sions and Canada. Applicants will be 
notified by the Council on Dental Educa- 
tion of the American Dental Association of 
the dates of the tests and the locations of the 
testing centers. 

The Committee on Admissions, com- 
posed of members of the Dental School fac- 
ulty and students, selects the best possible 
applicants for admission to the Dental 
School on the basis of all available informa- 
tion. The decision is based primarily on the 



applicant's undergraduate and graduate 
academic performance, Dental Admissions 
Test scores and personal interview, if one is 
required. If an applicant accepts an offer of 
enrollment from the Dental School, a de- 
posit of $200.00 must accompany the 
applicant's acceptance. This deposit is in- 
tended to insure registration in the class 
and is not refundable. Applicants wishing 
advice on any problems relating to pre- 
dental training, application or the decision 
of the Committee on Admissions should 
communicate with the Director of Admis- 
sions. 

ADMISSION WITH 
ADVANCED STANDING 

All applicants who apply for admission 
with advanced standing must be in good 
standing in scholarship and character to be 
considered for admission. 

An applicant for transfer from another 
dental school must: 

1) meet fully the requirements for ad- 
mission listed above 

2) be eligible for advancement to the next 
higher class in the school from which 
the applicant seeks to transfer 

3) have an overall average of C (2.0 on a 
4.0 scale) in all previous work exclud- 
ing Basic Dental Science or its equiva- 
lent, in which the applicant must have 
a grade of C or higher 

4) present a letter of honorable dismissal 
and recommendation from the dean 
of the school from which the applicant 
is transferring 

All applicants who meet these require- 
ments will be sent the Dental School's 
application form and will be scheduled for 
an interview. The record of each applicant 
applying for admission by transfer will be 
referred to the appropriate Advancement 
Committee for review and recommenda- 
tion concerning acceptance. The admission 
of a student by transfer is in every case 
contingent upon the availability of space in 
the class to which the student is seeking 
admission. Credit hours as listed in the 



The Dental Program 115 



prior academic record of the transferring 
student will be prorated to conform with 
the cumulative credit hours of students in 
that class, in order to establish a com- 
parable cumulative grade point average 
and class rank for purposes of University 
and Dental School honors, letters of rec- 
ommendation, etc. 

OPTIONAL COMBINED ARTS AND 
SCIENCES-DENTAL PROGRAM 

The University of Maryland at College 
Park and University of Maryland Baltimore 
County offer a combined arts and 
sciences-dental curriculum leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor 
of Dental Surgery. The preprofessional part 
of this curriculum may be taken in res- 
idence in the College of Arts and Sciences 
on either campus, and the professional part 
in the Dental School in Baltimore. Students 
who select the combined program and who 
have completed the arts and sciences phase 
of it may, upon the recommendation of the 
Dean of the Dental School, be granted the 
degree of Bachelor of Science by the College 
of Arts and Sciences at the first summer 
commencement following the completion 
of the student's first year in the Dental 
School. A student may enter the arts and 
sciences-dental program at College Park or 
UMBC with advanced standing from an 
accredited college or university; however, 
the last year of the preprofessional training 
must be completed at College Park or 
UMBC and the professional training must 
be completed at the Dental School of the 
University of Maryland. 

ACADEMIC POLICIES 

In the evaluation of student perfor- 
mance, the following letter grades are used: 
A — excellent 
B — superior 
C — average 
D — below average 
F — failure 
I — incomplete 
E — unsatisfactory 




A failure must be remediated by repeat- 
ing the entire course, in which case the 
original F grade remains on the student's 
permanent record, but only the remediated 
grade is used to compute the grade point 
average. 

A student whose performance at the end 
of a course is not satisfactory in one or more 
segments or in some clinical procedures 
may receive the E grade. This grade implies 
that the student can achieve a satisfactory 
level of proficiency within a short time, 
without having to repeat the entire course. 
The E grade is not reflected on the student's 
permanent record. Following successful 
remediation the student may receive a final 
course grade no higher than a C. Failure to 
remediate will result in a permanent grade 
of F. 

A student whose work in completed as- 
signments is of acceptable quality but who, 
because of circumstances beyond his con- 
trol (such as illness or disability), has been 
unable to complete course requirements 
will receive a grade of Incomplete. When all 
requirements have been satisfied, the stu- 
dent will receive the final grade earned in 
the course. Except under extraordinary 
circumstances, an Incomplete may not be 
carried into the next academic year. 

In the clinical sciences, performance at 
the D level is unacceptable; thus the D 



16IThe Dental Program 



grade is not used by the clinical depart- 
ments or Basic Dental Science. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the 
basis of credits assigned to each course and 
the following numerical values for grades: 
A — 4, B — 3, C — 2, D — 1, F — 0. The 
grade point average is the sum of the prod- 
ucts of course credits and grade values, di- 
vided by the total number of course credits 
in that year of the curriculum. 

Students must achieve a 2.0 grade point 
average in order to advance uncondition- 
ally to the next year. Probationary ad- 
vancement may be permitted for students 
in the following categories: 

1) First year students who obtain a grade 
point average of 1.70-1.99 

2) Second year students who obtain a 
grade point average for second year 
courses of 1.70-1.99 

3) Third year students who obtain a 
grade point average for third year 
courses of 1.85-1.99 

A student placed on probationary status for 
one year must achieve a minimum 2.0 aver- 
age, since probationary status for two suc- 
cessive years is not permitted. 

A student may remediate one or more 
course failures during the summer session, 
as decided by the Advancement Committee 
in consultation with the department(s) in- 
volved. Depending on the type of remedia- 
tion, students may be required to register 
and pay an appropriate fee for the summer 
session. 

The performance of each student is re- 
viewed at the end of each quarter and at the 
end of the academic year by an Advance- 
ment Committee. At the end of the first and 
second quarters, the Committee deter- 
mines, on the basis of progress and/or final 
grades, whether the student is progressing 
satisfactorily; if he is not, remediation, as- 
signment to a special program (first or sec- 
ond year students only) or dismissal may be 
recommended to the Faculty Council. 

At the end of the academic year, all 
appropriate Advancement Committees 
recommend unconditional advancement, 



probationary advancement, repeat of the 
year or academic dismissal to the Faculty 
Council, which must approve all Ad- 
vancement Committee decisions. 



EARLY GRADUATION 

The University of Maryland Dental 
School's Early Graduation Program is an 
administrative program to enable talented, 
conscientious students enrolled in the regu- 
lar program to be recommended by the fac- 
ulty for graduation in January of the fourth 
year. 

This program is not a special educational 
program. Students who qualify must have 
had educational experiences comparable to 
those of students who will graduate in June 
and must have achieved at least the same 
degree of clinical proficiency. 



SPECIALLY TAILORED 
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

The Specially Tailored Educational Pro- 
gram (STEP) functions within the 
framework of the regular curriculum but 
allows students to spend more than two 
years to complete courses in the first two 
years of the curriculum. The program was 
developed for students who, because of 
academic difficulty, illness or other circum- 
stances, need special assistance and/or ad- 
ditional time to fulfill the academic re- 
quirements. 

The First and Second Year Advancement 
Committees may offer a student the option 
of STEP or assign to STEP any student 
whose progress is unsatisfactory, if it is 
generally agreed that a reduced course load 
and/or special tutorial assistance may im- 
prove the student's chance of successfully 
completing course requirements. 

Students assigned to STEP are placed 
under the supervision of the Special 
Academic Programs Committee, which 
plans for each student a program suited to 
his particular needs and carefully monitors 



The Dental Program 117 



his progress. A tutorial faculty, consisting 
of a faculty member from the basic sciences 
and pre-clinical sciences, as well as a study 
skills instructor, is available to assist any 
student assigned to STEP. 

Students who have completed all first 
year courses may be advanced into the reg- 
ular program if they have demonstrated 
satisfactory progress by the end of the first 
year; otherwise they remain in STEP until 
they have completed all first and second 
year courses. Once the student is advanced 
into the regular program his academic 
progress is evaluated by the appropriate 
Advancement Committee. 



EQUIPMENT AND 
SUPPLIES 

A complete list of essential instruments 
and materials for all courses is supplied to 
students. Arrangements are made in ad- 
vance for instruments and materials to be 
delivered to students at the beginning of 
the term. Each student should purchase the 
prescribed items promptly. 



;STUDENT PROFESSIONAL 
INSURANCE 

It is the policy of the Dental School that 
all students involved in clinic patient care 
be required to show evidence of malprac- 
tice insurance coverage as a condition for 
enrollment in any academic quarter. This 
policy applies to all second, third and 
fourth year undergraduate dental students 
and to third and fourth year dental hygiene 
students. Undergraduate students, both 
dental and dental hygiene, may obtain 
malpractice coverage through a group pro- 
gram of the American Student Dental 
Association (The Professional Protector® 
Plan) for a reasonable premium. This Plan 
i:an also provide equipment coverage for an 
[additional nominal premium. Information 



regarding professional coverage for under- 
graduate students is available through the 
Dental School's Office of Student Affairs. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR 
GRADUATION 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is 
conferred upon a candidate who has met 
the conditions specified below. 

1) A candidate must have satisfied all re- 
quirements of the various depart- 
ments. 

2) A candidate must have achieved a 
minimum 2.0 average in fourth year 
courses. 

3) The candidate must have attained the 
age of 21 years. 

4) The candidate must have paid all in- 
debtedness to the University prior to 
the beginning of final examinations. 



SPECIAL LECTURE FUNDS 

The Grayson W. Gaver Memorial Lecture. 
Through the generosity of both his family 
and the School alumni, an endowed lec- 
tureship has been established in memory of 
the late Dr. Grayson W. Gaver. Dr. Gaver 
was an outstanding leader in the field of 
prosthodontics and a distinguished 
member of the faculty for many years. It is 
fitting that his name be perpetuated 
through an annual lecture devoted to the 
field of prosthodontics. 

The William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell Lec- 
ture. In 1965, two faithful alumni, Drs. Wil- 
liam B. and Elizabeth S. Powell, presented 
the School with a generous contribution for 
the purpose of instituting special lectures 
for the benefit of the student body and fac- 
ulty. The first lecture in the series was pre- 
sented in April, 1966. These lectures pro- 
vide a means of broadening the total 
academic program. 



IS IThe Dental Program 



THE DENTAL CURRICULUM 
YEAR I 



SUBJECT 



CLOCK HOURS 



CREDITS 



Quarter 
1 2 3 Total 



Anatomy 176 110 286 13 

DANA 511 

Basic Dental Science 95 118 150 363 14 

DENT 511 

Biochemistry 88 88 5 

DBIC 511 

Conjoint Sciences 44 44 3 

DCJS 513 

Microbiology 88 88 5 

DMIC512 

Oral Health Care Delivery 33 33 66 4 



OHCD 512 

Physiology 

DPHS 513 





88 


88 


5 




359 


349 315 


1023 


49 




YEAR II 








SUBJECT 




CLOCK HOURS 




CREDITS 




2 


Quarter 

2 3 


Total 




Basic Dental Science 


136 


234 229 


599 


25 


DENT 521 






Biomedicine 

DPAT 521 


66 


66 66 


198 


12 


Conjoint Sciences 


66 


66 66 


198 


12 


DCJS 521 






Oral Health Care Delivery 

OHCD 521 


22 


22 22 


66 


4 


Pharmacology 

DPHR 521 


88 





88 


5 




378 


388 383 


1149 


58 



YEAR III 



The Dental Program 119 



SUBJECT 



CLOCK HOURS 



CREDITS 



Quarter 
1 2 3 



Total 



Conjoint Sciences 
DCJS 531 



Oral Diagnosis/Radiology 
DPAT 531 

Oral Health Care Delivery 
OHCD 531 
or 

OHCD 537 

Special Studies (elective) 



22 22 22 66 



22 22 11 55 



22 33 55 



Oral Surgery 
DSUR531 

Orthodontics 
ORTH 531 



Pediatric Dentistry 
PEDS 531 



22 22 



11 11 



Periodontics 

PERI 531 

Fixed Restorative Dentistry 
FIXD 531 

Removable Prosthodontics 
REMV 531 

Endodontics 

ENDO 531 



22 11 



15 



44 



22 



11 11 11 33 



33 



11 29 



12 10 11 33 



14 



(6) 



11 



13 



Clinic 


357 


297 


330 


984 






501 


438 


429 


1368 


68 




YEAR IV 










SUBJECT 




CLOCK HOURS 




CREDITS 




i 


Quarter 
2 3 


Total 




Conjoint Sciences 


110 


50 





160 


6 


DCJS 541 






Clinic 


330 


330 


240 


900 


55 


i 


440 


380 


240 


1060 


61 



IQIThe Dental Program 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 




Dental Infirmary about 1900 



ANATOMY 

Chairman: Dr. D. Vincent Provenza 
Professors: Barry, Piavis, Provenza 
Associate Professors: Gartner, Hiatt 
Assistant Professors: Hobart, Meszler, Seibel 
Instructor: Khan 
Lecturer: Lindenberg 



The basic course in Human Anatomy consists 
of a thorough study of the cells, tissues, organs 
and organ systems of the body from the gross, 
microscopic and developmental aspects. Princi- 
ples of body structure and function are studied 
with particular emphasis on those concerned 
with the head, facial region, oral cavity and 
associated organs. Neuroanatomy deals with 
the gross and microscopic structure of the cen- 
tral nervous system and peripheral nerves with 
special attention to functional phases. Correla- 
tion is made with other courses in the basic sci- 
ences and clinical disciplines of the dental cur- 
riculum. 

DANA 511. HUMAN ANATOMY (13) 



For Postdoctoral Students: 

DANA 514. THE ANATOMY OF THE HEAD AND 
NECK (3) 

For Graduate Students: 

DANA 610. HUMAN EMBRYOLOGY (4) 

HUMAN GROSS ANATOMY (8) 
HUMAN NEUROANATOMY (4) 
ADVANCED HEAD AND NECK 
ANATOMY (3) 

EMBRYOLOGICAL BASIS OF 
ANATOMY (4) 

EXPERIMENTAL EMBRYOLOGY (4) 
RADIATION BIOLOGY (4) 
SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN THE 
ANATOMIES (1-3) 
SEMINAR (1) 

PHYSICAL METHODS IN THE 
ANATOMIES (4) 
HUMAN HISTOLOGY (6) 
MAMMALIAN ORAL HISTOLOGY 
AND EMBRYOLOGY (2) 
CRANIO-FACIAL GROWTH AND 
DEVELOPMENT I AND II (2, 2) 
THE ANATOMY OF THE 
TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT (1) 
MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH 
(Credit by arrangement) 
DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Credit 
by arrangement) 



DANA 611. 


DANA 


612. 


DANA 


614. 


DANA 615. 


DANA 616. 


DANA 617. 


DANA 618. 


DANA 619. 


DANA 620. 


DANA 


621. 


DANA 


622. 


DANA 


631, 




632. 


DANA 


633. 


DANA 


799. 


DANA 


899. 



The Dental Program 121 



BASIC DENTAL SCIENCE 

Director: Dr. Russell Gigliotti 

Professors: Gigliotti, Hamilton, Hasler, Jerbi, 
Ramsey 

Clinical Professor: Halpert 

Associate Professors: Buchness, DeVore, Diaz, 
Fetchero, Leupold, McLean-Lu, Park, Ratliff, 
Rodgers, Shelton, Tilghman, E. Vanden 
Bosche, Wagner 

Associate Clinical Professors: Graham, Schunick 

Assistant Professors: Anton, Bergman, Bieder- 
man, Carr, DeSai, Dopson, Hayduk, 
Holston, Livaditis, Mastrola, Morganstein, 
Overholser, Quarantillo, Stein, Thompson, 
Vandermer, Wagley 

Assistant Clinical Professor: Andrews 

Instructors: Baldwin, Bradbury, DeRenzis, Elias, 
Sanidad, Wood 

Associate Staff: King, Rutherford, Williams 

During the first and second years of the cur- 
riculum, Basic Dental Science is the unit directly 
responsible for the teaching of the fundamental 
principles, techniques and manual skills related 
to the practice of dentistry. The subjects within 
the unit are dental morphology and occlusion, 
preventive dentistry, periodontics, dental mate- 
rials, instruments and equipment, operative 
dentistry, fixed partial prosthodontics, remov- 
able complete and partial prosthodontics, endo- 
dontics, pedodontics, orthodontics, oral surgery 
and local anesthesia. The teaching and learning 
tools include the use of lecture, laboratory pro- 
jects, self-instructional media, assigned read- 
ing, clinical assignments, and both written and 
practical examinations. The course planning and 
presentation are the result of the cooperative 
effort of members of every clinical department in 
the Dental School. 



DENT 511. 
i DENT 521. 



BASIC DENTAL SCIENCE I (14) 
BASIC DENTAL SCIENCE II (25) 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

Chairman: Dr. John P. Lambooy 
Professors: Lambooy, Kim (visiting) 
Associate Professor: Leonard 
Assistant Professors: Bashirelahi, Benveniste, 
Courtade, Morris 

Biochemistry is a study of life's processes in 
terms of molecular structure of food substances 
and body constituents. The department has two 



teaching goals; one is to present a course in 
comprehensive biochemistry to the first year 
dental students seeking a professional degree in 
dentistry, and the other is a program of 
specialized training for graduate students seek- 
ing an advanced graduate degree (M.S., Ph.D.) 
in preparation for a career in teaching and re- 
search. 

The course provided for the students studying 
for the Doctor of Dental Surgery degree covers 
the major traditional subjects of biochemistry. 
Dental students who have previously taken a 
course in biochemistry may take a placing-out 
examination which, if passed satisfactorily, 
permits them to be excused from taking the 
course offered by the department. The depart- 
ment also participates in the Conjoint Sciences 
program of the School. 

DBIC 511. PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY (5) 

For Postdoctoral Students: 

DBIC 512. DENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY (2) 

For Graduate Students: 

DBIC 609. SEMINAR (1) 

DBIC 611. ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY (4) 

DBIC 612. BIOCHEMICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY (3) 

DBIC 613. BIOCHEMISTRY OF LIPIDS (2) 

DBIC 614. BIOCHEMISTRY OF VITAMINS (2) 

DBIC 615. NUTRITION AND ENERGY 

METABOLISM (2) 
DBIC 616. BIOCHEMISTRY OF 

CARBOHYDRATES (2) 
DBIC 708. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY 

(1-3) 
DBIC 709. NON-THESIS RESEARCH IN 

BIOCHEMISTRY (1-3) 
DBIC 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's; credit by 

arrangement) 
DBIC 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral; 

credit by arrangement) 




Biochemistry Laboratory early 1900's 



22IThe Dental Program 



CLINICAL DENTISTRY 

Staff: All clinical departments 

The clinical program is designed to provide 
the student with a broad background of clinical 
experience based on the philosophy of preven- 
tion and comprehensive care. Although the 
need for the treatment of existing disease is of 
paramount importance, the clinical program 
stresses those aspects of complete dental care 
which are founded on preventing the occur- 
rence or recurrence of disease. Each third and 
fourth year student is assigned his own "dental 
office" where he treats patients in a manner 
similar to the general practitioner in the com- 
munity. Clinical areas for undergraduate in- 
struction are designated as general practice 
clinics and teaching is accomplished using teams 
of specialists working together to provide in- 
depth interdepartmental instruction for the stu- 
dent and the highest level of dental care for the 
patient. 

CLERKSHIP PROGRAM 

The Clerkship Program allows selected Year 
IV students to pursue further studies in de- 
partmental activities specially designed to meet 
their needs and interests. Students devote a por- 
tion of their clinic time to this specialized pro- 
gram; the remaining clinic time is spent in the 
comprehensive treatment of patients in the reg- 
ular program. Clerkships are available in both 
basic science and clinical disciplines. 

DCJS 547. CLERKSHIP (elective) 

CONJOINT SCIENCES 

Director of Conjoint Sciences and Interdisciplinary 
Studies: Dr. Rodger F. Sisca 

Director, Conjoint Sciences I: Dr. Birgit E. Nardell 

Director, Conjoint Sciences II: Dr. Robert K. 
Nauman 

Director, Conjoint Sciences III: Dr. C. Daniel 
Overholser 

Director, Conjoint Sciences IV: Dr. Todd Becker- 
man 

Staff: All Departments 

The program in Conjoint Sciences is struc- 
tured to bring together all biologic and clinical 
sciences in an effort to impress upon the student 
the importance of sound knowledge in all 
phases of the art and science of dentistry. Prob- 




lems of clinical significance form the basis of 
subject material for the program. Every depart- 
ment, where appropriate, contributes its exper- 
tise to the understanding and solution of the 
problem. Each year of the Conjoint Sciences fo- 
cuses on broad areas of instruction, with the first 
and second years more heavily oriented toward 
the basic sciences and the third and fourth years 
more directly related to general and special clini- 
cal problems. 

In Year I, important features of human growth 
and development are emphasized, especially 
the clinical implications of normal and abnormal 
oro-facial development. The Year II program 
traces the development of caries and periodontal 
disease, concentrating on diagnosis, treatment 
and prevention. In Year III, the management of 
oral conditions associated with a broad spec- 
trum of patient types is considered, with special 
emphasis on drugs and their clinical application. 
The curriculum in Conjoint Sciences IV is fo- 
cused primarily on practice administration and 
recent developments in the basic and clinical 
sciences. 

A special unit on cardiopulmonary resuscita- 
tion is incorporated into this program, as well as 
comprehensive instruction in the control of 
apprehension and pain. In addition, the treat- 
ment of special patients is synthesized into all 
four years of the Conjoint Sciences. 

DCJS 513. CONJOINT SCIENCES I (3) 

DCJS 521. CONJOINT SCIENCES II (12) 

DCJS 531. CONJOINT SCIENCES III (4) 

DCJS 541. CONJOINT SCIENCES IV (6) 



The Dental Program 123 



DENTAL CARE FOR 
THE HANDICAPPED 

Director, Special Patient Program: Dr. Thomas 

Daley 
Director, Special Patient Clinic: Dr. Arthur L. 

Hayden 

This program is provided to teach dental stu- 
dents the fundamentals of providing care for 
handicapped children and adults. The didactic 
portion includes information on the nature of 
handicapping conditions and their effects on the 
patient, and on the clinical management of pa- 
tients with handicapping disorders. The didactic 
phase utilizes independent learning resources, 
augmented with scheduled faculty review. Dur- 
ing the third and fourth years, students provide 
care for handicapped patients in the Special Pa- 
tient Clinic, a facility specifically designed and 
operated for this purpose. Students also obtain 
limited experience in hospital dentistry. 

The program emphasizes the special needs of 
the handicapped that must be considered in 
order for diagnostic, preventive and corrective 
dental services to be provided. 



formats. The Division's staff is readily available 
for assistance in the design and development of 
independent learning materials for the dental 
curriculum, or for consultation regarding media 
applications in a variety of educational settings. 
The ILC is available for utilization from morn- 
ing through early evening hours on weekdays 
and Saturday, and provides a spacious and com- 
fortable atmosphere for independent study. 




EDUCATIONAL AND 
INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES 

Director: Dr. James F. Craig 
Associate Professor: Moreland 
Assistant Professor: Craig 
Instructors: Britt, Perez 
Associate Staff: Kichi 

The Division of Educational and Instructional 
Resources has as its primary objective the de- 
velopment of comprehensive self-instructional 
materials that will enable students to progress 
through the dental curriculum at a rate com- 
mensurate with their own ability. 

Additionally, the Division endeavors to com- 
municate the latest innovations and practices to 
the dental practitioner by providing him with 
continuing education materials in an indi- 
vidualized format. 

The Division is composed of an Independent 
Learning Center which houses 100 study carrels 
specifically for the use of self-instructional 
media, and a closed-circuit color television facil- 
ity and graphic and photographic support area 
for the development of media in a variety of 



ENDODONTICS 

Chairman (Acting): Dr. Stanley S. Andrews 
Associate Clinical Professors: August, Schunick 
Assistant Professors: Anton, Grotstein 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Andrews, Burke, 

Goode, Goodfriend, Goren, Jurist, Klein, 

Mattocks, Spott 
Clinical Associate: Burt 

The students' introduction to endodontics be- 
gins in the second year as part of Basic Dental 
Science. It consists of a series of lectures and 
laboratories which stress the fundamentals of 
root canal therapy. Upon successful completion 
of this course the student is ready to perform the 
same procedures on clinical patients who war- 
rant this treatment. 

In the third year another series of lectures 
emphasizing diagnosis and the management of 
more difficult situations is presented. Following 
these lectures the student should be able to treat 
a greater variety of problems without seeking 
assistance. 

The fourth year experience in endodontics is 
primarily clinical. However, endodontic surgery 
and special problems in endodontics are dis- 



24IThe Dental Program 



cussed in a number of lectures as part of Con- 
joint Sciences IV. 

ENDO 531. ENDODONTIC DIAGNOSIS AND 

TREATMENT (4) 
ENDO 541. ENDODONTICS (4) 



FIXED RESTORATIVE 
DENTISTRY 

Chairman (Acting): Dr. Alvan M. Holston 

Professor: J. Greeley 

Associate Professors: Buchness, Diaz, Dosh, 
Haroth, McLean-Lu, Sisca, Steele, E. Van- 
den Bosche 

Associate Clinical Professor: M. Graham 

Assistant Professors: Abraham, Carr, Dopson, 
Holston, Livaditis, Mastrola 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Bethea, Finagin, G. 
Williams III 

Instructors: Bradbury, Gingell, Katz, Maddox, 
Sanidad 

Clinical Instructors: Bennett, Goepfrich, Iddings, 
Miller, R. Vanden Bosche 

Associate Staff: Britt, Suls 

The scope of instruction in fixed restorative 
dentistry involves the art and science of replac- 
ing missing teeth and lost or diseased tooth 
structure with fixed (non-removable) restora- 
tions — included are the disciplines of operative 
dentistry and fixed partial prosthodontics. The 



undergraduate teaching program is integrated 
throughout the four year curriculum. 

The Fixed Restorative Department assumes 
the responsibility for major segments of first and 
second year Basic Dental Science (DENT 511 and 
521) involving an introduction to fundamental 
principles and the development of the manual 
skills necessary for clinical treatment of patients. 
The first year program includes methods and 
materials used to restore individual teeth and an 
understanding of the destructive process of den- 
tal caries and the preventive aspects of restora- 
tive treatment. The second year students are 
introduced to concepts and skills used in re- 
placement of missing teeth with fixed partial 
prostheses. Instructional methodology includes 
lectures, television demonstrations, slide tape- 
instructional manual programs and laboratory 
exercises on simulated human dentition. During 
the first two years limited clinical patient treat- 
ment with close staff supervision augments and 
reinforces the foundation provided. 

During the third and fourth years, didactic 
instruction and extensive clinical treatment with 
staff guidance facilitate the application and in- 
tegration of fundamentals of operative dentistry 
and fixed partial prosthodontics. 

The Department also participates in the Con- 
joint Sciences program. 

FIXD 531. FIXED RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY (13) 
FIXD 541. FIXED RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY (15) 




Dental Clinic about 1920 



The Dental Program 125 



MEDICINE 

Chairman: Dr. Theodore E. Woodward 
Professors: Blanchard, Dennis, Helrich, Wood- 
ward 

The introduction to medicine and the princi- 
ples of medicine, physical diagnosis and hospi- 
tal protocol are taught in interdisciplinary pro- 
grams in Conjoint Sciences and Principles of 
Biomedicine. Ward rounds are conducted for 
small groups of students in the fourth year. 



MICROBIOLOGY 



Shay 



Chairman: Dr. Donald E. 
Professor: Shay 
i Associate Professors: Chang, Krywolap, Sydiskis 
Assistant Professors: Delisle, Falkler, Joseph, 

Nauman 
Special Lecturers: Jansen, Libonati, Snyder 

The Department of Microbiology offers un- 
; dergraduate and graduate programs. The un- 
[ dergraduate program is organized in such a way 
I as to supply the student with the fundamental 
I principles of microbiology in order that he may 
[understand the chemical and biological 
mechanisms of the production of disease by bac- 
teria and other parasites, and the means by 
' which the host protects itself against bacteria 
and related organisms. The graduate programs 
, leading toward the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy are designed to train 
students for positions in research and teaching. 

' DMIC 512. MICROBIOLOGY (5) 

For Advanced Undergraduates: 

DMIC 401. PATHOGENIC MICROBIOLOGY (4) 

DMIC 451. SEROLOGY IMMUNOLOGY (3) 

DMIC 452. VIROLOGY (3) 
, DMIC 453. MYCOLOGY (3) 
( DMIC 454. PARASITOLOGY (3) 

For Graduate Students: 

DMIC 600, 601. CHEMOTHERAPY (1,1) 

DMIC 609. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN 

MICROBIOLOGY (1-3) 

PUBLIC HEALTH (2) 

BACTERIAL FERMENTATIONS (2) 

ADVANCED DENTAL 

MICROBIOLOGY AND 

IMMUNOLOGY (4) 

MICROBIOLOGY OF THE 

PERIODONTIUM (2) 

EXPERIMENTAL VIROLOGY (4) 

VIRAL ONCOLOGY (3) 



DMIC 611 
DMIC 612 
DMIC 621 



DMIC 624. 

DMIC 630. 
DMIC 634. 



DMIC 635. BACTERIAL GENETICS (4) 
DMIC 650. ADVANCED GENERAL 

MICROBIOLOGY (4) 
DMIC 651. ADVANCED GENERAL 

MICROBIOLOGY — 2nd Semester (4) 
DMIC 653. TECHNIQUES IN MICROSCOPY (4) 
DMIC 689. SEMINAR (1) 
DMIC 710. MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY (4) 
DMIC 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) 
DMIC 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral 

Level) 




ORAL HEALTH 
CARE DELIVERY 

Chairman: Dr. Warren M. Morganstein 

Associate Professors: Lind, Roseman 

Associate Clinical Professors: Lentz, Lisansky 

Assistant Professors: Hayden, Joseph, Morgan- 
stein, Morris, T. Snyder, Soble 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Dent, Donnelly, 
Drabkowski, Fahey, Hayes, Rapoport, Rut- 
ter, Sachs, Shulman, Webb 

Assistant Research Professors: Bonito, Williams 

Instructors: DeRenzis, Morse 

Clinical Instructor: B. Graham 

Special Lecturers: Bushel, Freedman, Graitcer, 
Hawkins, Inman, Lovett, Matanoski, 
McCauley, Moore, Weinstein 

Research Associate: C. Snyder 

Research Assistants: Barrett, Missler 

In its teaching, research and service activities 
the Department of Oral Health Care Delivery is 
committed to the development, evaluation and 
dissemination of methods for assessing and 
meeting the oral health needs of the population 
in ways that are efficient, effective and accept- 
able to both the providers and the recipients of 
care. 



26IThe Dental Program 



The three primary teaching areas are: (a) de- 
livery of care, (b) behavioral and social sciences, 
and (c) research and epidemiology. During the 
four year curriculum, the student participates in 
didactic and clinical courses supported by field 
experiences. Specific topics of instruction in- 
clude an introduction to preventive dentistry 
and community health and to delivery systems 
of health care in the first year; human factors in 
health care and epidemiologic methods in the 
second year; health professions communica- 
tions and delivery systems of oral health care in 
the third year. Dental Auxiliary Utilization and 
Training in Expanded Auxiliary Management 
are presented throughout all four years of in- 
struction. Practice administration is presented in 
the fourth year of Conjoint Sciences. 

DENTAL AUXILIARY UTILIZATION 
Program Director: Dr. Alfred J. DeRenzis 

This program is provided to teach dental stu- 
dents to practice clinical dentistry utilizing 
trained chairside dental assistants. The program 
emphasizes the need for the dentist to expand 
the capability of providing high quality dental 
services to the community through the use of 
auxiliaries. 

The program is both didactic and clinical in 
content and is included in all four years of un- 
dergraduate instruction. The major emphasis is 
provided during the third and fourth years in 
the clinical program. Students are instructed in 
operating in a seated position in order for them- 
selves, the patient and the dental assistant to be 
more comfortable and more productive. In addi- 
tion, students are presented information on 
equipment criteria as well as other aspects of 
operatory design. Seminars, motion pictures, 
single concept films, video tapes and a manual 
are used extensively in this teaching program. 

TRAINING IN EXPANDED 
AUXILIARY MANAGEMENT 

Program Director: Dr. Thomas L. Snyder 
Clinic Director: Dr. Robert E. Morris 

Training in Expanded Auxiliary Management 
(TEAM) is a program that has been developed to 
provide learning experiences for dental students 
in the proper management of a dental team 
which a dentist might utilize in practice. The 
basic objectives of this program are (a) to provide 



the dental student with a demonstration model 
of a dental care delivery system, (b) to study 
research materials and methods of presentation 
related to teaching management to dental stu- 
dents, and (c) to provide students and faculty 
with methods of evaluating the management 
process in the dental team. 

The program consists of team management 
lectures, seminars and experimental learning 
exercises presented to all students, and a simu- 
lated private practice clinical experience as an 
elective for interested senior students. Instruc- 
tional media and independent learning mate- 
rials are used extensively. 

ENRICHMENT PROGRAM 

An enrichment track for third year students is 
available as an elective in lieu of the regular third 
year course in the Department of Oral Health 
Care Delivery. The goal of the program is to 
stimulate continuing interest on the part of stu- 
dents who might choose a career in epidemiol- 
ogy or dental public health, and to provide them 
with specialized training. Each student's pro- 
gram is individualized and includes seminars, 
field experiences and a project selected by the 
student in consultation with an assigned ad- 
visor. Student selection is based upon expressed 
interest, performance in the Department's first 
and second year courses, overall academic per- 
formance and a personal interview. Enrollment 
is limited. 

OHCD 512. ORAL HEALTH CARE DELIVERY (4) 
OHCD 521. ORAL HEALTH CARE DELIVERY (4) 
OHCD 531. ORAL HEALTH CARE DELIVERY (6) 
OHCD 537. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ORAL 

HEALTH CARE DELIVERY (6-elective) 




The Dental Program 127 




ORAL PATHOLOGY 

Chairman: Dr. Martin Lunin 

Professors: Hasler, Lunin 

Associate Professors: Beckerman, Levy, Olson, 

Park, Swancar 
Associate Clinical Professors: Bloom, Brotman 
Assistant Professors: Aks, Garrison, Overholser, 

Sainio, Vandermer 
Assistant Clinical Professors: E. Levin, McKinnon 
Instructors: Arafat, Baldwin 
Clinical Instructors: Caden, Glick, Johnson, 

Kaufman, Keller, Moody, Reveley, Schop- 

pert, Steiner 
Special Lecturers: Alcox, Corio, S. Levin, 

McKusick 
Clinical Associate: Bingham 
Division Chairmen: 
Pathology: Lunin 

Oral Diagnosis /Radiology: Overholser (Act- 
ing) 

The undergraduate teaching program consists 
of an interdisciplinary course that covers the 
basic principles of pathology and medicine 
through presentation of the morphologic, chem- 
ical and physiologic changes of basic disease 
processes and important specific diseases. Em- 
phasis is placed on the diagnosis, etiology, 
pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of dis- 
ease processes in the oral cavity. The aim is to 
provide a sound basis for the differential diag- 
nosis of oral lesions and a rationale for their 
treatment. The student is provided ample op- 
portunity to develop proficiency in problem 
solving in oral diagnosis. A variety of techniques 
for examination and diagnosis are covered, in- 
cluding dental radiography. A graduate pro- 
gram is offered for students desiring specialty or 
research training. 



DPAT 521. PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICINE (12) 
DP AT 531. PRINCIPLES OF ORAL 

DIAGNOSIS/RADIOLOGY (7) 
DPAT 541. PRINCIPLES OF ORAL 

DIAGNOSIS/RADIOLOGY (7) 

For Graduate Students: 

DPAT 612. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ORAL 

613. PATHOLOGY (2, 2) 
DPAT 614. HISTOPATHOLOGY 

615. TECHNIQUES (4, 4) 
DPAT 616. ADVANCED 

617. HISTOPATHOLOGY OF ORAL 
LESIONS (3, 3) 
DPAT 618, 619. SEMINAR (1, 1) 
DPAT 799. RESEARCH (Master's Level) 
DPAT 899. RESEARCH (Doctoral Level) 

ORAL SURGERY 

Chairman: Dr. McDonald K. Hamilton 
Professor: Hamilton 
Clinical Professor: Cappuccio 
Associate Professors: DeVore, Tilghman 
Assistant Professors: Bergman, Tennenbaum 
Clinical Associates: Elliott, Hourigan, Rodriquez 
Special Lecturer: Helrich 

Introductory lectures in minor oral surgery, 
preclinical laboratory in oral surgery and lec- 
tures and demonstrations in local anesthesia are 
given during the second and third quarters of 
the second year by departmental participation in 
Basic Dental Science. Third year lectures involve 
all phases of oral surgery and general anes- 
thesia. Students are assigned to the Oral 
Surgery Clinic in block segments during their 
second, third and fourth years for progressive 
participation in oral surgical procedures. Fourth 
year students are assigned to the Hospital for 
operating room experience and for general anes- 
thesia experience. They also take night calls with 
the Oral Surgery intern. The department par- 
ticipates in three years of Conjoint Sciences. 



DSUR 531 
DSUR 541 



ORAL SURGERY (5) 
ORAL SURGERY (5) 



For Graduate Students: 

DSUR 601. CLINICAL ANESTHESIOLOGY (6) 

DSUR 602. ADVANCED ANESTHESIOLOGY (3) 

DSUR 605. SURGICAL ANATOMY (3) 

DSUR 609. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ORAL 

SURGERY (Credit by arrangement) 
DSUR 620. GENERAL DENTAL ORAL SURGERY 

(4) 
DSUR 621. ADVANCED ORAL SURGERY (4) 
DSUR 799. RESEARCH 



28 IThe Dental Program 



ORTHODONTICS 

Chairman: Dr. John M. Grewe 

Professor: Grewe 

Associate Clinical Professors: Kress, Swinehart 

Assistant Professors: Coccaro, Stein, Tucker 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Branoff, Dunn, E. 

Goldman, Markin, Pavlick, Saini, Scorna- 

vacca 
Special Lecturers: Christiansen, Frazier, Hamlet, 

Johnston 
Associate Staff: Kreutzer 

The program of instruction in orthodontics is 
divided into three phases. Phase one consists of 
departmental participation in lectures on 
growth and development presented in Conjoint 
Sciences I and preclinical laboratory exercises 
presented in Basic Dental Science II. The second 
phase consists of didactic instruction in ortho- 
dontics which is designed so that the student 
should be able to anticipate and detect incipient 
malocclusions, provide appropriate and inter- 
ceptive preventive measures where necessary, 
recognize conditions which require compre- 
hensive orthodontic care and use orthodontic 
principles as an adjunct to treatment procedures 
in other phases of dental practice. The third 
phase includes clinical experiences in ortho- 
dontic evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of 
minor malocclusions, space management and 
habit control. 



ORTH 531. 
ORTH 541. 



ORTHODONTICS (2) 
ORTHODONTICS (2) 



PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 

Chairman: Dr. Donald J. Forrester 

Professor: Forrester 

Associate Professors: Owen, Shelton, Wagner 

Associate Clinical Professors: Balis, Kihn 

Assistant Professors: Berkowitz, Biederman, Can- 
ion, C. Greeley 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Flynn, Fox, S. Levin, 
Tinanoff, Weinstein 

Special Lecturer: Landis 

The student is introduced to the performance 
of dentistry for children by means of lectures 
and laboratory projects while participating in 
Basic Dental Science. Didactic instruction con- 
sists of a series of lectures. Particular attention is 
devoted to diagnosis and treatment planning, 
preventive dentistry procedures including 
fluoride therapy, non-punitive patient man- 



agement techniques incorporating the use of 
psychopharmacologic agents, treatment of 
traumatic injuries to the primary and young 
permanent dentition, restorative procedures in 
primary teeth, pulpal therapy and interceptive 
orthodontics. Emphasis is focused upon diag- 
nostic procedures and the treatment of incipient 
malocclusions in the primary and mixed denti- 
tions. 

PEDS 531. PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY (8) 
PEDS 541. PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY (6) 

PERIODONTICS 

Chairman: Dr. John J. Bergquist 

Professors: Bergquist, Bowers, Pridgeon 

Clinical Professor: Halpert 

Associate Professor: Ratliff 

Associate Clinical Professors: Kessler, Plessett, 

Sobkov, Zupnik 
Assistant Professors: Chmar, Daley, Hayduk 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Berger, Burks, Davis, 

Goldman, Golski, Halpern, Lever, 

Livingston, Mislowsky, Nurin, Sklar, Stig- 

litz, Winson, Wollman 
Instructor: Walker 
Associate Staff: Organ 

Students are introduced to fundamental 
periodontics in lectures during the first and sec- 
ond years. Clinical experience begins late in the 
second year. In the third year, students have 
didactic exposure to advanced periodontal pro- 
cedures. Third and fourth year students enter 
into a learning contract that delineates a set of 
basic minimum clinical experiences. Interested 
students have the opportunity to choose from a 
broad range of additional experiences and to 
contract for both additional experience and the 
grade the student feels these experiences war- 
rant. Thus, the individual student has substan- 
tial involvement in establishing his educational 
goals. 

PERI 531. PERIODONTICS (11) 
PERI 541. PERIODONTICS (11) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Chairman: Dr. Raymond M. Burgison 
Professors: Burgison, Rudo 
Associate Professor: Thut 
Associate Clinical Professor: Dolle 
Assistant Professors: Crossley, Myslinski 
Clinical Associates: Dietz, Taylor 



The program of instruction in Pharmacology 
is divided into three phases. Phase I includes a 
thorough study of basic concepts and principles 
in pharmacology using only prototype drugs. 
Emphasis is placed on the mechanism of action 
of drugs, their absorption, distribution, 
metabolism, excretion and drug interactions. 
Phase II deals with clinical aspects of oral and 
nutritional therapeutics presented in the various 
Conjoint Sciences programs. Special attention is 
given to clinically useful drugs, their indications 
and contraindications. Phase III, designed for 
the graduate and postdoctoral students, is an 
in-depth coverage of current topics in general 
pharmacology, biotransformation of drugs, 
molecular pharmacology, pharmacology of local 
and general anesthetics, and dental toxicology. 

DPHR 521. GENERAL PHARMACOLOGY AND 
THERAPEUTICS (5) 

For Graduate Students: 

DPHR 606. GENERAL PHARMACOLOGY AND 

THERAPEUTICS (6) 
DPHR 616. BIOTRANSFORMATION OF DRUGS 

(3) 
DPHR 619. DENTAL PHARMACOLOGY 

SEMINAR (1) 
DPHR 626. MOLECULAR PHARMACOLOGY (3) 
DPHR 636. PHARMACOLOGY OF ANESTHETIC 

DRUGS (3) 
DPHR 656. DENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND 

THERAPEUTICS (2) 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Chairman: Dr. John I. White 

Professor: White 

Associate Professor: Kidder 

Assistant Professors: Bennett, Burke, Nardell 

Instructor: Staling 

Lecturer: Buxbaum 

Lectures cover the following major areas of 
organ-system physiology: cell membranes, ex- 
citable cells, nervous system, special senses, cir- 
culation, respiration, renal function, digestion. 
Laboratory experiments are limited almost en- 
tirely to videotaped demonstrations and films. 
Dentally oriented applied physiology is taught 
as part of the Conjoint Sciences. 

DPHS 513. PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGY (5) 

For Graduate Students: 

DPHS 611. PRINCIPLES OF MAMMALIAN 

PHYSIOLOGY (6) 
DPHS 612. PHYSIOLOGY APPLIED TO 

CLINICAL DENTISTRY (1) 



The Dental Program 129 

DPHS 618. ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY (1) 
DPHS 628. RESEARCH (1-3) 
DPHS 799. THESIS RESEARCH (Master's Level) 
DPHS 899. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Doctoral 
Level) 



REMOVABLE 
PROSTHODONTICS 

Chairman: Dr. Frank C. Jerbi 

Professors: Jerbi, Ramsey 

Associate Professors: Choudhary, Fetchero, 

Leupold, Reese, Rodgers 
Assistant Professors: DeSai, Quaranrillo, Wagley 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Mort, Ward, Wisman 
Instructor: Elias 
Associate Staff: King, Rutherford 

Removable prosthodontics concerns the arts 
and sciences involved in replacing lost dental 
and associated structures by means of remov- 
able artificial substitutes. These substitutes are 
designed and constructed to restore and main- 
tain function, appearance, speech, comfort, 
health and the self-image of the patient. The 
program of instruction is divided into three 
phases consisting of departmental participation 
in Basic Dental Science II, didactic instruction on 
the effective management of clinical prostho- 
dontic procedures, and the clinical treatment of 
dental patients under the guidance of staff 
members. The Department also participates in 
the Conjoint Sciences program of the School. 

REMV 531. REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS (8) 
REMV 541. REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS (8) 



SENIOR DENTAL EXTERNSHIP 

The senior dental externship is designed to 
provide an opportunity for selected students to 
work in private dental offices with established 
dental practitioners, who serve as preceptors. 
The student spends from eight to twelve weeks 
of the summer between the third and fourth 
years in the program. This educational experi- 
ence is designed to allow students to observe 
and participate in the operation of a dental prac- 
tice; to encourage practitioner-student inter- 
change concerning concepts in dentistry; and to 
develop the student's insight into the role of the 
general practitioner, including his relationship 
with other health professionals, community 
health resources and the community at large. 



30IThe Dental Program 



ACCELERATED PROFESSIONAL 
TRAINING PROGRAM (APT) 




APT is an accelerated curriculum de- 
signed to satisfy the requirements for the 
D.D.S. degree in three calendar years. The 
reduction in time is accomplished primarily 
in the following ways: 
— restructuring of the traditional courses by 
integration of subject matter to dem- 
onstrate correlations between basic sci- 
ence and clinical subjects 
— selection of course content based upon 

clinical relevancy 
— adoption of self-instructional methods 
reinforced by seminar discussions and 
close faculty support 
The APT Program is limited to ten stu- 
dents per class. Students are selected on 
the basis of good college performance, bet- 
ter than average Dental Admission Test 
scores and a high level of maturity and 
motivation. These criteria have been suc- 
cessfully used to select classes since 1972. 



The Program's first class was graduated in 
June, 1975, having met or surpassed expec- 
tations. The students' early introduction to 
clinic patients helps to produce well- 
rounded general dentists, astute in diag- 
nosis and treatment planning as well as 
skilled in technical procedures. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Director: Dr. James R. Swancar 

Associate Professors: Haroth, Olson, Sisca, Swan- 
car 

Instructor: Gingell 

(Consultative assistance as well as basic 
teaching support is provided by basic 
science and clinical departments in the 
regular program) 

The general objectives of the first year courses 
are to provide the background in basic sciences 
essential to dental practice, knowledge of the 



The Dental Program 131 



most prevalent dental diseases and training in 
basic forms of therapy; and to introduce the stu- 
dent to clinical practice. 

The second year builds upon the teaching of 
basic sciences through an integrated course of 
clinical physiology and medicine. The student 
continues to apply basic principles of therapy 
while being introduced to more advanced 
methods. 

The third, or senior, year is devoted to the 
achievement of competency in all clinical disci- 
plines. The student's background is broadened 
by the addition of courses in pharmacology, a 
study of less common oral diseases and delivery 
systems for oral health care. A course entitled 
Seminar provides a forum for guest lectures on a 
variety of more advanced subjects. 

YEAR I 

DAPT 500. ESSENTIALS OF 

HUMAN BIOLOGY (4) 

A general study of the cells, tissues, organs and 
organ systems of the body from the gross, micro- 
scopic and applied functional aspects, as well as 
integrated material on basic human physiology 
and biochemistry. 

DAFT 501. SOCIAL AND 

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (2) 

A pre-clinical introductory course designed to re- 
late the dentist to his role within the community 
and the profession. 

DAPT 502. RADIOLOGY (3) 

The basics of the science of ionizing radiation, 
production of x-rays and the various techniques 
of dental roentgenography including the proces- 
sing, viewing and interpretation of films. 

DAFT 503. MECHANISMS OF DISEASE (3) 

The basic mechanisms of pathology and the basic 
tenets of microbiology sequenced in the cur- 
riculum to provide a background for the dis- 
cussion of caries and periodontal disease. 

DAPT 504. STOMATOGNATHOLOGY (11) 

The gross, microscopic and functional anatomy of 
the head, facial region, oral cavity and associated 
organs (temporomandibular articulation). Also 
included are a study of the embryology of facial 
and dental organ systems as well as a study of 
dental occlusion. 

DAPT 505. REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS (8) 
A series of lectures covering the diagnosis, treat- 
ment planning and rationale for each procedure 
involved in the fabrication of a complete pros- 
thodontic appliance. Clinical experience, which 
allows the student the opportunity to simultane- 
ously apply the knowledge and procedures 
learned in lectures, is also provided. 



DAPT 506. CLINICAL DENTAL SCIENCE (3) 

Practical experience in various laboratory proce- 
dures and use of dental materials. 

DAPT 507. DIAGNOSIS AND 

TREATMENT PLANNING (2) 

The methods of history taking, patient examina- 
tion and clinical and laboratory aids; and the prin- 
ciples to be followed in arriving at a diagnosis, 
prognosis and rational plan of treatment. 

DAPT 510. DENTAL CARIES (3) 

The diagnosis, etiology, pathogenesis, 
epidemiology and prevention of dental caries 
with emphasis upon the correlation of the basic 
science disciplines to their clinical significance in 
caries. 

DAPT 511. PERIODONTICS (4) 

A study of gingival and periodontal disease in- 
cluding the clinical and histopathologic findings, 
etiologic factors and methods of prevention. The 
rationale for treatment is included with an intro- 
duction to treatment techniques. 

DAPT 512. RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY (8) 

The basics of intracoronal restorative procedures 
including diagnosis and treatment planning, and 
pulpal responses to these procedures. The stu- 
dent has an opportunity to perform these proce- 
dures in the laboratory; when competency in the 
laboratory has been demonstrated, the proce- 
dures are performed on patients. 




32 IThe Dental Program 



DAFT 513. ANESTHESIA AND 

PAIN CONTROL (3) 

The neurophysiology and anatomy relative to 
local anesthesia and pain control. The techniques 
of dental local anesthesia, the pharmacology of 
anesthesia agents as well as the use of pre- and 
post-anesthetic agents are included. 

DAPT 514. PHYSIOLOGIC PATHOLOGY (5) 

An interdisciplinary course consisting of anatom- 
ical, physiological and pathological considera- 
tions of systemic disease. 

DAPT 515. CLINICAL DENTISTRY (5) 

An introductory clinical experience for first year 
students consisting predominantly of complete 
denture construction. In addition, students who 
have demonstrated competency in anesthesia and 
restorative techniques may begin treating restora- 
tive patients. 



YEAR II 

DAPT 520. FIXED RESTORATIVE 

DENTISTRY (20) 

The techniques and theory of fixed prosthodontic 
restorations. An opportunity is given to the stu- 
dent to perform these procedures in the labora- 
tory followed by clinical application on patients in 
the clinic. 

DAPT 521. REMOVABLE 

PROSTHODONTICS (15) 

Presentation of the theory and practice of remov- 
able partial prosthodontics and continuation of 
the clinical application of removable prostho- 
dontics. 

DAFT 522. ENDODONTICS (8) 

The theory and practice of endodontics. Follow- 
ing the laboratory procedures, the students begin 
performing these procedures on patients in the 
clinic. 

DAPT 523. PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY (6) 

A study of the procedures and techniques used in 
pediatric dentistry, with special emphasis on pre- 
ventive procedures, patient management and the 
treatment of handicapped children. 

DAPT 524. ORTHODONTICS (4) 

A comprehensive study of this specialty, with 
particular emphasis on the study of growth and 
development and the techniques and theories in- 
volved in cephalometric diagnosis. 

DAPT 525. PERIODONTICS (20) 

A continuation of DAPT 511, including the tech- 
niques of periodontal therapy. Emphasis is placed 
upon treatment techniques which are applicable 
in general dental practice. The course stresses 
clinical experience in periodontal therapy tech- 
niques. 



DAPT 526. PHYSIOLOGIC PATHOLOGY (8) 
A continuation of DAPT 514. 

DAPT 527. ORAL SURGERY (7) 

Surgical principles, oral surgical instruments and 
their application, multiple extractions and al- 
veoloplasty, as well as medical emergencies. 

DAPT 530. DIAGNOSIS AND RADIOLOGY (9) 
Application of the principles of diagnosis, treat- 
ment planning and radiology in a clinical envi- 
ronment. 



YEAR HI 

DAFT 540. ORAL PATHOLOGY (8) 

A general outline of diseases occurring within the 
oral cavity as well as the oral manifestations of 
systemic diseases. 

DAFT 541. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (2) 

The mechanism of action, metabolism, excretion, 
indications, contraindications and drug interac- 
tions of clinically useful drugs. 

DAPT 542. ORAL HEALTH 

CARE DELIVERY (5) 

A course designed to prepare the student for his 
role in his practice, his profession and the com- 
munity. Seminar topics include epidemiology, in- 
terpretation of data, literature evaluation, pur- 
chase of dental care and dental manpower con- 
siderations. 

DAFT 543. SEMINAR (10) 

A general topic series of conferences including 
current literature review, review of noteworthy 
histories of cases completed by students in the 
group, and special topics presented by specialists 
from the clinical departments. 

DAPT 550. FIXED RESTORATIVE 

DENTISTRY (10) 

An extension of the clinical experiences in DAPT 
520. 

DAPT 551. REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS (6) 
An extension of the clinical experiences in DAPT 
505 and 521. 

DAPT 552. ENDODONTICS (4) 

A continuation of the clinical experiences in DAPT 
522. 

DAPT 553. PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY (5) 
A continuation of DAPT 523. 

DAFT 554. ORTHODONTICS (3) 

A continuation of the clinical experiences in DAFT 
524. 

DAPT 555. PERIODONTICS (12) 

The clinical continuation of DAPT 511 and 525. 
DAPT 556. ORAL SURGERY (5) 

The clinical continuation of DAPT 527. 
DAPT 557. DIAGNOSIS AND RADIOLOGY (5) 

The clinical continuation of DAPT 530. 



Dental Hygiene Program 133 

DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM 




GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Dental School offers a four-year bac- 
calaureate degree program in dental 
hygiene. The curriculum includes two 
years of preprofessional courses; a third 
year of intensive dental and dental hygiene 
study with clinical application; and a fourth 
year of advanced clinical practice and upper 
division electives in a recommended area of 
study, which will constitute a minor related 
to a specialized area of dental hygiene prac- 
tice. The first two years of the preprofes- 
sional curriculum include general educa- 
tion requirements of the University of 
Maryland, dental hygiene education 
accreditation requirements and elective 
lower division courses in one of the rec- 



ommended minor areas of study. COM- 
PLETION OF THE TWO-YEAR PREPRO- 
FESSIONAL CURRICULUM AT ONE OF 
THE THREE UNIVERSITY OF MARY- 
LAND CAMPUSES (COLLEGE PARK, 
EASTERN SHORE OR BALTIMORE 
COUNTY) OR AT ANOTHER UNIVER- 
SITY IS REQUIRED FOR ELIGIBILITY TO 
APPLY FOR ENROLLMENT AS A 
JUNIOR STANDING STUDENT IN THE 
DENTAL SCHOOL ON THE BALTIMORE 
CAMPUS. However, enrollment as a pre- 
dental hygiene student at any campus does 
not guarantee admission to the Dental 
Hygiene Program on the Baltimore 
Campus. A suggested course sequence for 
the four years follows: 



34IDental Hygiene Program 



DENTAL HYGIENE CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 



1st 2nd 

Sem Sem 

English 101 (composition) ... 3 

Zoology 101 4 

Chemistry 103, 104 4 4 

Psychology 100 3 

Sociology 100 3 

^Humanities 9_ 

Total 14 16 



Zoology 201, 202 

Microbiology 200 

Nutrition 200 . . . 

** Social Science . . . 

* Humanities 

Electives 



1st 


2nd 


Sem 


Sem 


4 


4 


4 






3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



Total 



17 16 



JUNIOR YEAR Credits 

1st 2nd 
Sem Sem 

DHYG 330 

Oral Biology 7 

DHYG 331 

Oral Pathobiology 6 

DHYG 333 

Prevention and Control 

of Oral Diseases 6 

DHYG 334 

Methods and Materials in 

Dentistry 3 

DHYG 335 

Principles of Dental 

Hygiene Practice 2 

DHYG 336-7 
Patients and the 

Community 3 3 

DPHR 332 

General Pharmacology and 

Oral Therapeutics 3_ 

Total 16 17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Credits 



1st 2nd 
Sem Sem 

DHYG 340-1 

Advanced Clinical 

Practice 4 4 

Upper Division 

Electives in Minor 12 6 

Electives (upper or 

lower division) 3 3 

DHYG 348-9 

Dental Hygiene 

Practicum 

(Optional) (3) (3) 

Total 19 13 



TOTAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS — 124 credits 



•Humanities: Courses must be selected from at least three of the following areas: literature, history, philosophy, 

fine arts, speech, math or language. 
'Social Sciences: General Psychology and Sociology are required, with the remaining six credits selected from 

courses in psychology, sociology, government and politics, economics, geography, geology or anthropology. 



Dental Hygiene Program 135 




36 IDental Hygiene Program 



It is the student's responsibility to be- 
come familiar with other courses available 
and to check on prerequisites of courses. 
Therefore, it is imperative that the student 
meet with a dental hygiene advisor AT 
LEAST once each semester. 

Although courses may be interchanged 
during the first two years, it is recom- 
mended that Chemistry precede Micro- 
biology and Nutrition to facilitate its 
application to these two subjects. It should 
be noted that General Zoology is a pre- 
requisite for Human Anatomy and 
Physiology at the University of Maryland. 
Among the philosophy courses offered at 
the University, the following (listed in 
order of preference) are considered to be 
the most appropriate for the education of 
the dental hygienist: Ethics, Elementary 
Logic and Semantics or Introduction to 
Philosophy. 

To prepare for upper division courses in 
the selected minor during the senior year, 
the student should take 12 hours of lower 
division electives in one of the following 
areas of study: basic sciences, social sci- 
ences or health education. Lower division 
courses in one of these minors will be ac- 
cepted as prerequisites for upper division 
courses in education, should this minor be 
elected during the senior year. It is also 
possible for a student to complete preden- 
tistry requirements in lieu of a specific 
minor. The dental hygiene faculty will ad- 
vise students in the selection of courses for 
one of the recommended minors. 



ADMISSIONS AND 

APPLICATION 

PROCEDURES 

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 

High school students who wish to enroll 
in the predental hygiene curriculum should 
request applications directly from the Ad- 
missions Office of the University of Mary- 
land, College Park, Maryland 20742; the 
University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 



5401 Wilkens Avenue, Catonsville, Mary- 
land 21228; or the University of Maryland, 
Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 
21853. 

It is recommended that young women or 
men who wish to prepare for a bac- 
calaureate degree program in dental 
hygiene pursue an academic program in 
high school, including biology, chemistry, 
math and physics. 

PREDENTAL HYGIENE STUDENTS 

Predental hygiene students who have 
completed three semesters of the prepro- 
fessional curriculum should request an ap- 
plication at the end of their third semester 
from the Director of Admissions and 
Registrations, Room 132, Howard Hall, 
University of Maryland at Baltimore, 660 
West Redwood Street, Baltimore, Md. 
21201 or from the dental hygiene advisor on 
the College Park or UMBC campus. Appli- 
cations for the Baltimore Campus should be 
received no later than February 1 prior to 
the fall semester for which the student 
wishes to enroll. 

Only those students who have success- 
fully completed the two-year preprofes- 
sional curriculum at one of the three Uni- 
versity of Maryland campuses or another 
college or university will be eligible for ad- 
mission to the Dental School. REGISTRA- 
TION IN THE PREPROFESSIONAL CUR- 
RICULUM DOES NOT ASSURE THE 
STUDENT OF ACCEPTANCE INTO THE 
DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM. All 
applicants will be required to submit Dental 
Hygiene Aptitude Test scores (DHAT in- 
formation is available from the Department 
of Dental Hygiene) and to appear for a per- 
sonal interview at the discretion of the Den- 
tal Hygiene Admissions Committee. The 
Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test must be 
taken on or before the February test date 
immediately prior to the fall semester for 
which the student is applying. In addition, 
it is recommended that the DHAT not be 
taken until the applicant's sophomore year 
of college. A minimum average of C in the 



Dental Hygiene Program 137 



preprofessional curriculum will be re- 
quired, and preference will be given those 
students who have maintained high 
scholastic records. 

Students who are offered admission will 
be required to submit a deposit along with a 
letter of intent to enroll. The deposit will be 
credited toward tuition when the student 
registers, and will not be refunded in the 
event of failure to enroll. 




Oral Surgery Demostration, 1940's 

REGISTERED DENTAL HYGIENISTS 

Registered dental hygienists who have 
completed a two-year accredited dental 
hygiene program at another college or uni- 
versity and are interested in obtaining a 
baccalaureate degree in the Post-Certificate 
Program at the Dental School should apply 
for enrollment in the preprofessional cur- 
riculum at one of the three University of 
Maryland campuses. It is imperative that 
the applicant seek consultation with the 
dental hygiene advisor on the College Park 
| or UMBC campus in order to determine 
l which previous dental hygiene courses will 
be transferrable and how many additional 
| preprofessional and lower division elective 
i courses will be required for eligibility in the 
j Post-Certificate Program. 

Applications for the Baltimore Campus 
j should be received no later than February 1 
( prior to the fall semester for which the stu- 
; dent wishes to enroll. At the discretion of 
j the Dental Hygiene Admissions Commit- 
, tee, the applicant may be asked to appear 



for an interview. Students who are offered 
admission will be required to submit a de- 
posit along with a letter of intent to enroll. 
The deposit will be credited toward tuition 
when the student registers, and will not be 
refunded in the event of failure to enroll. 
Applicants should note that enrollment in 
the Post-Certificate Program at the Dental 
School is limited. 



GRADUATION 
REQUIREMENTS 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree 
must complete general education require- 
ments, dental hygiene prerequisites in the 
preprofessional curriculum, dental hygiene 
course requirements at the Dental School, 
and elective courses in a minor area of 
study totaling 36 semester credit hours, of 
which at least 18 must be in upper division 
courses. Residency requirements stipulate 
that the last 30 semester credits be taken at 
the University of Maryland, with 12 credits 
in upper division courses and a minimum 
of 12 in the student's minor. An average of 
C in both the preprofessional and profes- 
sional curricula is required for graduation. 
Academic progress, attendance and finan- 
cial obligation will be governed by the 
policies of the Dental School. Students 
must complete a total of 124 credits and will 
be awarded a Bachelor of Science degree by 
the University of Maryland. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Chairperson: Mrs. JoAnne I. Pepin 
Professor: Hasler (Supervising Dentist) 
Associate Clinical Professor: Sobkov 
Assistant Professors: Byrd, Koch, Pepin, Schoettle 
Instructors: Duvall, Foster, Hatfield, Llewellyn, 
Mulford, Smith, Zaborny 

NOTE: Lectures and instructional as- 
sistance are provided in all courses by 
the Chairman and/or faculty of other 
departments in the Dental School. 



38 IDental Hygiene Program 



DHYG 330. ORAL BIOLOGY (7) 

The concepts of embryology and histology with 
emphasis on the head, face and oral cavity and the 
microscopic study of these tissues; the study of 
anatomic structures of the head, neck and oral 
cavity and applicable physiology; the elements of 
the morphologic characteristics and physiologic 
relationships of teeth and supporting tissues; and 
an introduction to the principles and procedures 
of clinical techniques with emphasis on the pre- 
liminary diagnostic work-up, oral hygiene meas- 
ures, patient education, topical fluoride applica- 
tions and the oral prophylaxis. 

DHYG 331. ORAL PATHOBIOLOGY (6) 

The nature, occurrence and etiology of general 
and oral pathologic entities and abnormalities 
with major emphasis on the oral cavity; the prin- 
ciples of the production, properties and effects of 
x-ray, concepts of radiation safety and techniques 
for exposing and processing radiographs for use 
in the detection of pathologic conditions; the basic 
concepts and techniques for determining hard 
and soft tissue conditions, dental caries, 
periodontal disease, malocclusion, oral cancer, 
stains and accretions, and factors to consider be- 
fore providing clinical dental hygiene services; 
and the clinical application of principles and pro- 
cedures for the prevention and control of oral 
diseases. 

DPHR 332. GENERAL PHARMACOLOGY 
AND ORAL THERAPEUTICS (3) 

Essentially the same course material as DPHR 521, 

dental curriculum. 

DHYG 333. PREVENTION AND CONTROL 

OF ORAL DISEASES (6) 

The principles and procedures for the prevention 
of oral disease including dental health education, 
oral hygiene measures, dietary control of dental 
caries, use of fluorides and the oral prophylaxis; 
and advanced study in the etiology and control of 
periodontal disease and oral prophylaxis tech- 
niques. 

DHYG 334. METHODS AND 

MATERIALS IN DENTISTRY (3) 

Introduction to the science of dental materials, 
including the composition and utilization of den- 
tal materials as they apply to clinical dental 
hygiene procedures, dental assisting and patient 
education; introduction to dental specialties and 
their relationship to dental hygiene practice; and 
the elements of dental assisting and office proce- 
dures. 

DHYG 335. PRINCIPLES OF 

DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE (2) 

The history of dentistry and dental hygiene; the 
principles of ethics and jurisprudence; the 



philosophy, development of and current trends in 
dental auxiliary education; and professional 
development as it relates to the role of organized 
dentistry, continuing education, evaluation of 
scientific literature and research contributions. 

DHYG 336-7. PATIENTS AND 

THE COMMUNITY (3-3) 

The elements of human behavior, principles of 
learning and methods of teaching as they relate to 
patient education; the principles of community or 
public dental health including social and political 
factors affecting dentistry, the responsibilities of 
the dental profession in the community and par- 
ticipation in community health activities; the basic 
principles of communicating with individuals and 
groups, public speaking, public relations (includ- 
ing public information); and the use of audio- 
visual aids. 

DHYG 340-1. ADVANCED 

CLINICAL PRACTICE (4-4) 

Senior year clinic and seminar for the application 
of all knowledge and principles necessary for the 
practice of dental hygiene. Major emphasis will be 
given to preventive periodontics and patient edu- 
cation. Students will work closely with dental 
students to provide additional orientation to aux- 
iliary utilization. 

DHYG 348-9. DENTAL 

HYGIENE PRACTICUM (3-3) Optional 

The integration of upper division elective courses 
in the student's minor with a special area of dental 
hygiene clinical practice, teaching, community 
dental health or research. 




-,* 



Advanced Education Programs 139 



ADVANCED EDUCATION 

PROGRAMS 




Dental Laboratory, 1912 



GRADUATE EDUCATION 

Graduate programs leading to the Master 
of Science (M.S. ) and Doctor of Philosophy 
(Ph.D.) degrees are offered by the Depart- 
ments of Anatomy, Biochemistry, Micro- 
biology, Oral Pathology and Physiology. A 
Master of Science degree is offered by the 
Department of Oral Surgery and is de- 
scribed under Advanced Specialty Educa- 
tion. 

Programs are also available for those who 
wish to pursue a graduate degree in one of 
the basic sciences concurrently with clinic 
specialty education. The combined 
degree/specialty training program gener- 
ally requires three years for the Master's 
degree and five years for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. These programs are 
highly individualized and are developed 
according to the needs and wishes of the 
candidate. 

The Baltimore campus Graduate School 
Bulletin and application for admission may 
be obtained from The Graduate School, 
University of Maryland at Baltimore, 525 
West Redwood Street, Baltimore, Mary- 
land 21201. 



ADVANCED 
SPECIALTY EDUCATION 

Director of Advanced Specialty Education and 
Special Clinical Programs: Dr. Wilbur O. 
Ramsey 

The University of Maryland Dental 
School, recognizing its obligation to the 
State of Maryland and to the nation to edu- 
cate competent specialists in all areas of 
clinical dentistry, has had since 1970 a full 
program of specialty education in which all 
disciplines are represented. 

The Dental School provides advanced 
specialty education leading to eligibility for 
specialty board certification in the follow- 
ing areas: endodontics, oral surgery, 
orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, perio- 
dontics and prosthodontics. All programs 
meet accreditation requirements of the 
Commission on Accreditation of Dental 
and Dental Auxiliary Educational Programs 
of the Council on Dental Education of the 
American Dental Association. Students 
successfully completing any of these pro- 
grams are awarded a certificate by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 



40 / Advanced Education Programs 



Those matriculating in the clinical spe- 
cialty programs are registered as special 
students in the Graduate School of the 
University and will receive credit for 
graduate courses included in their specialty 
education. Students are required to show 
proof of malpractice insurance. 

The specialty programs are all developed 
with a balance between the biologic sci- 
ences and advanced clinical instruction. 
The facilities of the Dental School, School of 
Medicine, University of Maryland Hospital 
and other related institutions of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland at Baltimore are used for 
didactic as well as clinical instruction. In 
addition, facilities for research are available 
in the departments in which the students 
are enrolled or in other related depart- 
ments. 

All applicants must have a D.D.S. or 
D.M.D. degree or equivalent and give evi- 
dence of high scholastic achievement. A 
brochure describing all specialty programs 
may be obtained from the Director of Ad- 
vanced Specialty Education. Applications 
for the Oral Surgery program should be 
requested from the Chairman of the De- 
partment of Oral Surgery; applications for 
all other programs, from the Director of 
Advanced Specialty Education. 

ENDODONTICS 

The program in endodontics is designed 
to prepare the candidate for clinical prac- 
tice, teaching and research in endodontics 
and meets the requirements for specialty 
training of the American Board of Endo- 
dontics. The program encompasses a 
minimum of 21 months of full-time instruc- 
tion beginning in September. The signifi- 
cant relationship between the basic biologic 
sciences and the clinical practice of endo- 
dontics is emphasized. The biologic and 
clinical sciences are integrated for presenta- 
tion over the entire training period in order 
to better relate these two areas. In addition, 
courses in other clinical dental, social and 
behavioral sciences are included in order to 



broaden the knowledge and development 
of the student. 

ENDO 568. ENDODONTIC 

SEMINARS 1-4 credits 

Under the major topics of the dental pulp 
and the periapical and supporting struc- 
tures, the physiology, microbiology, 
pathology and biochemistry of these tissues 
are discussed in depth and interrelated. 
This enables the student to formulate firm 
foundations for his diagnostic and treat- 
ment principles. Other seminar series deal 
with endodontic treatment planning, 
endodontic diagnosis and a thorough and 
critical review of the literature directly and 
indirectly related to the specialty. 

ENDO 569. CLINICAL 

ENDODONTICS 6 credits 

The development of clinical expertise is 
gradually evolved by introducing the stu- 
dent to a wide variety of situations of vary- 
ing complexity. With certain criteria in 
mind, the selection of either conservative or 
surgical procedures is primarily the respon- 
sibility of the second year student, while the 
first year student is invited to act as first 
assistant or photographer. After the stu- 
dent has demonstrated his competence in 
clinical as well as surgical procedures, 
supervision and advice are available as de- 
sired. The student is encouraged to exercise 
independence and pursue situations as he 
sees fit. 

ENDO 579. SPECIAL PROBLEMS 
IN ENDODONTICS 1-5 credits 

No courses at this time. 




Advanced Education Programs 141 



ORAL SURGERY 

A thirty-six to forty-eight month educa- 
tional program leading to eligibility for 
examination by the American Board of Oral 
Surgery is offered; a Master of Science De- 
gree is offered as an option. The first year of 
the program is an internship in Oral 
Surgery at the University of Maryland 
Hospital. Two first-year residents are 
selected annually. First year residents are 
assigned to an on-call, nightly and 
weekend schedule on a rotating basis. In 
addition to clinical oral surgery in a large 
metropolitan teaching hospital, first year 
residents participate in oral surgery, oral 
pathology and oral surgery-orthodontic 
conferences, and have a four month as- 
I signment with the Department of Anesthe- 
siology. During the summer between the 
first and second years, they divide their 
time between clinical teaching of oral 
surgery in the Dental School, an assign- 
ment to the Shock-Trauma Unit of Univer- 
sity Hospital and vacation. The second year 
of the program is a second year residency at 
the University of Maryland Hospital and 
Dental School. Graduate instruction in 
head and neck anatomy, advanced oral 
pathology, clinical pathology, physical 
diagnosis, pharmacology, physiology and 
microbiology is offered. Second year resi- 
dents participate in undergraduate dental 
student instruction during the academic 
year in the oral surgery clinic in the Dental 
School. In addition, they are introduced to 
major oral surgery procedures in the 
operating room. The third year is a 12- 
month residency at the University of Mary- 
land Hospital and other affiliated hospitals. 
Residents are responsible for supervising 
first and second year residents and assume 
responsibility for care of hospitalized pa- 
tients. Residents rotate on a three-month 
basis to University of Maryland Hospital, 
Baltimore City Hospital, Mercy Hospital 
and Provident Hospital. They also spend 
one month on the Maxillo-Facial service of 
Hospital de Empleado in Lima, Peru. Dur- 



ing the third year, students participate in all 
conferences held by the Department and 
receive advanced instruction in oral 
surgery. Research is considered an impor- 
tant factor and all trainees are expected to 
complete an original research project. 

ORTHODONTICS 

The program in orthodontics is designed 
to prepare a qualified dental graduate for 
the practice of orthodontics and meets the 
requirements for specialty training of the 
American Board of Orthodontics. The 23- 
month program, which begins in July of 
each year, is planned to provide both clini- 
cal experience and essential didactic 
theory. In addition to orthodontic courses 
within the Department, courses and semi- 
nars are given by other faculty within the 
Dental School and the University of Mary- 
land. Students are also required to attend 
seminars at other universities and the Na- 
tional Institutes of Health. Research activity 
is an integral part of the educational pro- 
gram in orthodontics. Students are re- 
quired to initiate and complete an original 
and independent investigation. 

ORTH 568. ORTHODONTIC 

SEMINARS 1-7 credits 

Lectures, seminars and discussions ac- 
quaint the student with the basic technical 
aspects of orthodontics and the correlation 
between technical and clinical procedures 
and cephalometrics. Case presentations 
and lectures on topics of clinical interest 
relate to the students' cases and clinical ex- 
periences. 

ORTH 569. CLINICAL 

ORTHODONTICS 5-6 credits 

The student is given experience in diag- 
nosis, patient management and treatment 
methodology, and develops mechanical 
skills from exposure to a wide range of 
malocclusion types among clinic patients. 

ORTH 579. SPECIAL PROBLEMS 
IN ORTHODONTICS 1-7 credits 

The role of genetics in orthodontics and 
theoretical mechanics is presented to 



All Advanced Education Programs 



orthodontic students. Orthodontic diag- 
nosis and recent advances in the field of 
orthodontics are discussed from a review of 
pertinent literature. Literature review also 
acquaints the student with the wide range 
of clinical orthodontic theory. A research 
project is conducted and reported in manu- 
script form by all orthodontic students. 
Seminars, laboratory demonstrations and 
case discussions are presented to provide 
instruction in orthodontic theory, diagnosis 
and treatment problems essential to the 
training of postdoctoral students in perio- 
dontics, prosthodontics, pediatric dentistry 
and oral surgery. 

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 

The pediatric dentistry program is of 
twenty-four months' duration and meets 
the requirements for specialty training of 
the American Board of Pedodontics. The 




major sites of training include the Dental 
School and its affiliated hospitals, the John 
F. Kennedy Institute (an affiliate of The 
Johns Hopkins University) and the Mary- 
land School for the Blind. Each student is 
required to take a minimum of 30 hours of 
academic courses during his specialty edu- 
cation. These are offered by the Dental 
School and the other component Schools of 
the Health Sciences Center of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. Individual private 
operatories, a departmental library, semi- 
nar room and laboratory facilities are avail- 
able for the exclusive use of students. In 
addition, extensive training is provided in 
major facets of pediatrics, child psychiatry, 
pharmacology and otolaryngology in the 
Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy. As an 
educational medium, each student is re- 
quired to pursue and complete an original 
research project. 

PEDS 568. PEDIATRIC 

DENTISTRY SEMINARS 1-5 credits 

In lectures, seminars and laboratory exer- 
cises, students receive orientation to pediat- 
ric dentistry; discuss and evaluate the sig- 
nificance of literature on an assigned read- 
ing list; receive orientation to and instruc- 
tion in preventive, interceptive orthodontic 
treatment, and appliance therapy guiding 
the developing occlusion. Additional semi- 
nars focus on current developments in 
pediatric dentistry and related areas from a 
review of current literature. Guest lecturers 
and assigned topics are also utilized. 

PEDS 569. CLINICAL 

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 6 credits 

In the first year, the student renders pediat- 
ric dental care in the postdoctoral clinic 
under the supervision of an attending 
pediatric dentist. During the summer ses- 
sion and second year, the student is re- 
quired to treat children presenting complex 
and/or advanced dental health problems. 
The student perfects skills in diagnosis and 
treatment planning, restorative dentistry, 
behavioral and medical management, pre- 
ventive procedures and interceptive ortho- 
dontics. 



Advanced Education Programs 143 



PEDS 579. SPECIAL PROBLEMS 

IN PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 1-5 credits 

Each postdoctoral student will: 

— design, initiate and complete a limited 
research project 

— receive training and experience in provid- 
ing comprehensive dental rehabilitation 
in a hospital operating room to patients 
under general anesthesia 

— work at a special pediatric clinic such as 
cleft palate, cardiac, etc.; discuss results 
of dental examinations with the medical 
staff to determine optimum health for the 
child 

— spend six months in full-time attendance 
at the John F. Kennedy Institute for the 
Habilitation of the Mentally and Physi- 
cally Handicapped Child, assuming all 
clinical duties in the Dental Department. 

— teach, with supervision, pediatric den- 
tistry to undergraduates during the sec- 
ond year of training. 



PERIODONTICS 

The program in periodontics is designed 
to provide special knowledge and skills 
beyond the accepted D.D.S. or D.M.D. 
training so that, upon completion, students 
will be prepared to expertly perform all 
skills of the specialty. In addition to achiev- 
ing the highest level of proficiency and 
knowledge in periodontics, the student will 
be capable of producing new knowledge, 
capable of transmitting knowledge and 
sensitive to the oral health care needs of our 
population. 

In order to afford sufficient time to fulfill 
these objectives, the specialty program is 24 
months in duration. The first year of train- 
ing emphasizes the biomedical sciences as 
related to the specialty; the second year 
concentrates more specifically on the clini- 
cal phase of periodontics and the applica- 
tion of these biomedical concepts and prin- 
ciples. Students likewise gain experience in 
student teaching and clinical research. 

On successful completion of the pro- 
gram, students are awarded a certificate 
which qualifies him/her to practice and 



teach in the specialty of periodontics and to 
apply for the American Board of Perio- 
dontology. 

PERI 568. PERIODONTICS 

SEMINARS 1-7 credits 

Seminars, discussions and guest lecturers 
are utilized to develop student skills in 
diagnosis, prognosis and treatment plan- 
ning. Students become familiar with perio- 
dontal literature for purposes of critique, 
research methodology and content. Joint 
seminars are conducted to focus attention 
on the interrelationship of periodontics to 
all fields of dentistry. 

PERI 569. CLINICAL 

PERIODONTICS 3-6 credits 

Students develop skills which will permit 
them to become proficient in the treatment 
of all categories of patients with periodontal 
disease, including those with systemic re- 
lated problems. Students develop a 
rationale of treatment and gain experience 
in all current, therapeutically acceptable, 
periodontal modalities of patient care. 

PERI 579. SPECIAL PROBLEMS 
IN PERIODONTICS 1-7 credits 

Students gain experience in the formula- 
tion, development, institution, interpreta- 
tion, reporting and defense of a research 
investigation. They likewise acquire experi- 
ence in student teaching and effective 
communication and become proficient in 
the clinical recognition of pathological en- 
tities within the region of the oral cavity. 
Seminars are conducted to introduce stu- 
dents to practice management. 

PROSTHODONTICS 

The 24-month program in prostho- 
dontics is designed to provide the student 
with advanced education in the clinical 
practice of fixed and removable prostho- 
dontics based on sound biologic principles. 
A core of basic biologic science courses is 
presented in conjunction with clinical dis- 
ciplines directly related to the specialty of 
prosthodontics. Graduate course work in 
oral pathology, oral histology, micro- 
biology, biochemistry, pharmacology, and 
head and neck anatomy is correlated with 



44 / 'Advanced Education Programs 



special clinical programs in surgery, occlu- 
sion, periodontics, the temporomandibular 
joint and maxillo-facial prosthesis. The 
program meets the requirements for spe- 
cialty training of the American Board of 
Prosthodontics. 

REMV 568. PROSTHODONTIC 
SEMINARS 1-3 credits 

Prosthodontic seminars provide a forum for 
interchange and evaluation of information 
between students and faculty concerning 
clinical practices, clinical concepts and per- 
tinent scientific literature. Among the in- 
structional devices utilized are round-table 
discussions, case presentations, reports 
and critique of literature, preparation and 
presentation of literature abstracts, lecture 
and structured reading assignments. 

REMV 569. CLINICAL 

PROSTHODONTICS 6 credits 

The clinical prosthodontic program is de- 
signed to provide a comprehensive experi- 



ence in the divers phases of prosthodontics: 
fixed partial denture, removable partial 
denture, complete denture and cranio- 
facial prosthesis. The interdisciplinary re- 
quirements of prosthodontic treatment are 
emphasized. Opportunity is provided for a 
limited concentration of the student's time 
in an area of special interest; however, this 
concentration of time must be secondary to 
his mastery of the broad field of prostho- 
dontics. 

REMV 579. SPECIAL PROBLEMS 
IN PROSTHODONTICS 1-5 credits 

This section of the prosthodontic program 
consists of course work in subjects relevant 
to and supportive of clinical prosthodontic 
practice, research and teaching. These 
courses, in conjunction with a wide range of 
elective subjects, permit a student to struc- 
ture his postdoctoral program to serve his 
individual interests. A research project is 
required as part of a course in research 
methods. 




Advanced Education Programs 145 




CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Associate Dean for Continuing Education and 
Alumni Affairs: Dr. Charles T. Pridgeon 

Assistant Director of Continuing Education and 
Alumni Affairs: Dr. Robert W. Haroth 

The continuing education program at the 
Dental School is a formalized program that 
provides opportunities for the graduate to 
continue his education in order to maintain 
and improve his professional competency. 
The program consists of courses of one or 
more days' duration, on either a full-time or 
intermittent basis, covering all disciplines 
of dentistry. An average of fifty (50) courses 
are made available during each academic 
year. The objective is to provide the 
graduate with information and knowledge 
not only in the technical advancements in 
clinical practice, but also in the biologic, 
social and behavioral sciences related to 
practice. 

Clinical, laboratory and classroom spaces 
in the School have been specifically de- 
signed and provided for the continuing 
education program. Clinical participation, 
closed-circuit TV and other communication 



media are utilized, including the School's 
Independent Learning Center. In addition, 
the School's innovative self-instructional 
continuing education program has recently 
been made available to dentists and dental 
auxiliaries in outlying areas of the State by 
the establishment of satellite learning cen- 
ters in four community colleges. 

The continuing education courses are 
conducted by the School's faculty, visiting 
faculty and distinguished practitioners 
from all sections of the country. The pro- 
grams are conducted at the School and off- 
campus in several localities in Maryland 
and surrounding states. Dental auxiliaries 
may register for most courses and some 
courses are specifically programmed for the 
auxiliaries. Students are invited and en- 
couraged to attend continuing education 
courses on a space available basis and at no 
cost. Course contents and dates are listed 
on all student bulletin boards throughout 
the School. 

Twice yearly, continuing education 
course description brochures are mailed to 
25,000 dental practitioners in the south- 
eastern section of the United States. 



46IStudent Life 



STUDENT LIFE 




OFFICE OF 
STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Office of Student Affairs is either 
directly or indirectly involved with all as- 
pects of student life and welfare at the Den- 
tal School. Primary areas of responsibility 
include academic, personal and career 
counseling; financial aid; and advisory ser- 
vices. 

A major function of the Office of Student 
Affairs is the counseling and guidance of 
students to assist them in understanding 
and finding solutions to their academic dif- 
ficulties. Departmental academic counsel- 
ing and progress reporting are monitored 
and coordinated by the Office. Records 
concerning counseling, referrals and dis- 



position are maintained and serve as a re- 
source to the faculty and administration for 
purposes of academic evaluation and ad- 
vancement decisions. 

Students who experience financial, 
health, legal, employment, housing and 
other personal problems are counseled by 
the Director and referred as necessary to 
the appropriate campus agency or office. In 
addition, counseling concerning specialty 
training, military service, internships, den- 
tal education and dental research careers is 
available to undergraduate dental stu- 
dents. 

The Director of Student Affairs serves as 
advisor to all student organizations and 
publications; he also assists in the coordina- 
tion of joint student-faculty professional, 



Student Lifel47 



social and cultural programs, for which the 
Student Affairs Committee of the Faculty 
Council has the major responsibility. 

The Office of Student Affairs maintains 
direct liaison with administrators as well as 
campus, community and professional or- 
ganizations and agencies for the effective 
conduct of all student affairs. 

OFFICE OF 
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

The Office of Academic Affairs is the 
source of student information concerning 
the academic program and the repository 
for records of student academic perform- 
ance. 

Textbook lists, course schedules, exami- 
nation schedules and the academic calen- 
dar are disseminated through this Office. 
Program information distributed to stu- 
dents includes handouts concerning the 
grading system, course credits, guidelines 
for the selection of students for the clerk- 
ship and dental extern programs, and re- 
quirements for early graduation. This Of- 
fice is also the student's source of lecture 
schedules, course outlines, examinations 
and grades for the interdisciplinary Con- 
joint Sciences program. 

Official class rosters and student per- 
sonal data and address files are maintained 
by the Office of Academic Affairs, which 
serves as a liaison between the Dental 
School and the Director of Admissions and 
Registrations of the University for the coor- 
| dination of registration procedures. 

The Office is also responsible for coordi- 
nation of a computerized grading system 
which (a) provides each Advancement 
Committee with a composite report on all 
students in the class at the end of each 
quarter; (b) generates an individual quar- 
terly grade report to advise the student of 
his progress during the year; and (c) pro- 
vides a final grade report for the academic 
year to both the student and the Univer- 
sity's Office of Admissions and Regis- 
trations, which maintains the student's 



permanent record and issues the official 
transcript. 

The Office of Academic Affairs, which is 
under the direction of the Associate Dean 
for Academic Affairs, provides assistance 
to both students and faculty in matters re- 
lating to the academic program. 

STUDENT HONOR CODE 

The dental profession demands 
exemplary personal behavior from its prac- 
titioners, who enjoy a high degree of public 
confidence and trust. All students are ex- 
pected to abide by the provisions of the 
Student Honor Code and to demonstrate 
the highest standards of integrity at all 
times, in preparation for the obligations of 
the dental profession. 

A copy of the Student Honor Code is 
distributed to all students upon matricula- 
tion. 



HOUSING 

Increased enrollment at the University of 
Maryland professional schools has placed a 
strain on the limited on-campus facilities. 
Only single, full-time students are eligible 
to reside on campus. Priority is given to 
undergraduate professional students. As- 
signment to the residence halls is based on 
date of application, distance from home to 
the campus and availability of space. All 
assignments are made without regard for 
race, creed or national origin. Students are 
assigned spaces by random selection; re- 
quests for specific roommates WILL NOT 
be honored. The University reserves the 
right to make changes in room assignments 
deemed to be in the best interest of the 
students and/or the University. Resident 
accommodations, primarily double occu- 
pancy, are available in the Baltimore Stu- 
dent Union and Parsons Hall for Women. 
Board contracts are not available on the Bal- 
timore campus; meals may be purchased in 
the Baltimore Union or University Hospital 
cafeterias. 



4SIStudent Life 



Additional information and application 
forms may be obtained from the Director of 
Housing, 621 West Lombard Street, Balti- 
more, Maryland 21201. Off-campus hous- 
ing information is also available from the 
Director of Housing. 

STUDENT HEALTH 
SERVICE 

The School undertakes to provide medi- 
cal care for its students through the Student 
Health Service, located in Room 145, first 
floor of Howard Hall, 685 W. Baltimore 
Street. The office is staffed by a Director, 
Assistant Director, two full-time internists, 
a full-time psychiatrist, a full-time 
gynecologist and three registered nurses. 

BALTIMORE UNION 

The Baltimore Union, a five-story build- 
ing which contains a cafeteria, conference 
rooms, laundry facilities, game room and 
lounges, is located at 621 West Lombard 
Street. The Union is a center for social ac- 
tivities such as dances, receptions and 
movies, as well as special services for stu- 
dents of the professional schools. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Dental School and campus publications 
include the semi-annual Dental Newsletter, 
with articles concerning dental education at 
the School; The Maryland Probe, an informa- 
tive student publication which deals with 
topics and current issues of interest to den- 
tal students and faculty; Happenings, pub- 
lished bi-monthly, and Focus, published 
four times annually, to report events and 
news of interest to all UMAB campus fa- 
culty, staff and students. These publica- 
tions are distributed free of charge. 

In addition, a yearbook, The Mirror, is 
published annually by student editors and 
staff; and the Student Dental Association 
each year compiles and distributes a stu- 
dent directory. 



ORGANIZATIONS 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
STUDENT DENTAL ASSOCIATION 

The University of Maryland Student 
Dental Association is the organizational 
structure of the student body. It is presided 
over and governed by elected representa- 
tives from each class and is represented on 
appropriate committees of the Faculty 
Council. The organization participates in 
certain student-faculty activities and spon- 
sors and directs all student social activities. 
It is responsible for the publication of the 
School's yearbook, The Mirror. The 
UMSDA is unique among dental student 
organizations in having formulated its own 
constitution and code of ethics. 

THE AMERICAN STUDENT 
DENTAL ASSOCIATION 

This organization was established in Feb- 
ruary, 1971 with the aid of the ADA. Its 
primary purpose is to secure scholarships, 
loans and national reciprocity education for 
students and to assist in other student- 
related affairs. 

STUDENT NATIONAL 
DENTAL ASSOCIATION 

The Maryland Chapter of the Student 
National Dental Association was founded 
in 1973. The primary objective of this or- 
ganization is the fostering of admission, 
development and graduation of Black den- 
tal and dental hygiene students. Among 
the activities in which the Maryland Chap- 
ter is engaged are minority recruitment, 
tutoring, social and professional programs, 
and community and university relations. 

AMERICAN DENTAL 
HYGIENISTS' ASSOCIATION 

A student chapter of the American Den- 
tal Hygienists' Association has been estab- 
lished. Members are involved in activities 
such as scheduling guest speakers, fund 
raising projects and improving liaison with 
the local constituent association. Members 
of the Junior Association also participate in 
meetings and discussion groups on a re- 



Student Lifel49 



gional and national level. Representatives 
of the University of Maryland's Junior 
Association attend the annual meetings of 
the American Dental Hygienists' Asso- 
ciation and were recently awarded a Cer- 
tificate of Recognition by the Association 
for their leadership and participation. 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 
OF DENTAL SCHOOLS 

The Association's objective is to promote 
the advancement of dental education, re- 
search and service in all appropriately 
accredited institutions that offer programs 
for dental personnel. The Association has 
three membership categories: individual, 
student ($4.00) and honorary. Student 
members receive the Journal of Dental Educa- 
tion and the Dental Student News published 
by the Association. During the year the 
local chapter conducts programs to pro- 
mote the goals of this organization. One 
Dental School representative each from the 
dental, dental hygiene and postdoctoral 
student membership is elected to serve on 
the Council of Students of the American 
Association of Dental Schools. 

THE GORGAS ODONTOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was 
organized in 1916 as an honorary student 
dental society with scholarship as a basis 
for admission. The Society was named after 
Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in 
dental education, a teacher of many years' 
experience and a major contributor to den- 
tal literature. It was with the idea of per- 
petuating his name that the Society 
adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student 
must rank in the first 30 percent of his class. 
Speakers prominent in the dental and med- 
ical fields are invited to address members at 
monthly meetings. An effort is made to ob- 
tain speakers not connected with the Uni- 
versity. 

OMICRON KAPPA UPSILON 

Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, 
national honorary dental society, was char- 



tered at the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland during the 1928-1929 academic 
year. Students whose ranks for the entire 
course of study are among the highest 12% 
of the class are eligible. This high honor is 
conferred upon those seniors who, in addi- 
tion to scholarship, have demonstrated 
exemplary character traits and potential for 
future professional growth and attainment. 

THE AISENBERG RESEARCH SOCIETY 
The Aisenberg Research Society was 
founded in 1967 by dental students in- 
terested in sharing research ideas with 
prominent dental researchers and each 
other. The Society was named after the 
eminent investigator and former Dean of 
the University of Maryland Dental School, 
Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg. Scholarship and 
research experience are the main criteria for 
membership. The Society invites to mem- 
bership students of all classes who have 
participated in fellowships either at the 
Dental School or some other research in- 
stitution. 



GAMMA PI DELTA 

Chartered in 1965, Gamma Pi Delta is an 
honorary student dental organization with 
scholarship and interest in the field of 
prosthetic dentistry as a basis for admis- 
sion. The objective of the organization is 
the advancement of prosthetic dentistry 
through lectures, table clinics and other 
academic activities which will stimulate the 
creative interest of students and the profes- 
sion in general. 

PROFESSIONAL DENTAL 
FRATERNITIES 

The professional dental fraternity is a 
Greek letter organization of men bonded 
together by ritual. It is a specialized frater- 
nity which limits its membership to 
selected graduates and students, enrolled 
and satisfactorily pursuing courses in an 
accredited College of Dentistry. It is not an 
honorary fraternity or recognition society 



50IStudent Life 



which confers membership to recognize 
outstanding scholarship. 

Its aim is to promote the high ideals and 
standards of its profession, advance the 
professional knowledge and welfare of its 
members and provide a medium through 
which its members, with a common in- 
terest, can develop everlasting friendships. 

To do this, the professional dental frater- 
nity follows a pattern in the selection and 
training of its members that stresses the 
importance of high professional ethics and 
practices; fosters athletic and social func- 
tions that stimulate the development of 
life-long friendships; conducts an extensive 
program of speakers, tours, forums and re- 
search projects that are designed to 
broaden the professional knowledge of its 
members; and grants scholarships and 
awards that encourage professional profi- 
ciency and provide a service to its college 
and community. It complements the cur- 
riculum of the college and provides the cul- 
tural and social graces to round out the 
whole man. 

The following professional dental frater- 
nities constitute the American Dental 
Inter-fraternity Council and have over 140 
undergraduate chapters on campuses of 
the dental schools in this country: Alpha 
Omega, founded in 1907; Delta Sigma Del- 
ta, founded in 1882; Xi Psi Phi, founded in 
1889; and Psi Omega, founded in 1892. 
These fraternities have more than 150 active 
alumni chapters scattered throughout the 
world. Eighty-five percent of those active in 
the dental profession have fraternity affilia- 
tion. 

AWARDS 

Awards are presented to senior students 
at graduation to recognize the following 
achievements and qualities: 

DENTISTRY 

— highest scholastic average 
— grade point average among the ten 
highest in the class 



— highest average in Basic Dental Science 

— ethical standards, kindness and 
humanitarianism 

— professional demeanor 

— devotion to the School and the profes- 
sion 

— characteristics of an outstanding gen- 
eral practitioner 

— the most professional growth and de- 
velopment 

— conscientious and enthusiastic devo- 
tion to clinical practice 

— high proficiency in clinical care and pa- 
tient management 

— greatest proficiency in oral surgery 

— excellence in fixed partial prosthesis 

— excellence in complete oral operative 
restoration 

— excellence in practical set of full upper 
and lower dentures 

— outstanding senior thesis 

— achievement, proficiency and/or po- 
tential in each of the following spe- 
cialty areas: 
— anesthesiology 
— dentistry for children 
— dental radiology 
— endodontics 
— gold foil operation 
— operative dentistry research 
— oral medicine 
— oral pathology 
— orthodontics 
— periodontology 



DENTAL HYGIENE 

— highest scholastic average 

— grade point average among the five 
highest in the class 

— humanitarianism, ethical standards 
and devotion to the profession 

— interest in and potential for active par- 
ticipation in professional organizations 

— interest and participation in the Junior 
American Dental Hygienists' Associa- 
tion and the local Society 

— outstanding clinical performance 



Student Life 151 



— outstanding leadership and participa- 
tion in community activities and stu- 
dent and professional organizations 

EMPLOYMENT 
OPPORTUNITIES 
IN DENTISTRY 

The increased public demand for more 
and better oral health care creates an 
unprecedented climate for growth in the 
dental profession. 

Current dental graduates can anticipate 
initial annual net income on the average of 
$20,000 per annum. Current dental hygiene 
graduates can anticipate initial annual net 
income on the average of $12,000 per an- 
num. This income is contingent upon and 
can be affected by the area he/she serves, 
the practice specialty and the state of the 
economy at the time. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND 
LOAN FUNDS 

DENTAL STUDENTS 

Health Professions Student 
Scholarships 

The Comprehensive Health Manpower 
Training Act of 1971 extended coverage of 
the Federal Health Professions Scholarship 
Program. As a result, scholarship assist- 
ance is available to students who demon- 
strate an exceptional financial need. A 
scholarship is renewable after annual 
j reassessment of the student's financial 
position. 

State Grants 

In an attempt to meet the ever increasing 
needs of students, the State of Maryland 
Legislature each year allocates to the Uni- 
versity funds earmarked for student assist- 
ance. As a result, State Grants are available 
to disadvantaged students who demon- 
strate a financial need. Awards are made on 
an individual basis after careful review of 
the student's current financial situation. 



Health Professions Student Loans 

Under the Federal Health Professions 
Program, loans are made available to qual- 
ified students. Loans are reviewed on an 
annual basis and vary in amount depend- 
ing on the student's financial need. Stu- 
dents are not assessed interest premiums 
until they graduate and begin repayment. 
Repayments begin one year after gradua- 
tion and must be completed within ten 
years from that time. The current interest 
rate is 3 percent per annum. Borrowers who 
practice in an area where there is a shortage 
of dentists may annually cancel ten percent 
of the loan, up to a maximum of 50 percent. 
If the practice occurs in a designated low 
income district, cancellation at fifteen per- 
cent annually, up to 100 percent of the loan, 
is allowed. 

Bank Loans 

Through the Maryland Higher Education 
Loan Corporation and the United Student 
Aid Fund, loan programs which permit 
students to borrow money from their home 
town banks have been established. 
Graduate and professional students may 
borrow up to $1,500 per year to assist in 
meeting their educational expenses. Bor- 
rowers begin repayment ten months after 
graduation or withdrawal from school. At 
the present time, simple interest is charged 
at the rate of 7 percent. Further details may 
be secured from the Office of Student Aid. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational 
Endowment Fund 

Under a provision of the will of the late 
Dr. Edward S. Gaylord of New Haven, 
Connecticut, an amount approximating 
$16,000, the proceeds of which are to be 
devoted to aiding worthy students in secur- 
ing dental education, was left to the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation 

During World War II the Foundation rec- 
ognized the burden that the accelerated 



52IStudent Life 



course imposed upon many dental stu- 
dents who under normal circumstances 
would earn money for their education by 
employment during the summer vacation. 
The Foundation granted to this School a 
fund to provide rotating loans to deserving 
dental students. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund 

This fund was established in 1954 by the 
New Jersey Alumni Association in memory 
of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of 
the Class of 1910. The fund is a source of 
valuable help in aiding students to solve 
their temporary financial problems. 

The Student Dental Association- Alumni Fund 
This fund, created in 1960, was estab- 
lished for the purpose of aiding any student 
who may be in need of an emergency loan. 

American Fund for Dental Health 

The predecessor of the American Fund 
for Dental Health, the American Fund for 
Dental Education, was initially incorpo- 
rated in 1955 through the efforts of the 
American Dental Association. The change 
in name reflects a broadening of the original 
purpose of the Fund, which was to provide 
financial assistance for deserving students 
throughout the nation. Objectives of the 
AFDH include support for research, dental 
health and public education projects in ad- 
dition to financial assistance for dental 
schools and their students. Scholarship 
and loan funds for both dental and dental 
auxiliary students are available through 
AFDH. 

The International College of Dentists Student 
Loan Fund 

In 1962 the International College of Den- 
tists established a fund to assist deserving 
senior students in need of financial aid. 

United Student Aid Funds, Incorporated 

In 1963 this fund, which is supported by 
private enterprise and the University, was 
established. The fund provides assistance 
to sophomore, junior and senior students 



and utilizes the services of participating 
banking institutions. 

Gillette Hayden Memorial Foundation Student 
Loan Program 

This loan is available to promising 
women students in their junior, senior or 
graduate years of dental school. At this 
time the amount of each loan is not to ex- 
ceed $1,000.00, repayable one year and one 
month after the date of graduation at a per 
annum interest of 1%. There is no formal 
application form; requirements are a tran- 
script of the applicant's academic record, a 
letter of recommendation from the Dean, a 
character reference from a reputable person 
in the applicant's home town and the name 
and address of the nearest relative. All in- 
quiries should be addressed to the Gillette 
Hayden Memorial Foundation, Suite 204, 
33 Ponce de Leon Avenue, N.E., Atlanta, 
Georgia 30308. 

DENTAL HYGIENE STUDENTS 

Financial aid, in the form of scholarships, 
grants and loans, is awarded to students 
based upon apparent academic ability and 
financial need. Recipients of financial aid 
are expected to make satisfactory progress 
toward attainment of a degree and to abide 
by all academic and non-academic regula- 
tions of the University. In the case of new 
students, applicants must have been ac- 
cepted for admission to the University be- 
fore the financial aid application can be re- 
viewed. 

Requests for information about and ap- 
plications for financial aid for predental 
hygiene students should be addressed to 
the Student Aid Office at the campus to 
which the student is admitted. Dental 
hygiene students (junior and senior stand- 
ing) should write to the Student Aid Office, 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Mary- 
land 21201. 

Because each campus has its own filing 
deadline, applicants should contact the Fi- 
nancial Aid Office on the appropriate cam- 
pus early in the spring semester to obtain a 



Student Lifel53 



financial aid application and learn the filing 
deadline. Financial aid is awarded for only 
one academic year; a new application must 
be filed to apply for aid in a succeeding 
year. 

State Grants 

Dental hygiene students are eligible for 
State grants which are described on page 
51. 

National Direct Student Loans 

The University receives an annual Na- 
tional Direct Student Loan appropriation 
from the federal government that is used as 
part of the School's loan fund. National 
Direct Student Loan allocations are based 
on the same considerations as other finan- 
cial aid awards. Repayment of a NDSL be- 
gins one year after the borrower ceases to 
be a full-time student. The loan is repaid at 
a minimum rate of $45.00 per quarter and 
repayment must be completed within ten 
years. No interest is charged on the loan 
until the student graduates. After that date, 
interest accrues at the rate of 3% per an- 
num. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 
Under provisions established by the fed- 
eral government, limited grants are avail- 
able to encourage students of exceptional 
financial need to continue their post- 
secondary school education. A recipient 
must be a United States citizen enrolled as a 
full-time undergraduate. Applications are 
available at most undergraduate financial 
aid offices. 



Bank Loans 

Most states have established federally 
guaranteed loan programs which permit 
students to borrow money from their home 
town banks. In most states undergraduates 
in good standing may borrow up to $1,500 
per year to assist in meeting their educa- 
tional expenses. Borrowers begin repay- 
ment ten months after graduation or with- 
drawal from school. At the present time, 
simple interest is charged at the rate of 7%. 
Further details concerning the Maryland 



program or programs in other states may be 
secured from the Student Aid Office or a 
local bank. 

General State Tuition Scholarships 

The General Assembly of Maryland pro- 
vides a number of limited tuition scholar- 
ships to students entering college for the 
first time. The scholarships may be used in 
any approved institution of higher educa- 
tion within the State. At the University of 
Maryland, they cover the items listed as 
fixed charges. Awards are made by the 
State Scholarship Board based upon finan- 
cial need and the results of a competitive 
examination, usually given during the 
month of November. For additional infor- 
mation and applications contact high 
school guidance counselors or the Mary- 
land State Scholarship Board, 2100 Guil- 
ford Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21218. 

General Assembly Grants 

These grants are awarded by members of 
the State Legislature to persons living in the 
legislative district represented by the Dele- 
gate or Senator. 

American Dental Hygienists' Association 
Scholarship and Loan Program 

The American Dental Hygienists' As- 
sociation administers two scholarship pro- 
grams: the Certificate Scholarship Program 
for students entering the final year of a den- 
tal hygiene curriculum and the Post Dental 
Hygiene Scholarship Program for certifi- 
cate dental hygienists who will be enrolled 
in a program leading to a baccalaureate de- 
gree. Dental hygiene students enrolled or 
accepted for full-time enrollment may also 
be considered for American Dental 
Hygienists' Association Loans which range 
from $500 to $1,000 annually. Repayment 
begins ten months after graduation with 
7.5% interest on the amount of the loan 
outstanding. For further information about 
these scholarships, contact the Department 
of Dental Hygiene or write directly to The 
American Dental Hygienists' Association, 
211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 
60611. 



54 1 Administration and Faculty 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHAIRMAN 

Mr. B. Herbert Brown 

4401 Roland Avenue, A-607 
Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

VICE CHAIRMAN 

Mr. Hugh A. McMullen 

Geppert and McMullen, 21 Prospect Square 
Cumberland, Maryland 21502 

SECRETARY 

Dr. Samuel H. Hoover 

507 Chadwick Road 
Timonium, Maryland 21093 

TREASURER 

Mr. L. Mercer Smith 
5113 Falls Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 
Mr. William G. Connelly 

1912 Saratoga Drive 
Adelphia, Maryland 20783 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Mr. N. Thomas Whittington, Jr. 

Whittington Poultry Farms, Inc. 
Marion Station, Maryland 21838 

Mrs. Mary H. Broadwater 

606 Orchard Road 
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740 

The Honorable Young D. Hance 

Secretary of Agriculture 
State Department of Agriculture 
Parole Plaza Office Building 
Annapolis, Maryland 21401 

Mr. Edward V. Hurley 

c/o Board of Regents' Office 
Bressler Research Building 
29 South Green Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

3505 Fallstaff Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21215 

Mr. Peter F. O'Malley 

Shipley, O'Malley & Miles 

9827 Central Avenue 

Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20870 

Miss Judith S. Sachwald 

1304 Sudvale Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21208 



Mr. John C. Scarbath 

Pine Grove Road, Route #1 
Rising Sun, Maryland 21911 



TYDINGS 
Quint & Gordon 



The Honorable Joseph D 

Danzansky, Dickey, Tydings 
Suite 1010, Bender Building 
1120 Connecticut Avenue, Northwest 
Washington, D. C. 20036 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 

PRESIDENT 

WILSON H. ELKINS— B.A., University of Texas, 1932; 

M.A., 1932; B. Litt., Oxford University, 1936; D. Phil., 

1936. 



VICE PRESIDENT FOR 
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 
R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., 

Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., 
1936; Ph.D., 1942. 



California State College, 
Ohio State University, 



VICE PRESIDENT FOR 
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 
DONALD W. O'CONNELL — B.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GRADUATE 
STUDIES AND RESEARCH 

MICHAEL J. PELCZARjR.— B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., State University of 
Iowa, 1941. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS 
AND LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS 
FRANK L. BENTZ, Jr. — B.S., University of Maryland, 
1942; Ph.D., 1952. 



OFFICERS OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
AT BALTIMORE 

THE PRESIDENT OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

WILSON H. ELKINS— B. A., University of Texas, 1932; 

M.A., 1932; B. Litt., Oxford University, 1936; D. Phil., 

1936. 

CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 

ALBIN O. KUHN — B.S., University of Maryland, 
1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 



Administration and Faculty 155 



PRINCIPAL 
ACADEMIC OFFICERS 



DEAN, DENTAL SCHOOL 

ERROL L. REESE — B.S., Fairmont State College, 
1960; D.D.S., West Virginia University, 1963; M.S., 
University of Detroit, 1968. 

ACTING DEAN, GRADUATE STUDIES 
AND RESEARCH 

WILLIAM J. KlNNARD, JR. — B.S., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Purdue Univer- 
sity, 1957. 

DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW 

MICHAEL J. KELLY — B.A., Princeton University, 
1959; Ph.D., Cambridge University, 1964; LL.B., Yale 
University, 1967. 

DEAN, SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

JOHN M. DENNIS — B.S., University of Maryland, 

1943; M.D., 1945. 

DEAN, SCHOOL OF NURSING 
MARION I. MURPHY — B.S., University of Minne- 
sota, 1936; M.P.H. 
Ph.D., 1959. 



University of Michigan, 1946; 



DEAN, SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
WILLIAM J. KlNNARD, Jr. — B.S., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Purdue Univer- 
sity, 1957. 



DEAN, SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 
AND COMMUNITY PLANNING 

Queens College, 1948; 



Daniel Thursz — b.a. 

M.S.W., Catholic University, 1955; D.S.W. 



1959. 



DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND HOSPITAL 

G. BRUCE McFADDEN — B.S., Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute, 1957; M.H.A., Medical College of Virginia, 

1961. 



OFFICERS FOR CENTRAL AND 
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
AT BALTIMORE 

ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR 

W. JACKSON STENGER — B.A., Washington College, 

1949; M.A., Georgetown University, 1959; Ph.D., 

1965. 

ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR 
ROY BOROM — B.A., Wooster College, 1949; 
M.S.S.A., Western Reserve School of Applied Social 
Sciences, 1951. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

AND REGISTRATIONS 

WAYNE A. SMITH — B.S., University of Maryland, 

1962. 

DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS SERVICES 

ROBERT C. BROWN — B.A., University of Maryland, 

1963. 

ACTING DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR 

EDUCATIONAL COMPUTING DEVELOPMENT 

LINDA S. BRADLEY — B.A., Goucher College, 1969. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL SERVICES 

RONALD J. BARIL — B.S., Bridgewater State College, 

1965. 

DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL PLANT 
ROBERT L. WALTON — B.S., University of Maryland, 
1938. 

DIRECTOR, STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 
WILFRED H. TOWNSHEND — B.A., The Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1936; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1940. 

DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

WALTER T. BROWN — B.S., University of Maryland, 

1964; M.Ed., American University, 1971. 

LIBRARIAN AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

HILDA E. MOORE — B.A., Randolph-Macon Wom- 
en's College, 1936; B.S., Emory University Library 
School, 1937. 



56 1 'Administration and Faculty 




Dental Faculty Late 1800's 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
OF THE DENTAL SCHOOL 



ERROL L. REESE, Dean 

B.S., Fairmont State College, 1960; D.D.S., West 
Virginia University, 1963; M.S., University of De- 
troit, 1968. 



MORELAND, Associate Dean for Academic 



Ernest F. 
Affairs 

B.S., University of Georgia, 1960; M.A., Western 
Carolina University, 1962; Ed. D., Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1967. 

JOHN F. HASLER, Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs 
B.S., Indiana University, 1958; D.D.S., 1962; 
M.S.D., 1969. 

CHARLES T. PridGEON, Associate Dean for Continuing 
Education and Alumni Affairs 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 

DONALD E. SHAY, Assistant Dean for Biological Sciences 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1938; Ph.D., 1943. 

CHARLES B. LEONARD, Jr., Director of Admissions 
B.A., Rutgers College of South Jersey, 1955; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1957; Ph.D., 1964. 

MARK L. WAGNER, Director of Student Affairs 

A.B., Birmingham Southern College, 1959; D.M.D., 
University of Alabama, 1963. 

WILBUR O. RAMSEY, Director of Advanced Specialty 
Education and Special Clinical Programs 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 



THE FACULTY 

FACULTY EMERITI 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., Dean Emeritus 
J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., D.Sc, Dean Emeritus 
Joseph C. Biddix, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
Edward C. Dobbs, D.D.S., B.S., Professor Emeritus 
BriceM. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
Gardner P. H. Foley, A.M., A.B. Professor Emeritus 
Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
L. Edward Warner, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
George McLean, M.D., Associate Professor Emeritus 
Ida M. Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S., Librarian Emeritus 

PROFESSORS 

Sue-ning C. Barry, Professor of Anatomy 

B.A. Barat College, 1955; Ph.D., University of Mary- ' 

land, 1961. 
John J. Bergquist, Professor of Periodontics 

D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1954; M.S., 1970. 
Gerald M. Bowers, Professor of Periodontics 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1950; D.D.S., 1954; 

M.S., Ohio State University, 1962. 
Raymond M. Burgison, Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., Loyola College, 1945; M.S., University of 

Maryland, 1948; Ph.D., 1950; M.L.A., The Johns 

Hopkins University, 1968. 
Joseph P. Cappuccio, Clinical Professor of Oral Surgery 

B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1943; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1946. 
Donald J. Forrester, Professor of Pediatric Dentistry 

D.D.S., Western Reserve University, 1960; M.S.D., 

University of Washington, 1964. 
Russell Gigliotti, Professor of Basic Dental Science 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1945. 
James H. Greeley, Professor of Fixed Restorative Dentistry 

D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1959; M.S.D., 

Indiana University, 1966. 



Administration and Faculty 157 



John M. Grewe, Professor of Orthodontics 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1960; D.D.S., 1962; 

M.S.D., 1964; Ph.D., 1966. 
Lawrence F. Halpert, Clinical Professor of Periodontics 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1958; D.D.S., 

University of Maryland, 1962. 
McDonald K. Hamilton. Professor of Oral Surgery 

A.B., Alma College, 1952; D.D.S., University of 

Michigan, 1956. 
John F. Hasler, Professor of Oral Diagnosis 

B.S., Indiana University, 1958; D.D.S., 1962; 

M.S.D., 1969. 
Frank C. Jerbi, Professor of Removable Prosthodontics 

D.D.S., Loyola University (Chicago), 1939. 
Yoon Soo Kim (Visiting), Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., Seoul National University, 1953; M.D., Yonsei 

University College of Medicine, 1957; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, 1967. 
John P. Lambooy, Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A., Kalamazoo College, 1937; M.S., 1938; M.A., 

University of Illinois, 1939; Ph.D., University of 

Rochester, 1942. 
Martin Lunin, Professor of Oral Pathology 

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1938; D.D.S., 

Washington University, 1950; M.P.H., Columbia 

University, 1952. 
George W. Piavis, Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1948; M. Ed., 

1952; Ph.D., Duke University, 1958. 
Charles T. Pridgeon, Professor of Periodontics 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 
D. Vincent Provenza, Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; 

Ph.D., 1952. 

Wilbur O. Ramsey, Professor of Removable Prosthodontics 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Frieda G. Rudo, Professor of Pharmacology 

A.B., Goucher College, 1944; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1960; Ph.D., 1963. 

Donald E. Shay, Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1938; Ph.D., 1943. 

John I. White, Professor of Physiology 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1939; Ph.D., Rutgers 
University, 1950. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

David S. August, Associate Clinical Professor of Endodon- 
tics 

D.D.S., Temple University, 1964. 
Sophia A. Balis, Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatric 

Dentistry 

D.D.S., University of Athens (Greece) 1957; D.D.S., 

University of Toronto, 1966. 
Todd Beckerman, Associate Professor of Oral Pathology 

B.A., Emory University, 1959; D.D.S., Columbia 

University, 1963. 
Jordan S. Bloom, Associate Clinical Professor of Oral 

Pathology 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1949; D.D.S., 

University of Maryland, 1953. 



I. Norton Brotman, Associate Clinical Professor of Oral 
Pathology 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1936. 

George F. Buchness, Associate Professor of Fixed Re- 
storative Dentistry 

B.S., Loyola College, 1948; M.S., Catholic Univer- 
sity of America, 1954; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1961. 

Yung-Feng Chang, Associate Professor of Microbiology 
B.S., National Taiwan University, 1958; M.S., 1960; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1966. 

Suresh C. Choudhary, Associate Professor of Removable 
Prosthodontics 

F.Sc, G. M. Memorial College (India), 1951; B.D.S., 
Sir C.E.M. Dental College (India), 1955; M.S., Mar- 
quette University, 1963; D.D.S., 1967. 

Duane T. DeVore, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery 
D.D.S., Loyola University (Chicago), 1956; Ph.D., 
University of London, 1975. 

Jose H. Diaz, Associate Professor of Fixed Restorative Den- 
tistry 

B.S., University of Puerto Rico, 1941; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1950. 

Frank A. Dolle, Associate Clinical Professor of Phar- 
macology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 1950; 
Ph.D., 1954; D.D.S., 1959. 

Stanley H. Dosh, Associate Professor of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 

Pat Fetchero, Associate Professor of Removable Pros- 
thodontics 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1949; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1952. 

Leslie P. Gartner, Associate Professor of Anatomy 
B. A., Neward College of Arts and Sciences, Rutgers 
University, 1965; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 1970. 

Marvin M. Graham, Associate Clinical Professor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry 

A.B., Cornell University, 1938; A.M., 1939; D.D.S., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1943. 

Robert W. Haroth, Associate Professor of Fixed Restora- 
tive Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1958; M. Ed., 1972. 

James L. Hiatt, Associate Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., Ball State University, 1959; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 
1972. 

Matthew Kessler, Associate Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 

B.S., Brooklyn College, 1956; D.D.S., New York 
City College of Dentistry, 1960. 

George W. Kidder, III, Associate Professor of Physiology 
A.B., Amherst College, 1956; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1961. 

Francis J. Kihn, Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatric 
Dentistry 

B.S., Loyola College, 1952; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1956. 

William Kress, Associate Clinical Professor of Orthodon- 
tics 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1936. 



58 1 Administration and Faculty 



George N. Krywolap, Associate Professor of Microbiology 
B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1960; M.S., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

George A. Lentz, Jr., Associate Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1953; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1957. 

Ch arles B. Leonard, Jr., Associate Professor of Biochemis- 
try 

B.A., Rutgers College of South Jersey, 1955; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1957; Ph.D., 1964. 

Robert J. Leupold, Associate Professor of Removable Pros- 
thodontics 

D.M.D., Tufts University, 1949; M. Ed., George 
Washington University, 1975. 

Bernard A. Levy, Associate Professor of Oral Pathology 
A.B., Ohio University, 1963; D.D.S., Western Re- 
serve, 1966; M.S.D., Indiana University, 1969. 

Odd P. Lind, Associate Professor of Oral Health Care De- 
livery 

LL.M., University of Copenhagen, 1962; M.P.H., 
University of California, 1968; D.D.S., Royal Dental 
College, Copenhagen (Denmark), 1951. 

Ephraim T. Lisansky, Associate Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1933; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1937. 

Peter McLean-Lu, Associate Professor of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1934. 

ErnestF. Moreland, Associate Professor of Dental Educa- 
tion 

B.S., University of Georgia, 1960; M.A., Western 
Carolina University, 1962; Ed.D., Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1967. 

Donald L. Olson, Associate Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
D.D.S., Columbia University, 1957. 

David G. Owen, Associate Professor of Pediatric Dentistry 
A.B., Syracuse University, 1960; D.D.S., McGill 
University, 1964; A.M., University of Chicago, 1970. 

Jon K. Park, Associate Professor of Oral Diagnosis 

D.D.S., University of Missouri, 1964; B.A., Wichita 
State University, 1969; M.S., University of Missouri, 
1971. 

David N. Plessett, Associate Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1949; D.D.S., 
Temple University, 1954. 

Errol L. Reese, Associate Professor of Removable Pros- 
thodontics 

B.S., Fairmont State College, 1960; D.D.S., West 
Virginia University, 1963; M.S., University of De- 
troit, 1968. 
Marion S. Ratliff, Associate Professor of Periodontics 

B.A., University of Iowa, 1960; D.D.S., 1966. 
Maurice S. Rodgers, Associate Professor of Removable 
Prosthodontics 

D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1938. 
Morris Roseman, Associate Professor of Oral Health Care 
Delivery 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; M.A., 1943; 
Ph.D., Duke University, 1949. 



Howard E. Schunick, Associate Clinical Professor of En- 
dodontics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., 1962. 

Preston G . Shelton, Associate Professor of Pediatric Den- 
tistry 

B.S., John Carroll University, 1963; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1967; M.S., University of Neb- 
raska, 1971. 

Rodger F. Sisca, Associate Professor of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1955; D.D.S., 1962; 
M.S., 1963; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1967. 

Theodore S. Sobkov, Associate Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1958; D.D.S., 1962. 

Glenn D. Steele, Associate Professor of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1942. 

James R. Swancar, Associate Professor of Oral Pathology 
B.A., Western Reserve University, 1952; D.D.S., 
1956; M.S., 1963. 

D. Robert Swinehart, Associate Clinical Professor of Or- 
thodontics 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1933; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1937. 

Robert J. Sydiskis, Associate Professor of Microbiology 
B.A., University of Bridgeport, 1961; Ph.D., North- 
western University, 1965. 

Paul D. Thut, Associate Professor of Pharmacology 
A.B., Hamilton College, 1965; M.S., University of 
Rhode Island, 1968; Ph.D., Dartmouth Medical 
School, 1971. 

Donald M. Tilghman, Associate Professor of Oral 
Surgery 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; D.D.S., 1961. 

Edmond G. Vanden Bosche, Associate Professor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1943; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1947. 

Mark L. Wagner, Associate Professor of Pediatric Den- 
tistry 

A.B., Birmingham Southern College, 1959; D.M.D., 
University of Alabama, 1963. 

Robert M. Zupnik, Associate Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1958; M.S.D., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1964. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

George C. Abraham, Assistant Professor of Fixed Restora- 
tive Dentistry 

I.Sc, Nowrasjee Wadia College (India), 1958; 
B.D.S., Nair Hospital Dental College (Bombay Uni- 
versity), 1964; M.S., Loma Linda University, 1967. 

Harry Aks, Assistant Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1937. 

Stanley S. Andrews, Assistant Clinical Professor of En- 
dodontics 

B.S., St. John's University, 1965; M.S.D., University 
of Washington, 1971. 



Administration and Faculty 159 



Ramzi C. Anton, Assistant Professor of Endodontics 
B.D.S., University of Baghdad, 1958; M.S.D., Uni- 
versity of Detroit, 1965;D.D.S., Howard University, 
1971. 

Nasir Bashirelahi. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 
B.S., Tehran University, 1960; Pharm. D., 1962; 
M.S., University of Louisville, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 

Robert B. Bennett. Assistant Professor of Physiology 
B.A., Carleton College, 1960; M.S., University of 
Nebraska, 1963; Ph.D., 1967. 

Kathy B. Benveniste, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 
B.A., Goucher College, 1966; M. Ph.,' Yale Univer- 
sity, 1968; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1971. 

Marvin Berger, Assistant Clinical Professor of Periodon- 
tics 

B.A., Tulane University, 1965; D.D.S., Columbia 
University, 1969. 

Stewart A. Bergman, Assistant Professor of Oral Surgery 
B.A., Brooklyn College, 1964; D.D.S., State Univer- 
sity of New York, 1968. 

Robert J. Berkowitz, Assistant Professor of Pediatric Den- 
tistry 

A.B., Clark University, 1967; D.D.S., State Univer- 
sity of New York, 1972. 

K. Evans Bethea, Assistant Clinical Professor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry 

B.S., Morgan State College, 1961; D.D.S., Meharry 
Medical College, 1968. 

Paul D. Biederman, Assistant Professor of Pediatric Den- 
tistry 

B.S., City College of New York, 1966; D.D.S., State 
University of New York, 1970. 

Arthur J. Bonito, Assistant Research Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1965; M.S., Purdue 
University, 1967; Ph.D., 1975. 

Ronald S. Branoff, Assistant Clinical Professor of Or- 
thodontics 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966; M.S.D., 
Fairleigh-Dickinson University, 1970. 

Morris Burke, Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B . Sc. , University of Sydney, 1960; M. Sc. , University 
of South Wales, 1963; Ph.D., 1966. 

Robert S. Burke, Assistant Clinical Professor of Endodon- 
tics 

D.D.S., Loyola University, 1965; M.S., George 
Washington University, 1972. 

Donald G. Burks, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 
D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1967. 

Barbara A. Byrd, Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
B.S., Old Dominion, 1973; M.S., 1975. 

Seth B. Canion, Assistant Professor of Pediatric Dentistry 
B.S., Howard University, 1969; D.D.S., Harvard 
University, 1973. 

John Carr, Assistant Professor of Fixed Restorative Den- 
tistry 

B.S., Howard University, 1948; D.D.S., Meharry 
Medical College, 1953. 



William E. Chmar, Assistant Professor of Periodontics 
B.S., Loyola College, 1965; D.D.S., Georgetown 
University, 1969. 

Peter J. Coccaro, Jr., Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
B.S., University of Alabama, 1964; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1968; M.S., 1974. 

Simon A. Courtade, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 
B.A., Wesleyan University, 1949; M.A., University 
of Michigan, 1952; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 
1965. 

James F. Craig, Assistant Professor of Dental Education 
B.S., Western Illinois University, 1968; M.S., In- 
diana University, 1970; Ed.D., 1972. 

Harold L. Crossley, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 
B.S., University of Rhode Island, 1964; M.S., 1969; 
Ph.D., 1972. 

Thomas Daley, Assistant Professor of Periodontics 
B.S., Case Western Reserve University, 1969; 
D.D.S., 1971; M.S., 1973. 

Victor Davis, Assistant Clinical Professor of Periodontics 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1970. 

Allan L. Delisle, Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
B.S., University of California, 1960; M.S., 1961; 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1968. 

George E. Dent, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

B.S., Georgetown University, 1961; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1965. 

Rajendra J. DeSai, Assistant Professor of Removable Pros- 
thodontics 

B.D.S., Nair Dental College (India), i96i ; D.D.S., 
Howard University, 1971. 

Charles J. Donnelly, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1942; D.D.S., 1945; 
M.P.H., 1948. 

John R. Dopson, Assistant Professor of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1963. 

Alex Drabkowski, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

B.A., Wayne State University, 1951; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Detroit, 1955; M.P.H., University of 
Michigan, 1967. 

Gwendolyn F. Dunn, Assistant Clinical Professor of Or- 
thodontics 

B.A., Dillard University, 1964; D.D.S., Meharry 
Medical College, 1970; M.S., State University of 
New York, 1972. 

JoAnne L. Fahey, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

R.D.H., Temple University, 1968; B.S., University 
of North Carolina, 1970; M.P.H., 1971. 

William A. Falkler, Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
B.A., Western Maryland College, 1966; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1969; Ph.D., 1971. 

William B. Finnagin, Assistant Clinical Professor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1959; D.D.S., 1963. 



60 1 'Administration and Faculty 



A. Patrick Flynn, Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatric 
Dentistry 

A.B., College of the Holy Cross, 1968; D.M.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1972. 

Lawrence A. Fox, Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatric 
Dentistry 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1960; D.D.S., 1964. 

Raymond S. Garrison, Assistant Professor of Oral Diag- 
nosis 

B.S., Davidson College, 1967; D.D.S., University of 
North Carolina, 1971. 

Edward M. Goldman, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Orthodontics 
D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1967. 

Stephen A. Goldman, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1965; D.D.S., 1968. 

John J. Golski, Assistant Clinical Professor of Periodontics 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 

Michael J. Goode, Assistant Clinical Professor of Endo- 
dontics 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., 1965. 

Allan J. Goodfriend, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Endodontics 

B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1964; D.D.S., 
1969. 

Robert Goren, Assistant Clinical Professor of Endodontics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1952; D.D.S., 1958. 

Constance B. Greeley, Assistant Professor of Pediatric 
Dentistry 
B.S., Temple University, 1968; D.D.S., 1972. 

Joel E. Grotstein, Assistant Professor of Endodontics 
D.D.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1961. 

Edward L. Halpern, Assistant Clinical Professor of Perio- 
dontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., 1967; 
M.S.D., Georgetown University, 1971. 

Arthur L. Hayden, Assistant Professor of Oral Health 
Care Delivery 
D.M.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1945. 

Susan E. Hayduk, Assistant Professor of Periodontics 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1966; D.M.D., 1969. 

Richard B. Hayes, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

B.S., Manhattan College, 1967; D.D.S., Columbia 
University, 1971. 

Donald J. Hobart, Assistant Professor of Anatomy 
B.S., Western Maryland College, 1962; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1967; Ph.D., 1972. 

Alvan M. Holston, Jr., Assistant Professor of Fixed Re- 
storative Dentistry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., 1967. 

Lireka P. Joseph, Assistant Professor of Oral Health Care 
Delivery 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1964; M.P.H., 1967; 
Dr.P.H., 1973. 

J. Mehsen Joseph, Assistant Clinical Professor of Mi- 
crobiology 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1948; M.S., 1949; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1951; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Toledo, 1955. 



Barry L. Jurist, Assistant Clinical Professor of Endo- 
dontics 

B. A., Queens College of the City University of New 
York, 1965; D.D.S., New York University, 1969. 

Stanley H. Klein, Assistant Clinical Professor of Endo- 
dontics 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1963; D.D.S., 1966. 

Christina M. Koch, Assistant Professor of Dental 
Hygiene 

B.S., University of Detroit, 1969; M.A., George 
Washington University, 1971. 

Barry S. Lever, Assistant Clinical Professor of Perio- 
dontics 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954; D.D.S., 1958. 

Elka Levin, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
B.S., National College (Argentina), 1947; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1971. 

L. Stephan Levin, Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatric 
Dentistry 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1960; D.D.S., 
1964; M.S.D., Indiana University, 1971. 

Gus J. Livaditis, Assistant Professor of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 
D.D.S., Temple University, 1970. 

Herbert Livingston, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1968. 

Dean McKinnon, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Diagnosis 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.S., Ohio 
State University, 1952; D.D.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1956. 

Philip S. Markin, Assistant Clinical Professor of Ortho- 
dontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1963; D.D.S., 1966; 
M.S., Loyola University (Chicago), 1972. 

Frank W. Mastrola, Jr., Assistant Professor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry 

B.A., Providence College, 1956; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1960. 

John H. Mattocks, Assistant Clinical Professor of Endo- 
dontics 

B.S., Livingston College, 1964; D.D.S., Howard 
University, 1972. 

Richard M. Meszler, Assistant Professor of Anatomy 
A.B., New York University College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, 1964; Ph.D., University of Louisville, 1969. 

William J. Mislowsky, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 

B.S., Loyola College, 1963; D.D.S., Georgetown 
University, 1967; M.S., 1969. 

Warren M. Morganstein, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 1969; 
M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 1975. 

Martin M. Morris, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 
B.S., Rutgers University, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1965. 



Administration and Faculty 161 



Robert E. Morris, Assistant Professor of Oral Health Care 
Delivery 

A.B., College of Holy Cross, 1965; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1969. 

Kenneth E. Mort, Assistant Clinical Professor of Remov- 
able Prosthodontics 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1967; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Missouri, 1970. 

Norbert R. Myslinski, Assistant Professor of Pharmacol- 
ogy 
B.S., Canisius College, 1969; Ph.D., University of 

Illinois, 1973. 

Birget E. Nardell, Assistant Professor of Physiology 
B.S., University of Illinois, 1961; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1964; Ph.D., 1969. 

Robert K. Nauman, Assistant Professor of Microbiology 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1963; M.S., 
University of Massachusetts, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 

Lawrence Nurin, Assistant Clinical Professor of Perio- 
dontics 

B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson, 1964; D.D.S., Howard 
University, 1968. 

C. Daniel Overholser, Assistant Professor of Oral Diag- 
nosis 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1966; D.D.S., In- 
diana University, 1970; M.S.D., 1972. 

Charles T. Pavlick, Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Orthodontics 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1961; D.D.S., 1961; 
M.S., University of Illinois, 1966. 

JoAnne I. Pepin, Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
B.S., University of Michigan, 1962; M.P.H., 1969. 

Edward P. Quarantillo, Assistant Professor of Remov- 
able Prosthodontics 
D.D.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1938. 

Leonard Rapoport, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; D.D.S., 1947. 

Norman C. Rutter, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

B.S., College of William and Mary, 1953; D.D.S., 
Medical College of Virginia, 1959; M.P.H., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1964. 

Myron H. Sachs, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 
D.D.S., Columbia University, 1939. 

Rajendar M. Saini, Assistant Clinical Professor of Ortho- 
dontics 

F. Sc, Punjab University College (India), 1958; 
B.D.S., Government Dental College (India), 1962; 
M.S.D., New York University, 1966; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Toronto, 1970. 

Pertti O. Sainio, Assistant Professor of Oral Pathology 
D.D.S., University of Helsinski, 1958. 

Judy A. Schoettle, Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
B.S., University of Detroit, 1970; M.S., University of 
Kentucky, 1974. 

Ronald J. Scornavacca, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Orthodontics 

B.S., Villanova University, 1964; D.M.D., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1968. 



Werner Seibel, Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1965; M.A., Hofstra Uni- 
versity, 1968; Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth Uni- 
versity, 1972. 

Eli M. Shulman, Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 
A.B., Ohio State University, 1942; D.D.S., 1947. 

Barry A. Sklar, Assistant Clinical Professor of Perio- 
dontics 

B.S., Temple University, 1963; D.D.S., Howard 
University, 1971. 

Thomas L. Snyder, Assistant Professor of Oral Health 
Care Delivery 

B.S., St. Joseph's College, 1967; D.M.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1971; M.B.A., 1974. 

Rosalynde K. Soble, Assistant Professor of Oral Health 
Care Delivery 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1944; M.S.W., 1965. 

Roger J. Spott Assistant Clinical Professor of Endodontics 
B.S., Western Reserve University, 1966; D.D.S., 
1968. 

Arthur Stein, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
D.D.S., Temple University, 1970. 

Michael P. Stiglitz, Assistant Clinical Professor of Perio- 
dontics 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1965; D.D.S. Temple 
University, 1968. 

Richard N. Tennenbaum, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Surgery 

A.B., Hunter College, 1966; D.M.D., Tufts Univer- 
sity, 1970. 

Van P. Thompson, Assistant Professor of Basic Dental 
Science 

B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1966; Ph.D., 
1971. 

Norman Tinanotf. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediat- 
ric Dentistry 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1967; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1971; M.S., University of Iowa, 1973. 

Thomas A. Tucker, Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 
B.A., Rutgers University, 1967; D.D.S., Temple 
University, 1971; M.S.D., University of 
Washington, 1975. 

JackD. Vakdermer, Assistant Professor of Oral Diagnosis 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1963, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1967. 

Philip C. Wagley, Assistant Professor of Removable 
Prosthodontics 
D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1943. 

James B. Ward, Assistant Clinical Professor of Removable 
Prosthodontics 

B.S., Howard University, 1961; M.S., 1966; D.D.S., 
1972. 

Harvey Webb, Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

B.S., Howard University, 1961; M.S., 1966; D.D.S., 
1972. 

Jerome J. Weinstein, Assistant Clinical Professor of Pedi- 
atric Dentistry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; D.D.S., 1962. 



62 / Administration and Faculty 




George H. Williams III, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry 

B.S., Tusculum College, 1962; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1966. 

Gerald D. Williams, Assistant Research Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery 

A. A., College of General Education, 1956; B.S., 
Mansfield State College, 1960; M.Ed., Pennsylvania 
State University, 1963; Ed.D., 1971. 

Dennis E. Winson, Assistant Clinical Professor of Perio- 
dontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1965. 

Lawrence J. Wisman, Assistant Clinical Professor of Re- 
movable Prosthodontics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1962; D.D.S., 1965; 
M.S.D., University of Washington, 1971. 

Sheldon J. Wollman, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1963. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Amira H. Arafat, Instructor of Oral Pathology 

D.D.S., Damascus University (Syria), 1959; M.S.D., 
University of Maryland, 1971. 

Thomas E. Baldwin, Instructor of Oral Diagnosis 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 1970. 

Michael J. Bennett, Clinical Instructor of Fixed Restora- 
tive Dentistry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1965; D.D.S., 1970. 

John R. Bradbury, Instructor of Fixed Restorative Den- 
tistry 
B.A., Ohio State University, 1969; D.D.S., 1972. 



Dorothy S. Britt, Instructor of Educational and Instruc- 
tional Resources 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1970; M.L.S., 1971. 

Jesse Caden, Clinical Instructor of Oral Diagnosis 

B.S., Georgetown University, 1934; D.D.S., New 
York University, 1941. 

Alfred J. DeRenzis, Instructor of Oral Health Care Deliv- 
ery 

B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1967; D.M.D., Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, 1971. 

Dorothy J. Duvall, Instructor of Dental Hygiene 
A. A., Catonsville Community College, 1969; B.S., 
University of Maryland, 1972. 

Samia A. Elias, Instructor of Removable Prosthodontics 
B.D.S., Alexandria University (Egypt), 1965. 

Gail J. Foster, Instructor of Dental Hygiene 
B.S., University of Michigan, 1974. 

James C. Gincell, Instructor of Fixed Restorative Den- 
tistry 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1968; D.D.S., 1972. 

Morris Glick, Clinical Instructor of Oral Pathology 
B.S., Franklin and Marshall, 1954; D.D.S., Baylor 
University, 1959. 

Raymond E. Geopfrich, Clinical Instructor of Fixed Re- 
storative Dentistry. B.S., Franklin and Mar- 
shall, 1957; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1961. 

Barry Graham, Clinical Instructor of Oral Health Care 
Delivery 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1969; D.D.S., 1973. 

Helen M. Hatfield, Instructor of Dental Hygiene 
A. A., Montgomery Junior College, 1962; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1973. 

John R. Iddings, Clinical Instructor of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., Roanoke College, 1962; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1966. 

Charles H. Johnson, Clinical Instructor of Oral Diag- 
nosis 

B.S., Morgan State College, 1948; D.D.S., Howard 
University, 1954. 

Barry M. Katz, Instructor of Fixed Restorative Dentistry 
D.D.S., West Virginia University, 1971. 

Marilyn Kaufman, Clinical Instructor of Oral Pathology 
B.S., Columbia University, 1971; M.S., 1972. 

Thomas C. Keller, Clinical Instructor of Oral Diagnosis 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1970; D.D.S., 1974. 

Makhdoom Ali Khan, Instructor of Anatomy 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1966; M.S., 1971; 
Ph.D., 1975. 

Julia W. Llewellyn, Instructor of Dental Hygiene 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1972. 

Elton P. Maddox, Jr., Instructor of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.S., Morgan State College, 1968; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1972. 

Henry A. Miller, Clinical Instructor of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1959; D.D.S., 
1964. 



Chris A. Moody, Clinical Instructor of Oral Diagnosis 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1968; D.D.S., 1971. 

Gordon A. Morse, Instructor of Oral Health Care Deliv- 
ery 

B.S., American International College, 1962; M.B.A., 
University of Miami, 1966. 

Patricia L. Mulford, Instructor of Dental Hygiene 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1974. 

.KateG. Perez, Instructor of Educational and Instructional 
Resources 
B.S., Prairie View College, 1943. 

Richard A. Reveley, Clinical Instructor of Oral Diagnosis 
B.A., Ohio State University, 1964; D.D.S., 1967. 

Orlando R. Sanidad, Instructor of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 
B.A., Ohio State University, 1969; D.D.S., 1972. 

Gary P. Schoppert, Clinical Instructor of Oral Diagnosis 
' B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., 1967. 

Mary Y. Smith, Instructor of Dental Hygiene 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1973. 

,Leah M. Staling, Instructor of Physiology 

; B.S., University of Maryland, 1944; M.S., 1948. 

David H. Steiner, Clinical Instructor of Oral Diagnosis 
, D.D.S., State University of New York, 1970. 

Raoul C. Vanden Bosche, Clinical Instructor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry 

A.B., College of the Holy Cross, 1962; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1966. 



• nwf«j< 



Administration and Faculty 163 



Oswaldene E. Walker, Instructor of Periodontics 

B.S., Howard University, 1961; M.S., 1966; D.D.S., 

1972. 
Nancy H. Wells, Instructor of Dental Hygiene (Special 

Patient Clinic) 

B.S., University of Bridgeport, 1974. 
Morton Wood, Instructor of Basic Dental Science 

B.A., American International College, 1965;D.D.S., 

University of Maryland, 1969. 
Bonnie S. J. Zaborny, Instructor of Dental Hygiene 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1972. 

SPECIAL LECTURERS 

Ray W. Alcox, Lecturer in Oral Diagnosis 

D.D.S., University of Minnesota, 1947. 
Cyrus L. Blanchard, Lecturer in Medicine 

M.D., George Washington University, 1946. 
Arthur Bushel, Lecturer in Oral Health Care Delivery 

A.B., Brooklyn College, 1940; D.D.S., Columbia 

University, 1943; M.P.H., 1947. 
Jerome D. Buxbaum, Lecturer in Physiology 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1951; D.D.S., 1955. 
Richard L. Christiansen, Lecturer in Orthodontics 

D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1959, M.S.D., Indiana 

University, 1964; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 

1970. 
Russell L. Corio, Lecturer in Oral Pathology 

B.S., Western Reserve University, 1953; D.D.S., 

1958; M.S.D., Indiana University, 1970. 



J ■ 









Dental Clinic, 1941 



64 / Administration and Faculty 



John M. Dennis, Lecturer in Medicine 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1945. 
Paul D. Frazier, Lecturer in Orthodontics 

B.S., McPherson College, 1958; D.D.S., University 

of Iowa, 1961; Ph.D., University of Washington, 

1971. 
Gerson Freedman, Lecturer in Oral Health Care Delivery 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 
Philip Graitcer, Lecturer in Oral Health Care Delivery 

D.D.S., Temple University, 1970; M.P.H., Harvard 

University, 1972. 
Sandra Lee Hamlet, Lecturer in Orthodontics 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1959; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Washington, 1967; Ph.D., 1970. 
Irving Hawkins, Jr., Lecturer in Oral Health Care Delivery 

B.S., St. Mary's College, 1951; D.D.S., Howard 

University, 1960. 
Martin Helrich, Lecturer in Medicine 

B.S., Dickinson College, 1946; M.D., University of 

Pennsylvania, 1946. 

Conrad I. Inman, Jr., Lecturer in Oral Health Care Deliv- 
ery 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1944. 

Alfred H. Jansen, Jr., Lecturer in Microbiology 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1958; B.S., 1962; 
M.S., 1968. 

Malcolm C. Johnson, Lecturer in Orthodontics 

D.D.S., University of Toronto, 1954; M.S.D., 1956; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1965. 

Patricia A. Landis, Lecturer in Pediatric Dentistry 
B.A., Heidelberg College, 1951; Case Western Re- 
serve University, 1956. 

L. Stephan Levin, Lecturer in Oral Pathology 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1960; D.D.S., 
1964; M.S.D., Indiana University, 1971. 

Joseph P. Libonati, Lecturer in Microbiology 

M.S., Duquesne University, 1965; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1968. 

Richard Lindenberg, Lecturer in Anatomy 
M.D., University of Berlin, 1944. 

Ethelbert LovETT, Lecturer in Oral Health Care Delivery 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

H. Berton McCauley, Lecturer in Oral Health Care De- 
livery 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1936. 

Victor A. McKusick, Lecturer in Oral Diagnosis 
M.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1946. 

Genevieve E. Matanoski, Lecturer in Oral Health Care 
Delivery 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1951; M.D., The Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1955; M.P.H., 1962; Dr.P.H., 1964. 

James E. Moore, Lecturer in Oral Health Care Delivery 
B.S., Howard University, 1949; D.D.S., 1957; 
M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 1970. 

Merrill J. Snyder, Lecturer in Microbiology 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1950. 

Paul Weinstein, Lecturer in Oral Health Care Delivery 
B.S., City College of New York, 1949; LL.B., New 
York University, 1952. 



Theodore E. Woodward, Lecturer in Medicine 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall College, 1934; M.D., 
University of Maryland, 1938. 

CLINICAL ASSOCIATES 

Paul D. Bingham, Clinical Associate in Oral Pathology 
B.A., St. Anselm's College, 1943; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1947. 

Richard R. Burt, Clinical Associate in Endodontics 
B.S., Loyola College, 1966; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1970. 

Albert J. Dietz, Jr., Clinical Associate in Pharmacology 
B.S., Loyola College, 1963; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1966; M.D., 1972. 

Glen D. Elliott, Clinical Associate in Oral Surgery 
D.D.S., University of Tennessee, 1957; M.S.D., 
New York University, 1968. 

Matthias Hourigan, Clinical Associate in Oral Surgery 
A.B., Kings College, 1954; D.D.S., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1958. 

Walter A. Rodriguez C, Clinical Associate in Oral 
Surgery 
M.D., San Marcos University, 1954. 

Ronald J. Taylor, Associate in Clinical Neuro- 
pharmacology 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1966; 
M.S., Yeshiva University (New York University), 
1968; M.D., University of Maryland, 1973. 

ASSOCIATE STAFF 

Virginia R. Barrett, Faculty Research Assistant in Oral 

Health Care Delivery 

B.A., Skidmore College, 1974. 
John W. Britt, Dental Technician 
Philip Holland, Assistant to the Dean for Fiscal and 

Personnel Matters 
Tony M. Kavali, Dental Clinic Administrator 
John A. Kichi, Coordinator of Telecommunications 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1969; M.A., Michi- 
gan State University, 1972. 
William F. King, Jr., Dental Technician 
Lawrence Kreutzer, Department of Orthodontics 
Myra R. Land, Administrative Assistant, Office of 

Academic Affairs 

B.A., Goucher College, 1956. 
Robin Missler, Research Assistant in Oral Health Care 

Delivery 

A.B., Syracuse University, 1973; M.S.W., 1974. 
Robert J. Organ, Department of Periodontics 
Joseph A. Rutherford, Dental Technician 
Nell M. Savopoulos, Administrative Assistant to the 

Dean 

B.A., Mary Washington College, 1953. 
Cynthia T. Snyder, Research Associate in Oral Health 

Care Delivery 

B.A., Towson State College, 1973. 
Frederick Suls, Dental Technician 
Earl F. Williams, Research Associate, Basic Dental Sci- 
ence 




Administration and Faculty 165 








66 /Administration and Faculty 

DEANS OF DENTAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
(FOUNDED 1840) 

Chapin A. Harris 1840-1841 

Thomas E. Bond 1841-1842 

Washington R. Handy 1842-1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853-1865 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1865-1882 

Richard B. Winder 1882-1894 

M. Whilldin Foster 1894-1914 

William G. Foster 1914-1923 

MARYLAND DENTAL COLLEGE 

1873-1878 
(Merged with Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 1878) 

Richard B. Winder 1873-1878 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1882-1911 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1911-1923 

BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1895-1913 
(Merged with University of Maryland in 1913) 

J. William Smith 1895-1901 

William A. Montell 1901-1903 

J. Edgar Orrison 1903-1904 

J. William Smith 1904-1913 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(Baltimore College of Dental Surgery joined the University of Maryland in 1923) 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1923-1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924-1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1953-1963 

John J. Salley 1963-1974 

Errol L. Reese (Acting Dean) 1974-1975 

Errol L. Reese 1975- 




University of Maryland Dental Infirmary 

Greene Street and Cider Alley 

1881 - 1904 



68 1 Alumni Association 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT 

Dr. Kyrle W. Preis 

Mt. Vista & Belair Roads 

Kingsville, Maryland 21087 

PRESIDENT-ELECT 
Dr. Conrad L. Inman, jr. 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

1ST VICE PRESIDENT 
Dr. Michael H. Ventura 
2069 East Belvedere Avenue 
Baltimore, Maryland 21239 

2ND VICE PRESIDENT 
Dr. Charles L. Page 
8403 Loch Raven Boulevard 
Baltimore, Maryland 21204 

SECRETARY 
Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio 
6810 North Charles Street 
Towson, Maryland 21204 

TREASURER 
Dr. J. Phillip Norris 
1207 Frederick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

EDITOR 

Dr. Kyrle W. Preis 

Mt. Vista & Belair Roads 

Kingsville, Maryland 21087 

HISTORIAN-ARCHIVIST 
Gardner P. H. Foley 
4407 Sedgwick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

PAST-PRESIDENT (Ex-Officio) 
Dr. William R. Patteson 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



UNIVERSITY ALUMNI 
COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES 

Dr. Harry W. F. Dressel — 1976 
6340 Frederick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 
Dr. Robert Fleishman — 1977 
1134 York Road 
Lutherville, Maryland 21093 
Dr. Clayton S. McCarl — 1978 
28 Ridge Road 
Greenbelt, Maryland 20770 
Dr. Joe N. Price 
6921 Annapolis Road 
Landover Hills, Maryland 21084 

ALTERNATES 

Dr. Gary P. Schoppert 

600 Wyndhurst Avenue 

Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

Dr. James R. Sullivan 

419 Burnt Mills Avenue 

Silver Spring, Maryland 20901 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Kyrle W. Preis 
Kingsville, Maryland 
Conrad L. Inman, Jr. 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Michael H. Ventura 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Charles L. Page 
Towson, Maryland 
Joseph P. Cappuccio 
Towson, Maryland 
J. Philip Norris 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Gardner P. H. Foley 
Baltimore, Maryland 
William R. Patteson 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Alumni Association 169 



ELECTED MEMBERS 

Joe N. Price — 1976 
6921 Annapolis Road 
Landover Hills, Maryland 21084 
D. Robert Swinehart — 1976 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
Anthony Bravos — 1977 
608 Sussex Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21204 

George H. Williams III — 1977 
12116 Jerusalem Road 
Kingsville, Maryland 21087 
Albert L. Ousborne — 1978 
714 York Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21204 
Don N. Brotman — 1978 
Horizon House 
I Baltimore, Maryland 21202 





ENDOWMENT FUND TRUSTEES 

TRUSTEES EX-OFFICIO 

Kyrle W. Preis, President 

Conrad L. Inman, Jr., President-Elect 

Joseph P. Cappuccio, Secretary 

J. Philip Norris, Treasurer 

Errol L. Reese, Dean 

ELECTED TRUSTEES 

A. James Kershaw — 1976 

11 Bank Street 

W. Warwick, Rhode Island, 02893 

Don N. Brotman — 1976 

Horizon House 

Baltimore, Maryland 21202 

Meyer Eggnatz — 1977 

3705 Garfield Street 

Hollywood, Florida 33021 

Lewis C. Toomey — 1977 

344 University Boulevard, West 

Silver Spring, Maryland 20910 

Alex L. Boro — 1978 

201 South Southwood Avenue 

Annapolis, Maryland 21401 

Jack M. Eskow — 1978 

147 Market Street 

Perth Amboy, New Jersey 08861 



70ICampus 



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BALTIMORE STREET 



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EXISTING CAMPUS PLAN 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 

1974 



PREFARED BY 

PHYSICAL PLANT DEPARTMENT 



Campus 171 



ABBREVIATION 


BUILDING NAME 


AHPB 


ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS BUILDING 


BRB 


BRESSLER RESEARCH BUILDING 


BU 


BALTIMORE UNION 


DVH 


DAVIDGE HALL 


GL 


GRAY LABORATORY 


HSCC 


HEALTH SCIENCES COMPUTER CENTER 


HSL 


HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 


IPHB 


INSTITUTE OF PSYCHIATRY & HUMAN BEHAVIOR 


KM 


KELLY MEMORIAL 


LBB 


LOMBARD BUILDING 


MIEM 


MARYLAND INSTITUTE FOR EMERGENCY MEDICINE 


MSS 


MASTER SWITCHING STATION 


MTB 


MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY BUILDING 


PH 


PARSONS HALL 


SFB 


STORAGE FACILITY BUILDING 


SSW & AB 


SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK & ADMIN. BUILDING 


UCB 


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE BUILDING 


WH 


WHITEHURST HALL 









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' XV 



"Within these stones and bricks, healing is to be administered, and no 
less important, human relationships developed between teachers and 
students and between students and patients. If ever patients are re- 
garded as clinical material, this building will have been degraded and its 
use corrupted. We must never forget that the word patient comes from 
the Latin root which means to suffer. Clinical material does not suffer. 
Human beings do." 

From the address of 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

Chairman of the Board of Regents 

University of Maryland 

Dedication of Hayden-Harris Hall 

March 5, 1971 




Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

Baltimore, Maryland 

21201 



I 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



• The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution. It adheres to all federal 
and state laws and regulations on non-discrimination regarding race, color, religion, age, 
national origin or sex. It adheres to all federal and state laws and regulations on non- 
discrimination regarding physical or mental handicap. 

• Students are considered for admission to the University of Maryland Dental School 
without regard to race, color, creed or sex. It is the objective of the School to enroll 
students with diversified backgrounds in order to make the educational experience more 
meaningful for each individual as well as to provide dental health practitioners to all 
segments of the community. 

• The Dental School is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Dental and 
Dental Auxiliary Educational Programs of the Council on Dental Education of the 
American Dental Association. 

• The University of Maryland has been elected to membership in the Association of 
American Universities. This Association, founded in 1900, is an organization of those 
universities in the United States and Canada generally considered to be preeminent in the 
fields of graduate and professional study and research. 

• The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University of Maryland. The University reserves the right to 
change any provision or requirement at any time within the student's term of residence, j 
The University further reserves the right, at any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it 
considers such action to be in the best interests of the University. 



DENTAL 

SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 

1978 -1980 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



CONTENTS 

General Information / 5 

Matriculation Policies and Procedures / 8 

Scholarship and Loan Funds/ 13 

The Dental Program / 16 

The Dental Hygiene Program / 38 

Advanced Education Programs / 45 

Student Life / 51 

Administration / 56 

Faculty / 58 

Alumni Association / 70 

Appendix / 72 

Campus Map / 75 

Index / 76 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Dentistry as a health service has dem- 
onstrated a variety of achievements since 
its birth as a profession in 1840. Not the 
least of these have been technical excel- 
lence in clinical procedures and an im- 
proved understanding of human biology. In 
the latter half of the twentieth century the 
profession has responded to a call for 
increased social awareness. As a university 
discipline dental education must meet and 
surpass its previous accomplishments in 
the continuing evolution of dental science. 



Also, as a part of a modern university, the 
Dental School must keep its programs fo- 
cused on the three basic aims of the 
academic community — teaching, research 
and service. 

The process of education, whether it 
be in dentistry, engineering, law, medicine, 
business administration or theology, is a 
dynamic and changing force which often 
presents a paradoxical profile. While it must 
remain anchored firmly to time-tested prin- 
ciples, it must also continually extend itself 
to uncover hidden truths within these same 
principles and thereby contribute to man's 



progress toward better understanding and 
control of his environment. 



THE SCHOOL 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore has the distinction of being the 
oldest dental college in the world. Formal 
education to prepare students for the prac- 
tice of dentistry originated in 1840 with the 
establishment of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery. The chartering of the school 
by the General Assembly of Maryland on 
February 1, 1840 represented the culmina- 
tion of the efforts of Dr. Horace H. Hayden 
and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, two dental practi- 
tioners who recognized the need for sys- 
tematic formal education as the foundation 
for a scientific and serviceable dental 
profession. Together they played a major 
role in establishing and promoting formal 
dental education, and in the development 
of dentistry as a profession. 

In the early 1800's dental teaching was 
accomplished by preceptorship; only a small 
percentage of the 1200 practicing dentists 
in the United States at that time had re- 
ceived collegiate instruction. The first lec- 
tures on dentistry in the United States were 
delivered by Dr. Hayden at the University 
of Maryland School of Medicine between 
1823 and 1825, after which they were 
discontinued as a result of internal dissen- 
sion in the School. 

Convinced that support for a formal 
course in dental education would not come 
from within medical schools, Dr. Hayden 
undertook the establishment of an inde- 
pendent dental college. Dr. Harris, an ener- 
getic and ambitious young man who had 
come to Baltimore in 1830 to study under 
Dr. Hayden, was active in the effort to 
found the College, relieving Hayden (who 
was seventy at the time) of many of the 
details involved in such an endeavor. 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
served as a prototype for dental schools 
gradually established in other American cit- 
ies and originated the pattern of modern 
dental education, with equal emphasis on 
sound knowledge of general medicine and 
development of the skills of dentistry. 
Through its contributions to dental and med- 
ical progress and through the prominent 



role of its faculty and graduates in the 
development of the profession, the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery has exerted 
a remarkable influence on professional den- 
tistry. 

The present dental school evolved 
through a series of consolidations involving 
the Maryland Dental College, which merged 
with the Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery in 1878; the Dental Department of the 
University of Maryland, founded in 1882; 
and the Dental Department of the Baltimore 
Medical College, which merged with the 
University of Maryland Dental Department 
in 1913. The final consolidation took place 
in 1923, when the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery and the University of Mary- 
land Dental School were combined to cre- 
ate a distinct department of the University 
under state supervision and control. 

The Dental School today offers one of 
the finest programs of dental education in 
the world. In 1970 the Dental School moved 
into Hayden-Harris Hall, a new five-story 
building with modern equipment and treat- 
ment facilities. Continuing efforts are made 
to provide educational and training experi- 
ences consistent with evolving concepts 
and advances in the delivery of dental 
health care. In response to the trend toward 
greater reliance on dental auxiliaries, the 
curriculum includes didactic and clinical ex- 
periences for all students in four-handed 
dentistry (DAU) and expanded function de- 
livery systems (TEAM). Comprehensive 
training is offered in dental care of the 
handicapped, for which a Special Patient 
Clinic was specifically designed and fur- 
nished. Students of dentistry and dental 
hygiene receive extramural experience in a 
public health clinic for the treatment of the 
geriatric patient. In 1976 an interdisciplinary 
"Dent-Pharm Program" was developed to 
provide for students in both disciplines train- 
ing designed to foster a close working 
relationship between dentists and pharma- 
cists and to further the "health team" con- 
cept of patient care; a dental pharmacy 
complements the program and provides 
practical experience. Elective clerkship and 
dental extern programs provide for selected 
students an opportunity to broaden their 
clinical experiences. 

In addition to the D.D.S. program, the 
School offers a baccalaureate degree pro- 



gram in dental hygiene designed to prepare 
students for careers in dental hygiene prac- 
tice, teaching and other areas related to 
this important dental auxiliary field. Gradu- 
ate programs leading to a master's or 
doctoral degree in anatomy, biochemistry, 
microbiology, oral pathology and physiology 
are also offered. Many faculty members 
are actively engaged in research; research 
opportunities are available to dental stu- 
dents as well as to graduate and postgrad- 
uate students. 

Postgraduate training in the specialty 
areas of endodontics, orthodontics, oral sur- 
gery, pediatric dentistry, periodontics and 
prosthodontics is offered. Internship-resi- 
dency programs in oral surgery and pedia- 
tric dentistry are affiliated with the University 
of Maryland Hospital as well as a number 
of other hospitals in the Baltimore area. 
The School recently established the Center 
for the Treatment of Dento-Facial Abnor- 
malities, one of only a few such facilities 
functioning in this country. The Center is in 
the forefront in diagnostic and treatment 
concepts related to this new and rapidly 
developing area of dentistry. The Center 
serves in a consultant capacity to under- 
graduate dental students and is integrated 
into postgraduate training in oral surgery, 
orthodontics, periodontics and prosthodon- 
tics. 

The School's continuing education pro- 
gram offers dental and dental auxiliary prac- 
titioners approximately fifty courses annually 
in special facilities designed for the pro- 
gram. In addition, study clubs meet during 
evening hours and self-instructional mate- 
rials are available to practitioners in the 
School's Independent Learning Center and 
at satellite centers throughout the state. 

At the end of the 1978-79 academic 
year the Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, Dental School, University of Maryland 
at Baltimore will have completed 139 years 
of service to dental education. Through its 
graduates — numbering more than 10,000 — 
the School continues to fulfill the aspirations 
of its founders to provide scientifically 
trained professionals to serve the oral 
health care needs of society. 

THE CAMPUS 

The Dental School is located on the 
campus of the University of Maryland at 
Baltimore in the heart of metropolitan Balti- 



more. Other major units of this campus are 
the Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, 
Pharmacy, Social Work and Community 
Planning, and the University of Maryland 
Hospital. These professional schools and 
their service programs contribute to the 
health and welfare of the citizens of Mary- 
land. The support and utilization of the 
University's services by community resi- 
dents in turn represent a vital resource for 
the University. The city of Baltimore is one 
of the important commercial, cultural, histor- 
ical and scientific centers in the eastern 
United States, and offers unlimited extracur- 
ricular activities to students and visitors. 

THE HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 

This School is fortunate to have one of 
the best-equipped and organized libraries 
of any dental school in the country. The 
dental collection is part of the Health Sci- 
ences Library, which serves all professional 
schools on the Baltimore campus. More 
than 175,000 bound volumes and 3,200 
current subscriptions to scientific periodicals 
in the fields of dentistry, medicine, nursing, 
pharmacy and social work are housed in a 
four-story library building at 1 1 1 South 
Greene Street. The availability of this facility 
on campus enables the Dental School to 
incorporate dental literature into the curricu- 
lum, thereby promoting the student's use of 
the literature as an important source of 
further knowledge and development when 
he becomes a practitioner. 

A well-qualified staff of professionally I 
trained and certified librarians is available 
to assist students in the use of the library's 
resources. Computerized literature searches 
by MEDLINE, the National Library of Medi- 
cine's system, are provided for students 
and faculty as part of the reference service. 
The library is open six nights a week until 
9:00 p.m., with a staff trained in reference 
services on duty most of these hours. 

MUSEUM OF THE BALTIMORE 
COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 



The Dental School Museum is housed in 
the Reading Room of the Independent 
Learning Center on the ground floor of 
Hayden-Harris Hall; special displays are 
appropriately located in other areas of the 
building. 

Because of its heritage from the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, and the 






importance of Baltimore in the development 
of professional dentistry, the Museum has 
developed a large and valuable collection 
of objects and specimens of historical and 
professional interest. Several items of par- 
ticular national and international interest, 
such as George Washington's dentures, 
have been loaned to the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution in Washington, D.C., where they may 
be shared with a larger audience. 

Items exhibited in the Museum include 
many early dental instruments, dental chairs 
and operatories, instrument cabinets, dental 
equipment, artificial dentures representing 
the various stages through which the art of 
dental prosthesis has progressed, replicas 
of ancient dental appliances, items relating 
to the development of the profession of 
dentistry and portraits of leaders in the 
development of professional dentistry. 

The Museum and the Independent Learn- 
ing Center are open throughout the year 
Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m., with extended hours evenings 
and Saturdays during the regular academic 
year; they are closed during official school 
holidays. Group tours are welcome, but 
arrangements must be made in advance. 



SPECIAL LECTURE FUNDS 

The Grayson W. Gaver Memorial Lecture 

Through the generosity of both his family 
and the School alumni, an endowed lecture- 
ship was established in memory of the late 
Dr. Grayson W. Gaver, an outstanding 
leader in the field of prosthodontics and a 
distinguished member of the faculty for 
many years. The Gaver Lecture is pre- 
sented annually as part of Student-Faculty 
Day activities. 

The William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell 
Lecture 

In 1965 two faithful alumni, Drs. William 
B. and Elizabeth S. Powell, presented the 
School with a generous contribution for the 
purpose of instituting special lectures for 
the benefit of the student body and faculty. 
The first lecture in the series was presented 
in April, 1966. These lectures provide a 
means of broadening the total academic 
program. 

In addition to these annual lectures, there 
are three special lectures which are pre- 
sented on a rotating basis once every three 



years as part of the Commencement/June 
Week activities: The John E. Fogarty 
Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the 
Rhode Island Section of the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery Alumni Association; 
The Hayden-Harris Memorial Lecture, 
sponsored by the Alumni Association; and 
the J. Ben Robinson Memorial Lecture, 
sponsored by the Maryland Section of the 
American College of Dentists. 



1978-1979 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

Following is a tentative academic calen- 
dar for 1978-79. This schedule is subject 
to change, and is provided only for general 
information concerning the length of terms 
and holidays. 

August 23-25 Freshman orientation 

August 28 First semester begins 

September 4 Labor Day 

(school closed) 

November 23-24 Thanksgiving recess 
(two days) 

December 13 First semester ends 

December 14-19 Exam week 

December 20- 
January 2 

January 3-26 



Christmas recess 
(ten days) 

Minimester 



January 15 

January 29 
February 19 

April 13-16 
May 18 



Martin Luther King's 
Birthday 
(school closed) 

Second semester 
begins 

George Washington's 
Birthday 
(school closed) 

Easter recess 
(two days) 

Second semester 
ends 



May 21-25 Exam week 

June 1 Graduation 

June 11 -July 20 Summer session 



MATRICULATION POLICIES 
AND PROCEDURES 




REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

To attend classes at the UMAB campus 
it is necessary to process an official regis- 
tration. All students are required to register 
each term in accordance with current regis- 
tration procedures. Fees are due and paya- 
ble on the dates specified for registration. 
Registration is not completed until all finan- 
cial obligations are satisfied. Students who 
do not complete their registration, including 
the payment of their bill on the registration 
days, will be subject to a late registration 
fee. 

Courses taken concurrently with a UMAB 
registration at another campus or institution 
must have program approval in advance by 
the appropriate UMAB officials. Off-campus 
registration forms are available in each 
dean's office and the Registrar's Office. 

Although the University regularly mails 
bills to preregistered students, it cannot 
assume responsibility for their receipt. If 
any student does not receive a bill prior to 
the beginning of a semester in which he/ 
she has preregistered, it is the student's 
responsibility to contact the Office of the 
Registrar or Office of the Cashier, Howard 
Hall, during normal business hours. 



Any enrolled student may request at reg- 
istration the postponement of payment of 
one-half of the fixed charges for thirty (30) 
days; all other fees are due and payable. 
For this service a charge of $2.00 will be 
made. 

If a satisfactory settlement or agreement 
for settlement is not made with the Business 
Office within ten days after a payment is 
due, the student automatically is debarred 
from attendance at classes and will forfeit 
the other privileges of the Dental School. 

All checks and money orders should be 
made payable to the University of Maryland 
for the exact amount of the actual bill. 

No diploma, certificate or transcript of 
record will be issued to a student who has 
not made satisfactory settlement of his Uni- 
versity account. 

DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE 
STATUS 

An initial determination of in-state status 
for admission, tuition and charge-differential 
purposes will be made by the University at 
the time a student's application for admis- 
sion is under consideration. The determina- 
tion made at that time, and any determina- 



8 



tion made thereafter shall prevail in each which might in any way affect their classifi- 

semester until the determination is success- cation at UMAB. 

fully challenged. The determination of in-state status for 

Students classified as in-state for admis- admission, tuition and charge-differential 

sion, tuition and charge-differential purposes purposes is the responsibility of the Office 

are responsible for notifying the Office of of Admissions and Registrations. Copies of 

Admissions, in writing, within fifteen (15) the University's policy are available in the 

days of any change in their circumstances Admissions Office and in each dean's office. 

TUITION AND FEES 
1977-78 

DENTAL PROGRAM 

Matriculation (New Students) $ 

Tuition (Fixed Charges) 

In-State 

Out-of-State 

Instructional Resources Fee 

Student Activities Fee 

Student Health Fee 

Health Insurance* 

One Person 

Two Persons 

Family 

Supporting Facilities Fee 

Student Liability Insurance 

Dormitory Fee 

Single Occupancy 

Double Occupancy 

Graduation Fee (Seniors) 

* Health insurance, University's program or equivale 
dental students. 

DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM 

Matriculation (New Students) $ 

Tuition (Fixed Charges) 

In-State 

Out-of-State 

Instructional Resources Fee 

Student Activities 

Student Health Fee 

Health Insurance* 

One Person 

Two Persons 

Family 

Supporting Facilities Fee 

Student Liability Insurance 

Dormitory Fee 

Single Occupancy 

Double Occupancy 

Graduation Fee (Seniors) 

* Health insurance, University's program or equivaler 
dental students. 



Fall 

15.00 


Spring 

$ - 


Total 

$ 15.00 


875.00 

1775.00 

20.00 

10.00 

5.00 


875.00 

1775.00 

20.00 

10.00 

5.00 


1750.00 

3550.00 

40.00 

20.00 

10.00 


83.94 

167.58 

222.30 

30.00 

15.00 


83.94 
167.58 
222.30 

30.00 


167.88 

335.16 

444.60 

60.00 

15.00 


402.50 
377.50 


402.50 

377.50 

15.00 


805.00 

755.00 

15.00 


3nt insurance coverage 


, required of c 


Fall 

15.00 


Spring 

$ - 


Total 

$ 15.00 


310.00 

1025.00 

15.00 

10.00 

5.00 


310.00 

1025.00 

15.00 

10.00 

5.00 


620.00 

2050.00 

30.00 

20.00 

10.00 


83.94 
167.58 
222.30 

30.00 
8.50 


83.94 
167.58 
222.30 

30.00 


167.88 

335.16 

444.60 

60.00 

8.50 


402.50 
377.50 


402.50 

377.50 

15.00 


805.00 

755.00 

15.00 


nt insurance coverage, 


required of all 



POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM 

Fall 

Matriculation (New Students) $ 1 5.00 

Tuition (Fixed Charges) 

In-State 742.00 

Out-of-State 1 295.00 

Instructional Resources Fee 15.00 

Student Activities Fee 10.00 

Student Health Fee 5.00 

Health Insurance (Optional) 

One Person 83.94 

Two Persons 1 67.58 

Family 222.30 

Supporting Facilities Fee 30.00 

Dormitory Fee 

Single Occupancy 402.50 

Double Occupancy 377.50 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

Fall 

Matriculation (New Students) $ 15.00 

Tuition (Fixed Charges) Per Credit Hour 

In-State 50.00 

Out-of-State 85.00 

Instructional Resources Fee — 

Student Activities Fee (Full & Part-time) 7.00 

Student Health Fee (Full-time) 5.00 

(Part-time) 2.00 

Health Insurance (Optional) 

One Person 83.94 

Two Persons 1 67.58 

Family 222.30 

Continuous Registration Fee 10.00 

Supporting Facilities Fee (Full-time) 30.00 

(Part-time) 6.00 

Graduation Fee (Master's Degree) 15.00 

(Doctoral Degree) 60.00 

Dormitory Fee (Single Occupancy) 402.50 

(Double Occupancy) 377.50 



Spring 


Total 


S - 


$ 15.00 


742.00 


1485.00 


1295.00 


2590.00 


15.00 


30.00 


10.00 


20.00 


5.00 


10.00 


83.94 


167.88 


167.58 


335.16 


222.30 


444.60 


30.00 


60.00 


402.50 


805.00 


377.50 


755.00 


Spring 


Total 


$ - 


$ 15.00 


50.00 




85.00 


— 


7.00 


14.00 


5.00 


10.00 


2.00 


4.00 


83.94 


167.88 


167.58 


335.16 


222.30 


444.60 


10.00 


20.00 


30.00 


60.00 


6.00 


12.00 


15.00 


15.00 


60.00 


60.00 


402.50 


805.00 


377.50 


755.00 



EXPLANATION OF FEES 

The Application and/or Matriculation 

Fee partially defrays the cost of processing 
applications for admission and enrollment 
data in the professional schools. These are 
not refundable. The Application Fee will be 
applied against the Matriculation Fee for 
accepted students. 

The Continuous Registration Fee is 
applicable to students who have been ad- 
vanced to candidacy and who have com- 
pleted the thesis or dissertation. 

The Instructional Resources Fee is 
charged to provide supplies, materials, 



equipment and to defray other costs directly 
associated with the instructional program. 

The Student Activities Fee is used to 
meet the costs for various student activities 
student publications and cultural programs 
In each of the schools that has a Student 
Activities Fee, the Student Government As 
sociation, in cooperation with the dean's 
office of the school, recommends expendi 
ture of the fee collected. 

The Student Health Fee is charged to) 
help defray the cost of providing a Student 
Health Service. This service includes rou J 
tine examinations and emergency care. Ac-: 



10 



ceptable medical insurance is required in 
addition to the Student Health Fee. 

Health insurance is required of all full- 
time students. A brief outline of the Student 
Health Insurance Program is furnished each 
student. Students with equivalent insurance 
coverage must provide proof of such cover- 
age to the dean at the time of registration 
and obtain a Health Insurance Waiver. 

The Supporting Facilities Fee is used 
for expansion of various campus facilities 
that are not funded or are funded only in 
part from other sources. 

Student Liability Fee (malpractice) is 
charged all professional school students. 

The Graduation Fee is charged to help 
defray costs involved with qraduation and 
commencement. 

Fees for Auditors are the same as those 
charged for courses taken for credit at 
both the undergraduate and graduate level. 
Audited credit hours will be added to a 
student's total credit enrollment to deter- 
mine whether or not a student is full-time 
or part-time for tuition and fee assessment 
purposes. 

Special students are assessed tuition 
and fees in accordance with the schedule 
for the comparable undergraduate, gradu- 
ate or first professional classification. 

• A service charge is assessed for dis- 
honored checks and is payable for 
each check which is returned unpaid 
by the drawee bank on initial presen- 
tation because of insufficient funds, 
payment stopped, postdating, drawn 
against uncollected items, etc. 

For checks up to 

$50.00 $5.00 

For checks from 

$50.01 to $100.00 $10.00 

For checks over 

$100.00 $20.00 

• A Late Registration Fee is charged to 
defray the cost of the special handling 
involved for those who do not complete 
their registration on the prescribed 
days. 

• No degree will be conferred, nor any 
diploma, certificate, or transcript of rec- 
ord issued to a student who has not 
made satisfactory settlement of his 
account. 

• The University reserves the right to 
make such changes in fees and other 
charges as may be necessary. 



WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF 
FEES 

Students desiring to leave the School at 
any time during the academic year are 
required to file with the Dean a letter of 
resignation. In addition, an Application for 
Withdrawal Form bearing the proper signa- 
tures must be filed with the Office of the 
Registrar. The student must satisfy the 
authorities that he has no outstanding obli- 
gations to the School and return his student 
identification card. 

If the above procedures are not com- 
pleted, the student will not be entitled to 
honorable dismissal and will forfeit the right 
to any refunds to which he would otherwise 
be entitled. The date used in computing 
refunds is the date the application for with- 
drawal is signed by the Dean. 

Refunds 

Students officially withdrawing from the 
School will be credited for all academic 
fees charged to them less the Matriculation 
Fee, in accordance with the following 
schedule from the date instruction begins: 

Period from Date 

Instruction Begins Refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks . . . 60% 
Between three and four weeks . . 40% 
Between four and five weeks .... 20% 
Over five weeks 



OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY RECORDS 
Transcript of Record 

Students and alumni may secure tran- 
scripts of their UMAB record from the Re- 
gistrar's Office. There is a transcript charge 
of $2.00 per copy. Checks should be made 
payable to the University of Maryland. 
There is no charge for issuance of tran- 
scripts between University of Maryland cam- 
puses. A request for transcripts must be 
made in writing and should be made at 
least two (2) weeks in advance of the date 
when the records are actually needed. 
Transcripts are issued in turn as requests 
are received. 

No transcript will be furnished any student 
or alumnus whose financial obligations to 
the University have not been satisfied. 

11 




Disclosure of Information 

The policy of the University of Maryland 
regarding access to and release of student 
data/information, in compliance with the 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
of 1974 (Buckley Amendment), appears in 
the Appendix. 

DIPLOMA APPLICATION 

Degree requirements vary according to 
the UMAB school/program in which a stu- 
dent is registered. However, each degree 
candidate must file a formal application for 
diploma with the Office of the Registrar at 
the beginning of the term in which he/she 
expects to graduate. This must be done by 
the end of the third week of the semester 
or the second week of the summer session. 

A student who does not graduate on the 
originally expected date must reapply for 
graduation by the appropriate deadline. 

STUDENT HEALTH 
REQUIREMENTS 

All students are required to have Blue 
Cross hospitalization insurance or its equiv- 
alent. A special Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
student policy is available to all students 
enrolling in the School. Detailed information 
regarding the provisions of the student pol- 
icy may be obtained from the Student 
Health Office. At the time of registration 
each student must either purchase the stu- 
dent Blue Cross/Blue Shield coverage or 
produce certified proof of equivalent cover- 
age. 



12 



Upon arrival on campus, students are 
required to have a tuberculin skin test and 
chest x-ray as part of the registration proc- 
ess. Students with a negative tuberculin 
skin test will be retested each year upon 
returning to school. Students who convert 
from negative to positive skin tests are 
examined; an x-ray of the chest will be 
obtained at intervals and suppressive medi- 
cation may be recommended. 

In addition to tuberculin skin tests and 
chest x-ray, each student is required to 
undergo a physical examination, including 
a urinalysis, at the Health Service Office. 

Each new student is also required by the 
Dental School to undergo an oral diagnosis 
examination. The final acceptance of any 
student is contingent upon the correction of 
any defects noted during this examination 
within the first academic year. 

Prospective students are advised to have 
any known physical defects corrected be- 
fore entering the Dental School in order to 
prevent loss of time which later correction 
might involve. 

The Dental School does not accept re- 
sponsibility for an illness or accident occur- 
ring away from the community, or for ex- 
penses incurred for hospitalization or 
medical services not authorized by the Stu 
dent Health Service. 



STUDENT PROFESSIONAL 
INSURANCE 

It is the policy of the Dental School that 
all students involved in clinical patient care 
be required to show evidence of malpractice 
insurance coverage as a condition for en- 
rollment in any academic period. This policy 
applies to all first, second, third and fourth- 
year undergraduate dental students and to 
third and fourth-year dental hygiene stu- 
dents. Undergraduate students, both dental 
and dental hygiene, will obtain malpractice 
coverage through a group program of the 
American Student Dental Association (The 
Professional Protector Plan) for a reasona- 
ble premium. This Plan, payable at enroll- 
ment each year, can also provide equip- 
ment coverage for an additional nominal 
premium. Information regarding professional 
coverage for undergraduate students is 
available through the Dental School's Office 
of Student Affairs or the Associate Dean for 
Clinical Affairs. 



SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN FUNDS 




must be completed within ten years from 
that time. The current interest rate is 3 
percent per annum. Borrowers who practice 
in an area where there is a shortage of 
dentists may annually cancel 10 percent of 
the loan, up to a maximum of 50 percent. If 
the practice occurs in a designated low 
income district, cancellation at 15 percent 
annually, up to 100 percent of the loan, is 
allowed. 



Bank Loans 

Through the Maryland Higher Education 
Loan Corporation and the United Student 
Aid Fund, loan programs which permit stu- 
dents to borrow money from their home 
town banks have been established. Gradu- 
ate and professional students may borrow 
up to $5,000 per year to assist in meeting 
their educational expenses. Borrowers be- 
gin repayment ten months after graduation 
or withdrawal from school. At the present 
time, simple interest is charged at the rate 
of 7 percent. Further details may be secured 
from the UMAB Office of Student Aid. 



DENTAL STUDENTS 

State Grants 

In an attempt to meet the ever increasing 
needs of students, the Maryland legislature 
each year allocates to the University funds 
earmarked for student assistance. As a 
result, state grants are available to disad- 
vantaged students who demonstrate a fi- 
nancial need. Awards are made on an 
individual basis after careful review of the 
student's current financial situation. 



Health Professions Student Loans 

Under the Federal Health Professions 
Program, loans are made available to qual- 
1 ified students. Loans are reviewed on an 
annual basis and vary in amount depending 
on the student's financial need. Students 
are not assessed interest premiums until 
they graduate and begin repayment. Repay- 
ment begins one year after graduation and 



The Edward S. Gaylord 
Educational Endowment Fund 

Under a provision of the will of the late 
Dr. Eidward S. Gaylord of New Haven, 
Connecticut, an amount approximating 
$16,000, the proceeds of which are to be 
devoted to aiding worthy students in secur- 
ing a dental education, was bequeathed to 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore. 



The W. K. Kellogg Foundation 

During World War II the Foundation rec- 
ognized the burden that the accelerated 
course imposed upon many dental students 
who, under normal circumstances, would 
earn money for their education by employ- 
ment during the summer vacation. The 
Foundation granted to this School a fund to 
provide rotating loans to deserving dental 
students. 



13 



The Albert A. Harrington Fund 

This fund was established in 1954 by the 
New Jersey Alumni Association in memory 
of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of 
the Class of 1910. The fund is a source of 
valuable help in aiding students to solve 
temporary financial problems. 



The Student Dental Association- 
Alumni Fund 

This fund, created in 1960, was estab- 
lished for the purpose of aiding any student 
who may be in need of an emergency loan. 

Russell Gigliotti Memorial Student 
Loan Fund 

The Russell Gigliotti Memorial Student 
Loan Fund is intended to provide financial 
assistance primarily but not exclusively to 
students in the preclinical years, for which 
costs are significantly higher because of 
required instrument and material purchases. 
Any undergraduate dental student who 
qualifies for financial aid, and who is unable 
to secure other University financial assist- 
ance, is eligible to apply. 

A maximum of $500 annually will be 
loaned to one student; no student may 
receive more than two loans during the 
period of training. Simple interest at the 
rate of 5 percent per annum will be charged, 
commencing three months after graduation. 
Principal plus interest must be repaid within 
twenty-seven months following graduation. 

The fund was established in 1977 in 
memory of Dr. Russell Gigliotti, an alumnus 
and dedicated member of the faculty for 
more than thirty years, and is supported by 
alumni, faculty and student contributions. 

American Fund for Dental Health 

The predecessor of the American Fund 
for Dental Health, the American Fund for 
Dental Education, was initially incorporated 
in 1955 through the efforts of the American 
Dental Association. The change in name 
reflects a broadening of the original purpose 
of the fund, which was to provide financial 
assistance for deserving students through- 
out the nation. Objectives of the AFDH 
include support for research, dental health 
and public education projects in addition to 
financial assistance for dental schools and 



14 



their students. Scholarship and loan funds 
for both dental and dental auxiliary students 
are available through AFDH. 

The International College of 
Dentists Student Loan Fund 

In 1962 the International College of Den- 
tists established a fund to assist deserving 
senior students in need of financial aid. 

Gillette Hayden Memorial 
Foundation Student Loan Program 

This loan is available to promising women 
students in their junior, senior or graduate 
years of dental school. At this time the 
amount of each loan is not to exceed 
$1,000.00, repayable one year and one 
month after the date of graduation at a per 
annum interest of 1 percent. There is no 
formal application form; requirements are a 
transcript of the applicant's academic re- 
cord, a letter of recommendation from the 
Dean, a character reference from a reputa- 
ble person in the applicant's home town, 
and the name and address of the nearest 
relative. All inquiries should be addressed 
to the Gillette Hayden Memorial Foundation, 
Suite 204, 33 Ponce de Leon Avenue, N. 
E., Atlanta, Georgia 30308. 

DENTAL HYGIENE STUDENTS 

Financial aid, in the form of scholarships, 
grants and loans, is awarded to students 
based upon apparent academic ability and 
financial need. Recipients of financial aid 
are expected to make satisfactory progress 
toward attainment of a degree and to abide 
by all academic and non-academic regula- 
tions of the University. In the case of new 
students, applicants must have been ac- 
cepted for admission to the University be- 
fore the financial aid application can be 
reviewed. 

Requests for information about and appli- 
cations for financial aid for predental hy- 
giene students should be addressed to the 
Student Aid Office at the campus to which 
the student is admitted. Dental hygiene 
students (junior and senior standing) should 
write to the Student Aid Office, University 
of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, Mary- 
land 21201. 

Because each campus has its own filing 
deadline, applicants should contact the Fi- 



nancial Aid Office on the appropriate cam- 
pus early in the spring semester to obtain a 
financial aid application and learn the filing 
deadline. Financial aid is awarded for only 
one academic year; a new application must 
be filed to apply for aid in a succeeding 
year. 

State Grants 

Dental hygiene students are eligible for 
state grants which are described on page 
13. 

General State Tuition Scholarships 

The General Assembly of Maryland pro- 
vides a number of limited tuition scholar- 
ships to students entering college for the 
first time. The scholarships may be used in 
any approved institution of higher education 
within the state. At the University of Mary- 
land, they cover the items listed as fixed 
charges. Awards are made by the State 
Scholarship Board based upon financial 
need and the results of a competitive ex- 
amination, usually given during the month 
of November. For additional information and 
applications contact high school guidance 
counselors or the Maryland State Scholar- 
ship Board, 2100 Guilford Avenue, Balti- 
more, Maryland 21218. 

General Assembly Grants 

These grants are awarded by members 
of the legislature to persons living in the 
legislative district represented by the dele- 
gate or senator. 

i 
American Dental Hygienists' 

| Association Scholarship and Loan 
Program 

The American Dental Hygienists' Associ- 
ation administers two scholarship programs: 
the Certificate Scholarship Program for stu- 
dents entering the final year of a dental 
hygiene curriculum and the Post Dental 
Hygiene Scholarship Program for certificate 
dental hygienists who will be enrolled in a 
program leading to a baccalaureate degree. 
Dental hygiene students enrolled or ac- 
cepted for full-time enrollment may also be 
considered for American Dental Hygienists" 
Association Loans which range from $500 
to $1,000 annually. Repayment begins ten 



months after graduation with 7.5 percent 
interest on the amount of the loan outstand- 
ing. For further information about these 
scholarships write directly to the American 
Dental Hygienists' Association, 211 East 
Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611. 

In addition, local chapters of the ADHA 
may offer scholarships and/or loans. For 
information, contact the JADHA advisor on 
the dental hygiene faculty. 

National Direct Student Loans 

The University receives an annual Na- 
tional Direct Student Loan appropriation 
from the federal government that is used 
as part of the School's loan fund. National 
Direct Student Loan allocations are based 
on the same considerations as other finan- 
cial aid awards. Repayment of a NDSL 
begins one year after the borrower ceases 
to be a full-time student. The loan is repaid 
at a minimum rate of $45.00 per quarter; 
repayment must be completed within ten 
years. No interest is charged on the loan 
until the student graduates. After that date, 
interest accrues at the rate of 3 percent per 
annum. 

Supplemental Educational 
Opportunity Grants 

Under provisions established by the fed- 
eral government, limited grants are avail- 
able to encourage students of exceptional 
financial need to continue their postsecond- 
ary school education. A recipient must be a 
United States citizen enrolled as a full-time 
undergraduate. Applications are available 
at most undergraduate financial aid offices. 

Bank Loans 

Most states have established federal 
guaranteed loan programs which permit 
students to borrow money from a home 
town bank. In most states undergraduates 
in good standing may borrow up to $2,500 
per year to assist in meeting their educa- 
tional expenses. Borrowers begin repay- 
ment ten months after graduation or with- 
drawal from school. At the present time, 
simple interest is charged at the rate of 7 
percent. Further details concerning the 
Maryland program or programs in other 
states may be secured from the Student 
Financial Aid Office or a local bank. 



15 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 




REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore subscribes to a policy of equal 
educational opportunity for men and women 
of all races, creeds and ethnic origins. The 
Dental School, in seeking to broaden the 
racial and ethnic balance of its enrollment, 
encourages minority student applications. It 
is the objective of the School to enroll 
students with diversified backgrounds in 
order to make the educational experience 
more meaningful for each individual as well 
as to provide dental health practitioners to 
all segments of the community. 

Applicants for admission to the dental 
program must have successfully completed 
at least three academic years in an ac- 
credited college of arts and sciences. The 
college course must include at least a 
year's credit in English (6), in biology (8), 
in physics (8) , in general or inorganic chem- 
istry (8) , and in organic chemistry (8) . All 
required science courses shall include both 
classroom and laboratory instruction. In ad- 



16 



dition to the 90 semester hours of credit 
required (exclusive of physical education 
and military science), other courses in the 
humanities and the biological and social 
sciences are desirable. No more than 60 of 
the minimum required credits will be ac- 
cepted from a junior college; these credits 
must have been validated by an accredited 
college of arts and sciences. By the ruling 
of the Faculty Council, all admission re- 
quirements must be completed by June 30 
prior to the desired date of admission. 

All applicants must also present favorable 
recommendations from their respective pre- 
dental committee or, if no such committee 
is available, from one instructor each in the 
Departments of Biology and Chemistry. In 
all other respects, applicants must give 
every promise of becoming successful stu- 
dents and dentists of high standing. Appli- 
cants will not be admitted with unabsolved 
conditions or unabsolved failures. 

Maryland residents should have science 
and cumulative grade point average (GPA) 
values of 2.6 or higher to be competitive for 



admission; nonresidents must have GPA 
values of 3.3 or higher to meet minimum 
requirements for admission. All applicants 
are required to take the Dental Admissions 
Test (DAT) in April of the year prior to 
admission. A pamphlet describing the test 
and an application to take the test will be 
sent upon request to the Office of Recruit- 
ment and Admissions of the Dental School. 
The pamphlet lists the dates of the tests 
(given in April and October) and the location 
of testing centers throughout the United 
States, its possessions and Canada. Resi- 
dents of Maryland should have scores of 4 
or higher in the Academic Average, Two- 
Dimensional Perceptual Motor Ability Test 
(2D-PMAT), and the Three-Dimensional 
Perceptual Motor Ability Test (3D-PMAT) 
sections in order to be competitive; nonres- 
idents must have scores of 5 or higher in 
these sections to be considered for admis- 
; sion. Information on the regulations for the 
' determination of resident status may be 
obtained from the Office of Admissions and 
Registrations, Room 132, Howard Hall, Uni- 
versity of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21201. 

APPLICATION AND ACCEPTANCE 
PROCEDURES 

Students are admitted only at the begin- 
ning of the fall semester in September. All 
applications are processed through the 
American Association of Dental Schools 
Application Service (AADSAS). An AAD- 
SAS application request card will be sent to 
the applicant after May 1 of the year prior 
to the desired date of admission, upon 
request to the Office of Recruitment and 
Admissions of the Dental School. The AAD- 
SAS application must be filed by all appli- 
cants prior to December 1; early filing of 
the application is strongly recommended. 
AADSAS will analyze the transcript and 
calculate the grade point average of each 
applicant, and furnish pertinent information 
to the Committee on Dental Student Admis- 
sions. 

If the minimum requirements for admis- 
sion are fulfilled, the applicant will receive 
the Dental School's application form, which 
should be completed and mailed with the 
application fee ($15.00) to the Office of 
Recruitment and Admissions of the Dental 
School. Receipt of the application will be 
acknowledged by the Committee on Dental 



Student Admissions. If this acknowledge- 
ment is not received within ten days, the 
applicant should contact the Office of Re- 
cruitment and Admissions. All applicants 
who are seriously being considered by the 
Dental Student Admissions Committee will 
be interviewed; a personal interview does 
not, however, guarantee admission. The 
Dental Student Admissions Committee, 
composed of members of the faculty, stu- 
dents and alumni, selects qualified appli- 
cants for admission based on the appli- 
cants grade point average, DAT scores, 
personal recommendations and the per- 
sonal interview. A deposit of $200 must 
accompany an applicants acceptance of 
an offer of admission. The deposit is in- 
tended to ensure registration in the class, 
is credited toward the applicant's tuition, 
and is not refundable. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED 
STANDING 

It is the policy of the Faculty Council of 
the Dental School that neither graduates of 
foreign dental schools nor students transfer- 
ring from dental schools outside the conti- 
nental United States be considered for ad- 
mission with advanced standing. Graduates 
of foreign dental schools may take an 
examination given by the Maryland State 
Board of Dental Examiners in order to 
qualify for a license to practice in the State 
of Maryland. Those who do not pass the 
examination can make application, accord- 
ing to established policies and procedures, 
to be considered for admission to the Dental 
School as a regular first-year student. Any 
student accepted for admission may be 
exempted from certain courses by passing 
the placing-out examination. 

Students currently attending a dental 
school in the continental United States may 
apply for admission with advanced standing, 
but must be in good standing in scholarship 
and character to be considered for admis- 
sion. 

An applicant for transfer from another 
dental school must: 

• meet fully the requirements for admis- 
sion described above 

• be eligible for advancement to the 
next higher class in the school from 
which the applicant seeks to transfer 

• have an overall average of C (2.0 on 
a 4.0 scale) in all previous dental 

17 



school courses excluding basic dental 
science or its equivalent, in which the 
applicant must have a grade of C or 
higher 
• present a letter of honorable with- 
drawal and recommendation from the 
dean of the school from which the 
applicant is transferring 
All applicants who meet these require- 
ments will be sent the Dental School's 
application forms and will be scheduled for 
an interview. The record of each applicant 
applying for admission by transfer will be 
referred to the appropriate Advancement 
Committee for review and recommendation 
concerning acceptance. The admission of a 
student by transfer is in every case contin- 
gent upon the availability of space in the 
class to which the student is seeking admis- 
sion. Credit hours as listed in the prior 
academic record of the transferring student 
will be prorated to conform with the cumu- 
lative credit hours of students in that class, 
in order to establish a comparable cumula- 
tive grade point average and class rank for 
purposes of University and Dental School 
honors, letters of recommendation, etc. 



OPTIONAL COMBINED ARTS AND 
SCIENCES-DENTAL PROGRAM 

The University of Maryland at College 
Park and University of Maryland Baltimore 
County offer a combined arts and sciences 
dental curriculum leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Dental 
Surgery. The preprofessional part of this 
curriculum may be taken in residence in 
the College of Arts and Sciences on either 
campus, and the professional part in the 
Dental School in Baltimore. Students who 
have been approved for the combined pro- 
gram and who have completed the arts 
and sciences phase of it may, upon the 
recommendation of the Dean of the Dental 
School, be granted the degree of Bachelor 
of Science by the College of Arts and 
Sciences at the first summer commence- 
ment following the completion of the stu- 
dent's first year in the Dental School. A 
student may enter the arts and sciences- 
dental program at College Park or UMBC 
with advanced standing from an accredited 
college or university; however, the last year 
of the preprofessional training must be com- 
pleted at College Park or UMBC and the 



18 



professional training must be completed in 
the Dental School of the University of Mary- 
land. Further information and applications 
may be obtained from the Office of Admis- 
sions at the respective undergraduate col- 
lege. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES 

In the evaluation of student performance, 
the following letter grades are used: 

A — excellent 

B — superior 

C — average 

D — below average 

F — failure 

I — incomplete 

E — unsatisfactory 

A failure must be remediated by repeating 
the entire course, in which case the original 
F grade remains on the student's perma- 
nent record, but only the remediated grade 
is used to compute the grade point average. 

A student whose performance at the end 
of a course is not satisfactory in one or 
more segments or in some clinical proce- 
dures may receive the E grade. This grade 
implies that the student can achieve a 
satisfactory level of proficiency within a 
short time, without having to repeat the 
entire course. The E grade, which also 
remains on the student record, is used only 
as a temporary final grade. Following suc- 
cessful remediation, the student will receive 
the final grade earned in the course. Failure 
to remediate will result in a permanent 
grade of F. 

A student whose work in completed as- 
signments is of acceptable quality but who, 
because of circumstances beyond his con- 
trol (such as illness or disability), has been 
unable to complete course requirements 
will receive a grade of Incomplete. When 
all requirements have been satisfied, the 
student will receive the final grade earned 
in the course. Except under extraordinary 
circumstances, an Incomplete may not be 
carried into the next academic year. 

In the clinical sciences, performance at 
the D level is unacceptable; thus the D 
grade is not used by the clinical depart- 
ments or Basic Dental Science. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the 
basis of credits assigned to each course 
and the following numerical values for 
grades: A-4, B-3, C-2, D-1, F-0. The 
grade point average is the sum of the 



products of course credits and grade val- 
ues, divided by the total number of course 
credits in that year of the curriculum. 

Students must achieve a 2.0 grade point 
average in order to advance unconditionally 
to the next year. Probationary advancement 
may be permitted for students in the follow- 
ing categories: 

1) First-year students who obtain a grade 
point average of 1 .70-1 .99 

2) Second-year students who obtain a 
grade point average of 1.70-1.99 in 
second-year courses 

3) Third-year students who obtain a 
grade point average of 1.85-1.99 in 
third-year courses 

A student placed on probationary status 
must achieve a minimum 2.0 average in 
courses taken during the probationary year, 
since probationary status for two successive 
years is not permitted. 

A student may remediate one or more 
course failures during the summer session, 
as recommended by the appropriate Ad- 
vancement Committee and approved by the 
Faculty Council. Depending on the type of 
remediation involved, students may be re- 
quired to register and pay a fee for the 
summer session. 

The performance of each student is re- 
viewed at the end of the first semester and 
at the end of the academic year by an 
Advancement Committee. At the end of the 
first semester, the Committee determines, 
on the basis of progress and/or final grades, 
whether the student is progressing satisfac- 
torily; if warranted, remediation, assignment 
to a special program (first or second-year 
students only) or dismissal may be recom- 
mended to the Faculty Council. 

Students assigned to a special program 
are placed under the supervision of the 
Special Academic Programs Committee, 
which tailors a program to the needs and 
abilities of each student and determines 
advancement or dismissal on the basis of 
progress and/or final grades at the end of 
each semester. Careful monitoring contin- 
ues until the student has demonstrated that 
he can assume a regular course load. All 
first and second-year courses must have 
been completed satisfactorily before the 
student may be advanced into the regular 
third year curriculum. 

At the end of the academic year, the 
appropriate Advancement Committee rec- 
ommends for each student either uncondi- 



tional advancement, probationary advance- 
ment, repeat of the year or academic 
dismissal to the Faculty Council, which must 
approve all Advancement Committee deci- 
sions. 

SPECIALLY TAILORED 
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

The Specially Tailored Educational Pro- 
gram (STEP) functions within the framework 
of the regular curriculum but allows students 
to spend up to three years completing the 
first and second-year courses. The program 
was developed for students who, because 
of academic difficulty, illness or other cir- 
cumstances, need special assistance and/ 
or additional time to fulfill the academic 
requirements. 

The First and Second Year Advancement 
Committees may offer a student the option 
of STEP or assign to STEP any student 
whose progress is unsatisfactory, if it is 
generally agreed that a reduced load and/ 
or special tutorial assistance may improve 
the student's chance of successfully com- 
pleting course requirements. 

Students assigned to STEP are placed 
under the supervision of the Special Aca- 
demic Programs Committee, which plans 
for each student a program suited to his 
particular needs and carefully monitors his 
progress. Departmental counselors in the 
basic sciences and preclinical sciences, as 
well as a study skills instructor, are available 
to assist any student assigned to STEP. 

Students may be advanced into the reg- 
ular program when they have demonstrated 
satisfactory progress; otherwise they remain 
in STEP until they have completed all first 
and second-year courses. Once the student 
is advanced into the regular program, his 
academic progress is evaluated by the 
appropriate Advancement Committee. 

THE MINIMESTER 

In the 1977-78 academic year the Dental 
School initiated a January minimester. Di- 
dactic courses offered to all students in the 
minimester are elective. Third and fourth- 
year students may participate only in those 
courses scheduled before 10:00 a.m., since 
the clinic continues to operate on the usual 
schedule during the minimester. 

Information concerning course offerings 
will be distributed to all students by the 
Office of Academic Affairs. 

19 



REQUIREMENTS FOR 
GRADUATION 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery 
is conferred upon a candidate who has met 
the conditions specified below. 

1) A candidate must have satisfied all 
requirements of the various depart- 
ments. 

2) A candidate must have achieved a 
minimum 2.0 average in fourth-year 
courses. 

3) The candidate must have paid all 
indebtedness to the University prior to 
graduation. 

Early Graduation 

The University of Maryland Dental 
School's early graduation program enables 
talented, conscientious students who have 
completed all requirements to be recom- 
mended by the faculty for graduation in 
January of the fourth year. 

This is not a special educational program. 
Students who qualify must have had edu- 
cational experiences comparable to those 
of students who will graduate in June and 
must have achieved at least the same 
degree of clinical proficiency. 

DRESS CODE 

Clinic jackets must be worn during all 
clinical dentistry and basic dental science 
laboratory procedures. Coats must be pur- 
chased prior to the first day of the academic 
year; incoming students usually arrange a 
group purchase of coats during the first 



week. Clinic jackets must conform to the 
following specifications: 

hip length, white, short sleeves 
conventional collar and lapel 
three buttonholes, white buttons 
three pockets: top left, bottom left, 
bottom right 
To allow for cleaning, students will need 
three coats in the first year, five coats in 
the second year and seven coats in the 
third and fourth years. 

Students are required to maintain a high 
level of personal hygiene and appearance, 
particularly in the dental clinics. Hair must 
be neatly combed; if the hair is shoulder 
length or longer, it must be tied up. Men 
are required to wear dress pants, shirt and 
tie under the clinic jacket; women, conven- 
tional attire or pants-suit uniform. Jeans, 
tennis shoes, sandals without hosiery, or 
other inappropriate casual attire may not be 
worn by either men or women. These guide- 
lines apply to all areas of the School, 
whether a patient is present or not. Excep- 
tions in non-patient care areas must be in 
writing from the discipline supervisor. 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

The budget guide below is provided as a 
reasonable approximation of average ex- 
penditures by students enrolled during 
1977-78. Estimates are for students living 
away from home; single students who live 
in University facilities will pay approximately 
$800 in housing fees for the 1977-78 aca- 
demic year. 

To these expenses must be added the 
costs of instruments, supplies and books. 



APPROXIMATE AVERAGE EXPENDITURES 



1977-78 
Single 

9 month 1 1 month 1 
Tuition and fees 

Resident $1895 $1895 

Non-Resident 3695 3695 

Health Insurance 168 168 

Food 1080 1320 

Lodging (includes utilities) 1 125 1375 

Clothing, laundry, incidentals 500 600 

Travel 450 550 

Personal 225 275 

* Third year and APT students 
20 



Married 
9 month 1 1 month' 



$1895 

3695 

335 

1440 

2025 

1000 

450 

450 



$1895 

3695 

335 

1760 

2475 

1200 

550 

550 



Instruments and Supplies 

Every student is required to provide his 
own instruments, except those for oral sur- 
gery. A complete list of essential instru- 
ments and materials for all courses is sup- 
plied to students. In order to ensure the 
lowest possible cost to the student as well 
as uniformity of quality and type, the school 
purchases these instruments in sealed kits 
at a quantity discount and passes the sav- 
ings on to students. Arrangements are 
made for instruments and materials to be 
delivered at the beginning of the term. Each 
student should purchase the prescribed 
items promptly. 

The costs of required instruments for the 
1977-78 session are listed below to provide 
a general indication of the expenditures 
involved. 

First Year $2249 

Second Year 1 827 

Third Year 490 

Fourth Year 100 

APT Program 

First Year 2658 

Second Year 1 25 

r extbooks 

The purchase of textbooks is not re- 
quired. A list of textbooks recommended for 
!first-year courses is mailed to incoming 
students during the summer prior to enroll- 
ment. Textbook lists for second, third and 
fourth-year courses are circulated at the 
•beginning of the academic year. The cam- 
pus bookstore stocks these books; students 
,may purchase books there or at other local 
bookstores. Approximate costs of textbooks 
and other instructional materials are as 
follows: 

First Year $300 

Second Year 300 

Third Year 200 

Fourth Year 50 



Remote Site Training 

A portion of the Dental Schools educa- 
tional program, perhaps involving students 
jin each year of the curriculum, may be 
accomplished at sites remote from the Den- 
tal School. It may be necessary for the 
additional costs (such as expenses for lodg- 
ing, meals and travel) incurred by the stu- 
dent for this remote site training to be 
borne by the student. 
I 



STUDENT JUDICIAL POLICY 
Professional Code of Conduct 

Dentistry is an exacting profession, de- 
manding the highest personal behavior from 
its practitioners. As a health professional, 
the dentist enjoys a high degree of public 
confidence and trust. He governs his own 
affairs, to a great extent, and has earned 
this privilege by successfully assuming the 
responsibility for his own conduct. In our 
society the health practitioner functions on 
the basis of self-discipline rather than im- 
posed regulation. Acceptance of this Code 
of Conduct represents the student's desire 
to fully prepare himself for the obligations 
of the dental profession. 

As traditionally expected of all health 
professionals, the student will demonstrate 
the highest standards of integrity at all 
times. As specific examples: 

• written and practical examinations 
must be accomplished in accordance 
with the specific instructions 

• any work submitted for evaluation (lab- 
oratory or clinical) must represent a 
student's own effort when required 

• there will be demonstrated, under all 
circumstances, a keen respect for the 
rightful ownership of equipment, instru- 
ments, facilities, books, supplies and 
personal belongings 

Any irregularities concerning professional 
conduct occurring inside or outside of the 
Dental School may be reported to the 
Chairperson of the Judicial Board (a special 
committee of the Faculty Council composed 
of faculty and students), who may refer the 
matter to the Judicial Board or other appro- 
priate persons. 

A copy of the Student Judicial Policy is 
distributed to all students upon matricula- 
tion. 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 
IN DENTISTRY 

The increased public demand for more 
and better oral health care creates an 
unprecedented climate for growth in the 
dental profession. 

Current dental graduates can anticipate 
initial annual net income on the average of 
$20,000 per annum. This income is contin- 
gent upon and can be affected by the area 
he/she serves, the practice specialty, and 
the state of the economy at the time. 



21 



Subject 



THE DENTAL CURRICULUM 
YEAR I 

Clock Hours 



Credits 



Semesters 
1 2 



Total 



Anatomy 255 255 13 

DANA 511 

Basic Dental Science 180 180 360 14 

DENT 511 

Biochemistry 90 90 5 

DBIC511 

Conjoint Sciences 45 45 3 

DCJS 512 

Microbiology 90 90 

DMIC512 

Oral Health Care Delivery 15 30 45 

OHCD511 

Physiology 90 90 

DPHS512 

540 435 

YEAR II 

Subject Clock Hours 

Semesters 
1 2 

Basic Dental Science 270 315 

DENT 521 

Biomedicine 90 105 195 

DPAT 521 

Conjoint Sciences 90 90 180 

DCJS 521 

Oral Health Care Delivery 15 30 45 

OHCD 521 

Pharmacology 90 90 

DPHR 521 



975 



48 



Credits 



Total 



585 



25 



12 



12 



555 540 1 095 



57 



22 





YEAR III 










Subject 


Clock Hours 




Credits 




Semesters 
1 2 


Total 




Conjoint Sciences 

DCJS 531 


30 




30 


60 


4 


Oral Diagnosis/Radiology 


30 




30 


60 


7 


DPAT 531 






Oral Health Care Delivery 


15 




30 


45 


6 


OHCD 531 






or 
OHCD 537 Special Studies (elective) 










(6) 


Oral Surgery 


15 




30 


45 


5 


DSUR 531 






Orthodontics 

ORTH 531 


15 




15 


30 


2 


Pediatric Dentistry 

PEDS 531 


15 




15 


30 


8 


Periodontics 

PERI 531 


15 




15 


30 


11 


Fixed Restorative Dentistry 

FIXD 531 


15 




15 


30 


13 


Removable Prosthodontics 


30 




15 


45 


8 


REMV 531 






Endodontics 

ENDO 531 


15 






15 


4 


Clinic 


360 


90 


360 


720 
90 




Minimester clinic hours 














555 


90 


555 


1200 


68 




YEAR IV 










Subject 


Clock Hours 




Credits 




Semesters 
1 2 


Total 




Conjoint Sciences 


120 






120 


6 


DCJS 541 






Clinic 

Minimester clinic hours 


405 


102 


360 


765 
102 


56 










525 


102 


360 


987 


62 



23 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



i. 




ANATOMY 

Chairman: Dr. D. Vincent Provenza 
Professors: Barry, Piavis, Provenza 
Associate Professors: Gartner, Hiatt, 

Meszler, Seibel 
Assistant Professor: Khan 
Instructor: Centola 
Lecturer: Lindenberg 

The basic course in human anatomy 
consists of a thorough study of the cells, 
tissues, organs and organ systems of the 
body from the gross, microscopic and de- 
velopmental aspects. Principles of body 
structure and function are studied with par- 
ticular emphasis on those concerned with 
the head, facial region, oral cavity and 
associated organs. Neuroanatomy deals 
with the gross and microscopic structure of 
the central nervous system and peripheral 
nerves with special attention to functional 
phases. Correlation is made with other 
courses in the basic science and clinical 
disciplines of the dental curriculum. 



DANA 511. Human Anatomy (13) 

FOR POSTDOCTORAL STUDENTS: 
DANA 514. The Anatomy of the Head 
and Neck (3) 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS: 
DANA 610. Human Embryology (4) 
DANA 611. Human Gross Anatomy (8) 
DANA 612. Human Neuroanatomy (4) 
DANA 614. Advanced Head and Neck 
Anatomy (3) 

DANA 615. Embryological Basis of Anat- 
omy (4) 

DANA 616. Experimental Embryology (4) 
DANA 617. Radiation Biology (4) 
DANA 618. Special Problems in the 
Anatomies (1-3) 

619. Seminar (1) 

620. Physical Methods in the 
Anatomies (4) 



DANA 
DANA 



DANA 621. Human Histology (6) 



24 



DANA 622. Mammalian Oral Histology 
and Embryology (2) 

DANA 633. The Anatomy of the Tempo- 
romandibular Joint (1) 

DANA 799. Master's Thesis Research 
(credit by arrangement) 

DANA 899. Dissertation Research (credit 
by arrangement) 



BASIC DENTAL SCIENCE 

Director: Dr. George Buchness 
Associate Professor: Buchness 
Assistant Professor: Thompson 
ptaff: All clinical departments 

Basic Dental Science is the administrative 
jnit directly responsible for teaching the 
fundamental principles, techniques and 
manual skills related to the practice of 
'dentistry during the first and second years 
Df the curriculum. Areas of instruction in- 
clude dental morphology and occlusion, pre- 
ventive dentistry, periodontics, dental mate- 
ials, instruments and equipment, operative 
jentistry, fixed partial prosthodontics, re- 
movable complete and partial prosthodon- 
:ics, endodontics, pediatric dentistry, ortho- 
jontics, oral surgery, oral diagnosis and 
•adiology. The instructional format includes 
tie use of lecture, laboratory projects, self- 
nstructional media, assigned reading, clini- 
:al assignments, and both written and prac- 
tical examinations. Course planning and 
presentation are coordinated by the Director 
and involve the cooperative effort of mem- 
bers of every clinical department. 

DENT 511. Basic Dental Science I (14) 
DENT 521. Basic Dental Science II (25) 



program of specialized training for graduate 
students seeking an advanced graduate 
degree (M.S., Ph.D.) in preparation for a 
career in teaching and research. 

The course provided for students study- 
ing for the Doctor of Dental Surgery degree 
covers the major traditional subjects of bio- 
chemistry. Dental students who have previ- 
ously taken a course in biochemistry may 
take a placing-out examination which, if 
passed satisfactorily, permits them to be 
excused from taking this course. The De- 
partment also participates in the conjoint 
sciences program of the dental curriculum. 

DBIC 511. Principles of Biochemistry (5) 

FOR POSTDOCTORAL STUDENTS: 
DBIC 512. Dental Biochemistry (2) 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS: 

DBIC 609. Seminar (1) 

DBIC 611. General Biochemistry for 
Graduate Students (4) 

DBIC 612. Biochemical Endocrinology (3) 

DBIC 613. Biochemistry of Lipids (2) 

DBIC 614. Biochemistry of Vitamins (2) 

DBIC 615. Nutrition and Energy Metabo- 
lism (2) 

DBIC 616. Biochemistry of Carbohy- 
drates (2) 

DBIC 708. Special Topics in Biochemistry 
(1-3) 

DBIC 709. Non-Thesis Research in Bio- 
chemistry (1-3) 

DBIC 799. Thesis Research (Master's; 
credit by arrangement) 

DBIC 899. Dissertation Research (Doc- 
toral; credit by arrangement) 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

chairman: Dr. John P. Lambooy 
D rofessors: Lambooy, Leonard 
Associate Professors: Bashirelahi, M. 

Morris 
Assistant Professors: Benveniste, Courtade 

Biochemistry is a study of life's processes 
n terms of molecular structure of food 
substances and body constituents. The De- 
triment has two teaching goals: to present 
i course in comprehensive biochemistry to 
he first-year students seeking a profes- 
sional degree in dentistry; and to provide a 



CLERKSHIP PROGRAM 

Two elective clerkship programs allow 
selected fourth-year students to pursue fur- 
ther studies in departmental activities spe- 
cially designed to meet their needs and 
interests. Students devote a portion of their 
clinic time to these specialized programs; 
the remaining clinic time is spent in the 
comprehensive treatment of patients in the 
regular program. Clerkships are available in 
both basic science and clinical disciplines. 



DCJS 546. 
DCJS 547. 



Clerkship II (elective) 
Clerkship I (elective) 



25 



CLINICAL DENTISTRY 

Staff: All clinical departments 

The clinical program is designed to pro- 
vide the student with a broad background 
of clinical experience based on the philoso- 
phy of prevention and comprehensive pa- 
tient care. Although the need for the treat- 
ment of existing disease is of paramount 
importance, the clinical program stresses 
those aspects of complete dental care 
which are founded on preventing the occur- 
rence or recurrence of disease. Each sec- 
ond, third and fourth-year dental student is 
assigned his/her own "dental office" where 
each treats patients in a manner similar to 
the general practitioner in the community. 
Clinical areas for undergraduate instruction 
are designated as general practice clinics 
and teaching is accomplished using teams 
of general dentists and specialists working 
together to provide interdepartmental in- 
struction for the student and the highest 
level of dental care for the patient. The 
clinical program functions each month of 
the year in order to provide continuity of 
patient care. 



CONJOINT SCIENCES 

Coordinator, Conjoint Sciences I 

Dr. George N. Krywolap 
Coordinator, Conjoint Sciences II 

Dr. Norbert R. Myslinski 
Coordinator, Conjoint Sciences III 

Dr. Stewart A. Bergman 
Coordinator, Conjoint Sciences IV 

Dr. Todd Beckerman 
Staff: All departments 

The program in conjoint sciences is struc- 
tured to bring together all biologic and 
clinical sciences in an effort to impress 
upon the student the importance of sound 
knowledge in all phases of the art and 
science of dentistry. Problems of clinical 
significance form the basis of subject mate- 
rial for the program. Every department, 
where appropriate, contributes its expertise 
to the understanding and solution of the 
problem. Courses in the conjoint sciences 
focus on broad areas of instruction, with 
the first and second years more heavily 
oriented toward the basic sciences and the 
third and fourth years more directly related 
to general and special clinical problems. 



In the first year important features of 
human growth and development are em- 
phasized, especially the clinical implications 
of normal and abnormal oro-facial develop- 
ment. The second year program traces the 
development of caries and periodontal dis- 
ease, concentrating on diagnosis, treatment 
and prevention. In the third year the man- 
agement of oral conditions associated with 
a broad spectrum of patient types is consid- 
ered, with special emphasis on drugs and 
their clinical application. The curriculum In 
Conjoint Sciences IV includes a required 
unit on practice administration and a wide 
range of elective course offerings. 

A special unit on cardiopulmonary resus- 
citation is incorporated into this program, 
as well as comprehensive instruction in the 
control of apprehension and pain. In addi- 
tion, didactic instruction concerning the 
treatment of special patients is synthesized 
into all four years of the conjoint sciences. 

DCJS 512. Conjoint Sciences I (3) 

DCJS 521. Conjoint Sciences II (12) 

DCJS 531. Conjoint Sciences III (4) 

DCJS 541. Conjoint Sciences IV (6) 



DENTAL CARE FOR THE 
HANDICAPPED 

Acting Director, Special Patient Program: 
Dr. Arthur L. Hayden 

This program is provided to teach dental 
students the fundamentals of providing care 
for handicapped children and adults. The 
didactic portion includes information on the 
nature of handicapping conditions and their 
effects on the patient, and on the clinical 
management of patients with handicapping 
disorders. The didactic phase utilizes inde- 
pendent learning resources, augmented 
with scheduled faculty review. During the 
third and fourth years, students provide 
care for handicapped patients in the Special 
Patient Clinic, a facility specifically designed 
and operated for this purpose. Students 
also obtain limited experience in hospital 
dentistry. 

The program emphasizes the special 
needs of the handicapped that must be 
considered in order for diagnostic, preven- 
tive and corrective dental services to be 
provided. 



26 



EDUCATIONAL AND 
INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES 

Chairman: Dr. James F. Craig 
D rofessor: Moreland 
Associate Professor: Craig 
instructor: Grefsheim 
Research Instructor: Perez 
Associate Staff: Kichi 

The Department of Educational and In- 
structional Resources has as its primary 
objective the implementation of a compre- 
hensive instructional development program 
embracing all areas of the dental curricu- 
um. Such a program applies the principles 
of management to the process of education 
and is designed to maintain a constant 
"ocus on the quality of the education being 
orovided students pursuing a career in den- 
tistry or dental hygiene. Facilities include a 
olosed-circuit color television system and 
graphic and photographic support area for 
he development of media in a variety of 
ormats. The Department's staff is readily 
available for assistance to the faculty in the 




design and development of independent 
learning materials for the dental curriculum, 
or for consultation regarding media applica- 
tions in a variety of educational settings. 

The Department also maintains an Inde- 
pendent Learning Center (ILC) which 
houses 100 study carrels specifically for 
the use of self-instructional media by stu- 
dents. The ILC is available for utilization 
from morning through early evening hours 
on weekdays and Saturdays, and provides 
a spacious and comfortable atmosphere for 
independent study. 

Additionally, the Department endeavors 
to provide the dental practitioner the oppor- 
tunity to continue his education by making 
available a variety of instructional materials 
in an independent learning format. 



ENDODONTICS 

Chairman: Dr. James L. Gutmann 
Associate Clinical Professors: Andrews, 

August, Schunick 
Assistant Professors: Gutmann, Hovland 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Anton, S. 

Cohen, Fields, Goode, Goodfriend, 

Jurist, Klein, Levinson, Lovdahl, 

Mattocks, Rupprecht, Spott 
Clinical Instructors: Burt, Goodman, Levine, 

Nipper 

The student's introduction to endodontics 
begins in the second year as part of Basic 
Dental Science II. It consists of a series of 
lectures and laboratories which stress the 
fundamentals of root canal therapy. Upon 
successful completion of this course the 
student is ready to perform the same pro- 
cedures on clinical patients who warrant 
this treatment. 

In the third year another series of lectures 
emphasizing diagnosis and the manage- 
ment of more difficult situations is pre- 
sented. Following these lectures the student 
should be able to treat a greater variety of 
problems without seeking assistance. 

The fourth-year experience in endodon- 
tics is primarily clinical. However, endodon- 
tic surgery and special problems in endo- 
dontics are discussed in a number of 
lectures as part of Conjoint Sciences IV on 
an elective basis. 

ENDO 531. Endodontic Diagnosis and 

Treatment (4) 
ENDO 541. Endodontics (4) 



27 



FIXED RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY 

Chairman: Dr. Alvan M. Holston 

Professor: Greeley 

Associate Professors: Carr, Diaz, Haroth, 

Mastrola 
Associate Clinical Professors: Finagin, M. 

Graham 
Assistant Professors: Binkley, Bradbury, 

DiGianni, Gingell, Holston, Kuhlke, 

Somers, G. Williams, Wood 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Abraham, 

Goldberg, Iddings, Livaditis, 

VandenBosche 
Instructors: B. Jeffrey, Kinderknecht, 

Nelson 
Clinical Instructors: H. Cohen, Dietrich, 

Kahn, Kaminski, B. Katz, Kondrat, Lewis, 

Roth, Sanidad, Santacroce 
Associate Staff: Britt, Suls 

The scope of instruction in fixed restora- 
tive dentistry involves the art and science 
of replacing missing teeth and lost or dis- 
eased tooth structure with fixed (non-remov- 
able) restorations; the disciplines of opera- 
tive dentistry and fixed partial prosthodontics 
are included. The undergraduate teaching 
program is integrated throughout the four- 
year curriculum. 

The Department of Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry is responsible for major segments 



of the courses in basic dental science, in 
which students are introduced to fundamen- 
tal principles and develop the manual skills 
necessary for clinical treatment of patients. 
The first-year program includes methods 
and materials used to restore individual 
teeth, and an understanding of the destruc- 
tive process of dental caries and the pre- 
ventive aspects of restorative treatment. 
Second-year students are introduced to 
concepts and skills used in replacement of 
missing teeth with fixed partial prostheses. 
Instructional methodology includes lectures, 
television demonstrations, slide tape in- 
structional manual programs and laboratory 
exercises on simulated human dentition. 
During the first two years, limited clinical 
patient treatment with close staff supervi- 
sion augments and reinforces the founda- 
tion provided. 

During the third and fourth years, didactic 
instruction and extensive clinical treatment 
with staff guidance facilitate the application 
and integration of fundamentals of operative 
dentistry and fixed partial prosthodontics. 
The Department also participates in the 
conjoint sciences program. 

FIXD 531. Fixed Restorative Dentistry 

(13) 
FIXD 541. Fixed Restorative Dentistry 

(15) 




28 



MICROBIOLOGY 



ORAL DIAGNOSIS 



Chairman: Dr. Donald E. Shay 
Professors: Shay, Krywolap 
Associate Professors: Chang, Delisle, 

Falkler, Sydiskis 
Assistant Professors: Minah, Nauman 
Special Lecturers: Hawley, Jansen, 

Joseph, Libonati, Oryshkevych, Snyder 

The Department of Microbiology offers 
undergraduate and graduate programs. The 
undergraduate program is organized in such 
a way as to supply the student with the 
fundamental principles of microbiology in 
order that he may understand the chemical 
and biological mechanisms of the produc- 
tion of disease by bacteria and other para- 
sites, and the means by which the host 
protects itself against bacteria and related 
organisms. The graduate programs leading 
toward the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy are designed to 
'train students for positions in research and 
'teaching, particularly in dental schools. 

DMIC 512. Microbiology (5) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES: 
DMIC 401. Pathogenic Microbiology (4) 
DMIC 451. Serology Immunology (3) 
DMIC 452. Virology (3) 
DMIC 453. Mycology (3) 
DMIC 454. Parasitology (3) 

c OR GRADUATE STUDENTS: 
'DMIC 600, Chemotherapy (1,1) 

601. 
DMIC 609. Special Problems in Microbi- 
ology (1-3) 
DMIC 611. Public Health (2) 
.'DMIC 612. Bacterial Fermentations (2) 
DMIC 621. Advanced Dental Microbiology 

and Immunology (4) 
^DMIC 624. Microbiology of the Periodon- 
tium (2) 
DMIC 630. Experimental Virology (4) 
DMIC 634. Viral Oncology (2) * 
DMIC 635. Bacterial Genetics (4) 
DMIC 650, Advanced General Microbiol- 

651. ogy (4, 4) 
DMIC 653. Techniques in Microscopy (4) 
DMIC 689. Seminar (1) 
DMIC 710. Microbial Physiology (4) 
DMIC 799. Thesis Research (Master's; 

credit by arrangement) 
DMIC 899. Dissertation Research (Doc- 
toral; credit by arrangement) 



Chairman: Dr. C. Daniel Overholser 
Professors: Hasler, Olson 
Clinical Professor: Brotman 
Associate Professor: Park 
Associate Clinical Professor: Bloom 
Assistant Professors: Aks, Charles, 

Garrison, Kutcher, Oksas, Overholser, 

Peterson 
Assistant Clinical Professors: E. Levin, 

McKinnon, McWilliams, Vandermer 
Instructors: Curl, Meiller 
Clinical Instructors: Benson, Caden, 

Chester, DePaola, Johnson, N. Katz, 

Scheitler, Steiner, Weiner 
Special Lecturers: Applefeld, Beverly, 

Booth, Braun, O. Johnson, Leveque, 

Spicer 

Oral diagnosis consists of the basic prin- 
ciples of the patient interview, the funda- 
mentals of physical examination, recognition 
of oral disease and the management of 
patients with oral and/or systemic disease. 

Principles of Biomedicine, an interdiscipli- 
nary course taught in conjunction with the 
Department of Oral Pathology, introduces 
the second-year student to oral diagnosis 
through didactic presentations concerning 
the patient interview, clinical examination, 
oral radiology and treatment planning. Clini- 
cal aspects of the course are introduced 
through Basic Dental Science. 

Principles of oral diagnosis are taught in 
the third and fourth years clinically and 
didactically. These courses reinforce the 
concept that the dentist should receive ad- 
equate training in obtaining medical histo- 
ries, performing limited physical examina- 
tions, interpreting the results of various 
laboratory tests and, most importantly, relat- 
ing the physical status of the patient to the 
dental treatment plan. 

DPAT 521. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 
DPAT 531. Principles of Oral Diagnosis/ 

Radiology (7) 
DPAT 541. Principles of Oral Diagnosis/ 

Radiology (4) 

ORAL HEALTH CARE DELIVERY 

Chairman: Dr. Thomas L. Snyder 
Associate Professors: Morganstein, 

Roseman 
Associate Clinical Professors: Drabkowski, 

Rutter, M. Sachs, Shulman 



29 



Assistant Professors: Bers, Bonito, Dana, 
DeRenzis, Hayden, Kleinman, Snyder, 
Soble 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Maddox, 
Webb 

Instructors: R. Jeffrey, Morse 

Clinical Instructors: B. Graham, Pascal, K. 
Sachs 

Special Lecturers: Bushel, Dent, Donnelly, 
Fahey, Fales, Freedman, Gillespie, 
Hillsman, Inman, Kushner, Lovett, 
Matanoski, Reeves, Rogers, P. 
Wei n stein 

In its teaching, research and service ac- 
tivities the Department of Oral Health Care 
Delivery is committed to the development, 
evaluation and dissemination of methods 
for assessing and meeting the oral health 
needs of the population in ways that are 
efficient, effective, and acceptable to both 
the providers and the recipients of care. 

The primary teaching areas are (1) dental 
care delivery, (2) behavioral sciences and 
management, and (3) preventive dentistry/ 
epidemiology. During the four-year curricu- 
lum, the student participates in lectures, 
seminars, small group experiences and a 
clinical program. Field experiences and spe- 
cial projects are interwoven into the curricu- 
lum to support the didactic presentations. 
Specific topics of instruction include: a sur- 
vey in oral health care, and an introduction 
to human behavior, management and pre- 
ventive dentistry in the first year; basic 
principles of work simplification, four-handed 
dentistry (DAU), human behavior and com- 
munications in health in the second year; 
personnel management, business systems, 
preventive dentistry/community health, den- 
tal delivery systems and four-handed den- 
tistry clinic (DAU) in the third year; ex- 
panded function dental delivery system 
clinic (TEAM) and dental management ap- 
plications in the fourth year. The curriculum 
in the Department of Oral Health Care 
Delivery utilizes a building block approach. 
Basic concepts and principles provided dur- 
ing the first two years are amplified and 
reinforced in the third and fourth years. The 
clinical program, in years three and four, 
correlates and demonstrates delivery sys- 
tem principles and alternatives utilizing pre- 
ventive dentistry, behavioral and modern 
management concepts. An instructional unit 
concerning the development of a dental 
practice, presented in Conjoint Sciences IV, 



30 



is coordinated by faculty of the Department 
of Oral Health Care Delivery. 

OHCD 511. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 

OHCD 521. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 

OHCD 531. Oral Health Care Delivery (6) 

OHCD 541. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 

ORAL PATHOLOGY 

Chairman: Dr. Martin Lunin 

Professor: Lunin 

Associate Professors: Beckerman, B. Levy, 

Swancar 
Assistant Professor: Arafat 

The undergraduate teaching program 
consists of an interdisciplinary course that 
covers the basic principles of pathology 
and medicine through presentation of the 
morphologic, chemical and physiologic 
changes of basic disease processes and 
important specific diseases. Emphasis is 
placed on the diagnosis, etiology, pathogen- 
esis and clinical manifestations of disease 
processes in the oral cavity. The aim is to 
provide a sound basis for the differential 
diagnosis of oral lesions and a rationale for 
their treatment. The student is provided 
ample opportunity to develop proficiency in 
problem solving in oral diagnosis. A variety 
of techniques for examination and diagnosis 
are covered, including dental radiography. 

A graduate program is offered for stu- 
dents desiring specialty or research training. 

DPAT 521. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS: 

DPAT 612, Special Problems in Oral 

Pathology (2, 2) 

Histopathology Techniques 

(4,4) 

Advanced Histopathology of 

Oral Lesions (3, 3) 

Seminar (1,1) 



613. 
DPAT 614, 

615. 
DPAT 616, 

617. 
DPAT 618, 

619. 
DPAT 799. 



Research (Master's; credit by 
arrangement) 
DPAT 899. Research (Doctoral; credit by 
arrangement) 



ORAL SURGERY 

Chairman: Dr. McDonald K. Hamilton 
Professors: DeVore, Hamilton 
Clinical Professor: Cappuccio 
Associate Professors: Bergman, Tilghman 



Assistant Clinical Professors: Hourigan, 

Kogan 
Instructors: Cameron, Smith 
Special Lecturer: Helrich 

Introductory lectures in minor oral sur- 
gery, preclinical laboratory in oral surgery 
and lectures and demonstrations in local 
anesthesia are given during the first and 
second semesters of the second year by 
departmental participation in Basic Dental 
Science II. Third-year lectures involve all 
phases of oral surgery and general anes- 
thesia. Students are rotated to the Oral 
Surgery Clinic in block assignments during 
the second, third and fourth years for pro- 
gressive participation in oral surgical proce- 
dures. Fourth-year students are assigned 
v to University Hospital for operating room 



experience and for general anesthesia ex- 
perience; they also take night calls with the 
Oral Surgery resident. The Department par- 
ticipates in three years of the conjoint sci- 
ences program. 

DSUR 531. Oral Surgery (5) 
DSUR 541. Oral Surgery (5) 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS: 
DSUR 601. Clinical Anesthesiology (6) 
DSUR 602. Advanced Anesthesiology (3) 
DSUR 605. Surgical Anatomy (3) 
DSUR 609. Special Problems in Oral Sur- 
gery (credit by arrangement) 
DSUR 620. General Dental Oral Surgery 

(4) 
DSUR 621. Advanced Oral Surgery (4) 
DSUR 799. Research (credit by arrange- 
ment) 



, 




ORTHODONTICS 



PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 



Chairman (Acting): Dr. John M. Grewe 
Professor: Grewe 
Clinical Professor: Swinehart 
Assistant Professors: Stein, R. Williams 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Bonebreak, 

Dunn, Higginbottom, E. Morris, Sardana, 

Schoenbrodt, Scornavacca, Sweren 
Clinical Instructors: Gordon, Greenwald, 

Rynarzewski, Trepp 
Special Lecturers: Christiansen, Frazier, 

Hamlet, Niswander 
Associate Staff: Kreutzer 

The program of instruction in orthodontics 
is divided into three phases. Phase one 
consists of departmental participation in lec- 
tures on growth and development presented 
in Conjoint Sciences I and preclinical labo- 
ratory exercises presented in Basic Dental 
Science II. The second phase consists of 
didactic instruction in orthodontics designed 
to prepare the student to anticipate and 
detect incipient malocclusions; provide ap- 
propriate and interceptive preventive meas- 
ures where necessary; recognize conditions 
which require referral for comprehensive 
orthodontic care; and use orthodontic prin- 
ciples as an adjunct to treatment proce- 
dures in other phases of dental practice. 
The third phase includes clinical experi- 
ences in orthodontic evaluation, diagnosis 
and treatment of minor malocclusions, 
space management and habit control. 

ORTH 531. Orthodontics (2) 
ORTH 541. Orthodontics (2) 





Chairman (Acting): Dr. Preston G. Shelton 

Clinical Professor: Kihn 

Associate Professors: Owen, Shelton, 

Wagner 
Associate Clinical Professors: Balis, 

Schulz, J. Weinstein 
Assistant Professors: Bakker, Biederman, 

Minah 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Canion, Coll, 

S. Levin, O'Riordan 
Special Lecturers: Landis, Thunberg 

The student is introduced to the perform- 
ance of dentistry for children by means of 
lectures and laboratory projects presented 
in Basic Dental Science and Conjoint Sci- 
ences. Didactic instruction consists of a 
series of lectures. Particular attention is 
devoted to diagnosis and treatment plan- 
ning, preventive dentistry procedures includ- 
ing fluoride therapy, nonpunitive patient 
management techniques incorporating the 
use of psychopharmacologic agents, treat- 
ment of traumatic injuries to the primary 
and young permanent dentition, restorative 
procedures in primary teeth, pulpal therapy 
and interceptive orthodontics. Emphasis is 
focused upon diagnostic procedures and 
the treatment of incipient malocclusions in 
the primary and mixed dentitions. 



PEDS 531. 
PEDS 541. 



Pediatric Dentistry (8) 
Pediatric Dentistry (6) 



32 




PERIODONTICS 

Chairman: Dr. John J. Bergquist 
Professors: Bergquist, Bowers, Pridgeon 
Clinical Professors: Halpert, Sobkov, 

Zupnik 
Associate Professor: Ratliff 
Associate Clinical Professors: Livingston, 

Plessett, Winson 
Assistant Professors: Allen, Hayduk 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Barber, 

Burks, Chmar, Daley, Eskow, Goldman, 

Golski, Kihara, Lever, Nurin 
Instructors: Morton, Walker 
Clinical Instructors: Bradshaw, Dober, 

Eisenberg, Feldman, llchyshyn, Perez- 

Febles, Sindler, Zeren 
Associate Staff: Organ 

Students are introduced to fundamental 
Deriodontics in lectures during the first and 
second years; clinical experience begins 
late in the second year. In the third year 
'students have didactic exposure to ad- 
vanced periodontal procedures. Third and 
: ourth-year students enter into a learning 
contract that delineates a set of basic mini- 
jnum clinical experiences. Interested stu- 
dents have the opportunity to choose from 
la broad range of additional experiences 
;and to contract for both additional experi- 
9nce and the grade the student feels these 
sxperiences warrant. Thus, the individual 
student has substantial involvement in es- 
ablishing his educational goals. 

=>ERI 531. Periodontics (11) 
^ERI 541. Periodontics (11) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Chairman: Dr. Raymond M. Burgison 

Professors: Burgison, Rudo 

Clinical Professor: Dolle 

Associate Professor: Thut 

Assistant Professors: Crossley, Myslinski 

The program of instruction in pharmacol- 
ogy is divided into three phases. The first 
Dhase includes a thorough study of basic 
concepts and principles in pharmacology 
jsing mainly prototype drugs. Emphasis is 
)laced on the mechanism of action of 
Irugs, their absorption, distribution, metab- 
)lism, excretion, toxicity and drug interac- 
ions. The second phase deals with clinical 
aspects of oral and nutritional therapeutics 
and control of pain and anxiety, presented 
n the conjoint sciences program. Special 



attention is given to clinically useful drugs, 
their indications and contraindications. The 
third phase, designed for graduate and 
postdoctoral students, is an in-depth cover- 
age of current topics in general pharmacol- 
ogy, biotransformation of drugs, molecular 
pharmacology, pharmacology of local and 
general anesthetics, and dental toxicology. 

DPHR 521. General Pharmacology and 
Therapeutics (5) 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS: 

DPHR 606. General Pharmacology and 
Therapeutics (6) 

DPHR 616. Biotransformation of Drugs 
(3) 

DPHR 619. Dental Pharmacology Semi- 
nar (1) 

DPHR 626. Molecular Pharmacology (3) 

DPHR 636. Pharmacology of Anesthetic 
Drugs (3) 

DPHR 656. Dental Toxicology and Ther- 
apeutics (2) 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Chairman: Dr. John I. White 
Professor: White 
Associate Professor: Kidder 
Assistant Professors: Bennett, Burke, 

Nardell 
Assistant Research Professors: Buxbaum, 

Staling 

The Department of Physiology offers both 
undergraduate and graduate programs. The 
undergraduate course stresses the basic 
principles of physiology and provides the 
student with knowledge of the function of 
the principal organ systems of the body. 
Dentally-oriented aspects of physiology are 
taught through departmental participation in 
the conjoint sciences program. The Depart- 
ment also presents courses for postgrad- 
uate students and offers graduate programs 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy for students inter- 
ested in careers in teaching and research. 

DPHS 512. Principles of Physiology (5) 

FOR POSTDOCTORAL STUDENTS 
DPHS 551. Clinical Physiology (3) 
DPHS 568. Special Topics in Oral Physi- 
ology (1) 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS: 
DPHS 611. Principles of Mammalian 
Physiology (6) 



33 



DPHS 618. Advanced Physiology (1) 

DPHS 628. Research (1-2) 

DPHS 799. Masters Thesis Research 
(credit by arrangement) 

DPHS 899. Doctoral Dissertation Re- 
search (credit by arrange- 
ment) 

REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS 

Chairman: Dr. Robert J. Leupold 
Professors: Jerbi, Leupold, Ramsey 
Associate Professors: DeSai, Fenster, 

Fetchero, Reese, Rodgers, Quarantillo 
Associate Clinical Professor: Choudhary 
Assistant Professors: Elias, Wagley 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Mort, 

Schwartz 
Associate Staff: Baier, King, Rutherford 

Removable prosthodontics concerns the 
arts and sciences involved in replacing lost 
dental and associated structures by means 
of removable artificial substitutes. These 
substitutes are designed and constructed to 
restore and maintain function, appearance, 
speech, comfort, health and the self-image 
of the patient. The program of instruction is 
divided into three phases consisting of de- 
partmental participation in Basic Dental Sci- 
ence II, didactic instruction in the effective 
management of clinical prosthodontic pro- 
cedures, and clinical treatment of dental 



patients under the guidance of staff mem- 
bers. 

REMV 531. Removable Prosthodontics 

(8) 
REMV 541. Removable Prosthodontics 

(8) 

SENIOR DENTAL EXTERNSHIP 

The senior dental externship is designed 
to provide an opportunity for selected stu- 
dents to provide patient care in private 
dental offices with established dental practi- 
tioners, who serve as preceptors. The stu- 
dent spends from four to twelve weeks of 
the summer between the third and fourth 
years in the program. This educational ex- 
perience is designed to allow students to 
observe and participate in the operation of 
a dental practice; to encourage practitioner- 
student interchange concerning concepts in 
dentistry; and to develop the student's in- 
sight into the role of the general practitioner, 
including his relationship with other health 
professionals, community health resources 
and the community at large. Several of the 
preceptors selected for participation in the 
program are located in rural and remote 
communities of Maryland, where the extern | 
may additionally learn more about the deliv-j 
ery of dental care in underserved and non-i 
urban settings. 




34 



ACCELERATED PROFESSIONAL 
TRAINING PROGRAM (APT) 




«*j0* % 



... 




\ 



APT is an accelerated curriculum de- 
igned to satisfy the requirements for the 
».D.S. degree in three calendar years. The 
eduction in time is accomplished primarily 
\ the following ways: 

1) Restructuring of traditional courses by 
integration of subject matter to dem- 
onstrate correlations between basic 
science and clinical topics 
! 2) Selection of course content based 
upon clinical relevancy 

3) Adoption of self-instructional methods 
reinforced by seminar discussions and 
close faculty support 

The APT Program is limited to ten stu- 
dents per class. Students are selected on 
jhe basis of good college performance, 
setter than average Dental Admissions Test 
xores, and a high level of maturity and 
notivation. These criteria have been suc- 
cessfully used to select classes since 1972. 
'he Program's first class was graduated in 
lune, 1975, having met or surpassed ex- 
)ectations. The students' early introduction 
d clinic patients helps to produce well- 
ounded general dentists, astute in diagno- 



sis and treatment planning as well as skilled 
in technical procedures. 

COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 

Director: Dr. James R. Swancar 
Professor: Olson 

Associate Professors: Haroth, Swancar 
Assistant Professor: Gingell 

(Consultative assistance as well as basic 
teaching support is provided by basic sci- 
ence and clinical departments in the regular 
program.) 

The general objectives of the first-year 
courses are to provide the background in 
basic sciences essential to dental practice, 
knowledge of the most prevalent dental 
diseases, and training in basic forms of 
therapy; and to introduce the student to 
clinical practice. 

The second year builds upon the teaching 
of basic sciences through an integrated 
course of clinical physiology and medicine. 
The student continues to apply basic princi- 
ples of therapy while being introduced to 
more advanced methods. 



35 



The third (senior) year is devoted to the 
achievement of competency in all clinical 
disciplines. The student's background is 
broadened by the addition of courses in 
pharmacology, less common oral diseases, 
delivery systems for oral health care; and a 
comprehensive diagnosis and treatment 
planning seminar. 



YEAR I 

DAPT 500. Essentials of Human Biology 
(4) 
A general study of the cells, tissues, 
organs and organ systems of the body 
from the gross, microscopic and applied 
functional aspects, as well as integrated 
material on basic human physiology and 
biochemistry. 

DAPT 501. Oral Health Care Delivery (2) 
An introduction to oral health care deliv- 
ery and consideration of the human fac- 
tors in dentistry; pre-clinical experience in 
dental assistant utilization. 

DAPT 502. Radiology (3) 
The basics of the science of ionizing 
radiation, production of x-rays, and the 
various techniques of dental roentgenog- 
raphy including the processing, viewing 
and interpretation of films. 

DAPT 503. Mechanisms of Disease (3) 
The basic mechanisms of pathology and 
the basic tenets of microbiology se- 
quenced in the curriculum to provide a 
background for the discussion of caries 
and periodontal disease. 

DAPT 504. Stomatognathology (11) 
The gross, microscopic and functional 
anatomy of the head, facial region, oral 
cavity and associated organs (temporo- 
mandibular articulation). Also included are 
a study of the embryology of facial and 
dental organ systems as well as a study 
of dental occlusion. 

DAPT 505. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 
A series of lectures covering the diagno- 
sis, treatment planning and rationale for 
each procedure involved in the fabrication 
of a complete prosthodontic appliance. 
Clinical experience, which allows the stu- 
dent to apply the knowledge of proce- 
dures acquired in lectures, is also pro- 
vided. 



DAPT 506. Clinical Dental Science (3) 
Practical experience in various laboratory 
procedures and in the use of dental 
materials. 



DAPT 507. Diagnosis and Treatment 
Planning (2) 
The methods of history taking and patient 
examination; clinical and laboratory aids; 
and the principles to be followed in arriv- 
ing at a diagnosis, prognosis and rational 
plan of treatment. 

DAPT 510. Dental Caries (3) 
The diagnosis, etiology, pathogenesis, 
epidemiology and prevention of dental 
caries with emphasis upon the correlation 
of basic science disciplines and their 
clinical significance in caries. 

DAPT 511. Periodontics I (4) 
A study of gingival and periodontal dis- 
ease including the clinical and histopath- 
ologic findings, etiologic factors and meth- 
ods of prevention. The rationale for 
treatment is included with an introduction 
to treatment techniques. 

DAPT 512. Restorative Dentistry (8) 
The basics of intracoronal restorative pro- 
cedures including diagnosis and treat- 
ment planning, and pulpal responses to 
these procedures. The student has an 
opportunity to perform these procedures 
in the laboratory; when competency in 
the laboratory has been demonstrated, 
the procedures are performed on pa- 
tients. 



DAPT 513. Anesthesia and Pain Control 

(3) 

The neurophysiology and anatomy rela- 
tive to local anesthesia and pain control 
The techniques of dental local anes- 
thesia, the pharmacology of anesthesia; 
agents as well as the use of pre- anc 
post-anesthetic agents are included. 



DAPT 51 4. Physiologic Pathology ( 1 3) 
An interdisciplinary course consisting of 
anatomical, physiological and pathologi- 
cal considerations of systemic disease. 



DAPT 515. Clinical Dentistry (5) 
An introductory clinical experience for 
first-year students consisting predomi- 
nantly of complete denture construction 
In addition, students who have demon 
strated competency in anesthesia and 






if 



36 



restorative techniques may begin treating 
restorative patients. 

EAR II 

APT 520. Fixed Restorative Dentistry 

(20) 
The techniques and theory of fixed pros- 
thodontic restorations. Students perform 
these procedures in the laboratory prior 
to initiating their clinical experience. 

'APT 521. Removable Prosthodontics 

(15) 
Presentation of the theory and practice 
of removable partial prosthodontics and 
; ; continuation of the clinical application of 
,' removable prosthodontics. 

IAPT 522. Endodontics (8) 
The theory and practice of endodontics. 
Following the laboratory procedures, stu- 
dents begin performing these procedures 

c on patients in the clinic. 

MPT 523. Pediatric Dentistry (6) 
I A study of the procedures and techniques 
used in pediatric dentistry, with special 
emphasis on preventive procedures, pa- 
tient management and the treatment of 
handicapped children. 

MPT 524. Orthodontics (4) 

A comprehensive study of this specialty, 
I with particular emphasis on the study of 
. growth and development and the tech- 
niques and theories involved in cephalo- 
metric diagnosis. 

>APT 525. Periodontics II (20) 
A continuation of DAPT 511 including the 
techniques of periodontal therapy with 
emphasis on treatment techniques which 

: are applicable in general dental practice. 

: The course stresses clinical experience 
in periodontal therapy techniques. 

>APT 527. Oral Surgery (7) 
Surgical principles, oral surgical instru- 
ments and their application, multiple ex- 
tractions, and alveoloplasty as well as 
medical emergencies. 

)APT 530. Diagnosis and Radiology (9) 
Application of the principles of diagnosis, 
treatment planning and radiology in a 
clinical environment. 

>APT 531. Oral Health Care Delivery (4) 
I Principles of epidemiology and manage- 
j ment of dental practice plus experience 
in four-handed dentistry clinic (DAU). 



YEAR III 

DAPT 540. Oral Pathology (8) 
A general outline of diseases occurring 
within the oral cavity as well as the oral 
manifestations of systemic diseases. 

DAPT 541. Clinical Pharmacology (2) 
The mechanism of action, metabolism, 
excretion, indications, contraindications 
and drug interactions of clinically useful 
drugs. 

DAPT 542. Oral Health Care Delivery (4) 
The clinical portion consists of assign- 
ment to expanded function delivery sys- 
tem clinic (TEAM). A didactic portion, 
entitled "Practice Development," is of- 
fered within the Conjoint Sciences IV 
portion of the regular undergraduate pro- 
gram. 

DAPT 543. Seminar (10) 
The Senior Seminar involves students in 
a comprehensive utilization of knowledge 
gained in the first two and one-half years 
of experience through the review of ad- 
vanced cases and the formulation of 
complex treatment plans. Learning is en- 
hanced by class discussions that include 
peer evaluation. 

DAPT 550. Fixed Restorative Dentistry 
(10) 
An extension of the clinical experiences 
in DAPT 520. 

DAPT 551. Removable Prosthodontics (6) 
An extension of the clinical experiences 
in DAPT 505 and 521. 

DAPT 552. Endodontics (4) 
A continuation of the clinical experiences 
in DAPT 522. 

DAPT 553. Pediatric Dentistry (5) 
A continuation of DAPT 523. 

DAPT 554. Orthodontics (3) 
A continuation of the clinical experiences 
in DAPT 524. 

DAPT 555. Periodontics III (12) 
The clinical continuation of DAPT 511 
and 525. 

DAPT 556. Oral Surgery (5) 
The clinical continuation of DAPT 527. 

DAPT 557. Diagnosis and Radiology (5) 
The clinical continuation of DAPT 530. 



37 



THE DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM 




GENERAL INFORMATION AND 
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Dental School offers a baccalaureate 
degree program in dental hygiene, as well 
as a postcertificate program for registered 
dental hygienists who have completed a 
two-year accredited dental hygiene program 
and are interested in completing the require- 
ments for a baccalaureate degree. A total 
of 124 credits are required for the Bachelor 
of Science degree in dental hygiene. 

Completion of a two-year preprofessional 
curriculum at one of the three University of 
Maryland campuses (College Park, Balti- 
more County or Eastern Shore) or at an- 
other institution, is required for eligibility to 
apply for enrollment as a junior-standing 
student in the Dental School on the Balti- 
more campus. 

For registered dental hygienists, comple- 
tion of a two-year accredited dental hygiene 

38 



program, completion of all required pre 
professional courses, and a minimum of 
one year of clinical experience as a dental 
hygienist are required for eligibility to apply 
for enrollment as a senior-standing studenl 
in the Dental School on the Baltimore cam 
pus. 

Enrollment as a predental hygiene stu 
dent or a registered dental hygienist t< 
complete preprofessional curriculum re- 
quirements at any University of Marylan 
campus does not guarantee admissior 
to the dental hygiene program on the 
Baltimore campus. Enrollment in bot 
programs is limited. 

The first two years, constituting the pre 
professional curriculum, include general ec 
ucational requirements of the University o 
Maryland, dental hygiene education accre 
ditation requirements and elective lowe 
division courses in one of the recommende 
minor areas of study. 



A suggested sequence for required 
courses in the preprofessional segment of 
the curriculum follows. It is the student's 
responsibility to become familiar with 
courses available to fulfill these require- 
ments. Therefore, it is imperative that the 
student meet with a dental hygiene advisor 
AT LEAST once each semester. 

Although courses may be interchanged dur- 
ing the first two years, it is recommended that 
chemistry precede microbiology and nutrition 
to facilitate its application to these two sub- 
jects. It should be noted that General Zoology 
101 is a prerequisite for Human Anatomy and 
Physiology (Zoology 201, 202) at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

The student should select lower division 
elective courses that would serve as pre- 
requisites for upper division courses in a 
minor that students will complete their senior 
year. Minors may be selected from any of the 
following areas of study: education, psychol- 
ogy, sociology, hearing and speech, nutrition, 
biological sciences, or dental public health. 

It is also possible for a student to complete 
predentistry requirements in lieu of a specific 
minor. The dental hygiene faculty will advise 
students in the selection of courses for one of 
the recommended minors. 




Freshman Year 


Credits 


Sophomore Year 


Credits 




1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 




1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 


English Composition . 
Inorganic Chemistry . . 
'Organic Chemistry . . . 

General Zoology 

General Psychology . . 

General Sociology . . . 

Public Speaking 

"Humanities 


3 

4 

4 
3 


4 

3 
3 
6 


'Human Anatomy & 

Physiology 

'Microbiology 

Principles of Nutrition . . 

'"Social Science 

"Humanities 

Electives 


4 
4 

3 

3 


4 

3 
3 
3 
3 


Total 


.. 14 


16 


Total 


. 14 


16 



"These courses must include a laboratory and meet the requirements for science 

majors. Survey or terminal courses for nonscience majors are not acceptable for 

transfer. 
''HUMANITIES: Courses must be selected from at least three of the following areas: 

literature, philosophy, history, fine arts, speech, math or language. 
"'SOCIAL SCIENCES: General psychology and sociology are required; the remaining six 

credits should be selected from courses in psychology, sociology, government and 

politics, economics or business administration. 



39 



DENTAL HYGIENE CURRICULUM 

The professional curriculum involves 
coursework at the Dental School and upper 
division electives in the student's minor. In 
the junior year, students are provided with 
basic knowledge and skills in the delivery 
of dental hygiene care. During this year 
students learn about normal and abnormal 
head, neck and intraoral structures; the 
etiology and clinical appearance of various 
systemic and dental disease processes; 
and preventive and therapeutic dental hy- 
giene care. To enhance their educational 



experience, students are introduced to pa- 
tient care very early in the professional 
curriculum. 

The senior year of the professional curric- 
ulum is devoted to advanced clinical patient 
care experiences as well as in-depth didac- 
tic information in the art and science of 
dental hygiene. In addition, students take 
elective courses in a minor which must be 
related to some form of dental hygiene 
practice. 

A typical sequence for the junior and 
senior years follows: 



Junior Year 



Credits 



Senior Year 



Credits 



1st 
Sem. 



2nd 
Sem. 



1st 2nd 
Sem. Sem. 



DHYG 330 

Oral Biology 7 

DHYG 331 

Oral Pathobiology 6 

DHYG 333 
Prevention & Control of 

Oral Diseases 

DHYG 334 
Methods & Materials in 

Dentistry 

DHYG 335 

Principles of Dental 

Hygiene 

DHYG 336-7 
Patients & the 

Community 3 

DPHR 332 
General Pharmacology 
& Therapeutics 



Total 



16 



17 



DHYG 340-1 

Advanced Clinical 

Practice 5 5 

Upper Division Electives in 

Minor 9 9 

Elective (upper and lower 

division) 3 

Total 17 14 



Optional elective courses offered by the 

Department of Dental Hygiene: 
DHYG 348-9 

Dental Hygiene Practicum 3 3 

DHYG 350-1 
Pain and Anxiety 

Control 1 1 

DHYG 352-3 
Pediatric Dentistry 

Practicum 2 2 

Dental Public Health 
Minor* (limited 
enrollment): 
DHYG 454-5 

Dental Public Health 3 3 

DHYG 456-7 
Dental Public Health 
Practicum 3 3 



* A total of 12 credits will be offered by the Department of Dental Hygiene. The remaining 
6 credits necessary to complete the dental public health minor may be taken at UMBC 
or College Park in subject areas related to public health, with the approval of the 
Department of Dental Hygiene. 



40 



POSTCERTIFICATE CURRICULUM Predental Hygiene Students 



The postcertificate curriculum provides for 
registered dental hygienists an opportunity 
, to pursue advanced course work in prepa- 
ration for broadened career opportunities in 
I teaching, public health or research. Stu- 
j dents must complete all degree require- 
] ments, including electives in a minor related 
. to a specialized area of dental hygiene 
" practice, in courses offered at the Dental 
School and other University of Maryland 
I campuses. 



ADMISSIONS AND APPLICATION 
PROCEDURES 

Students are considered for admission to 
i the University of Maryland Dental School 
without regard for race, color, creed or sex. 
It is the objective of the School to enroll 
highly qualified students with diversified 
backgrounds in order to make the educa- 
tional experience more meaningful for each 
individual as well as to provide dental health 
practitioners to all segments of the commu- 
nity. 

Qualified men and women, including 
< members of ethnic minority groups, are 
encouraged to apply for admission to the 
I dental hygiene program. 

All students who are offered admission 
will be required to submit a deposit of $100 
along with a letter of intent to enroll. The 
deposit will be credited toward tuition when 
the student registers, and will not be re- 
funded in the event of failure to enroll. 



High School Students 

High school students who wish to enroll 
in the predental hygiene curriculum should 
request applications directly from the Ad- 
missions Office of the University of Mary- 
land, College Park, Maryland 20742; the 
University of Maryland Baltimore County, 
5401 Wilkens Avenue, Catonsville, Mary- 
land 21228; or the University of Maryland 
Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 
21853. 

It is recommended that those preparing 
for a baccalaureate degree program in den- 
tal hygiene pursue an academic program in 
high school which includes courses in biol- 
ogy, chemistry, math and physics. 



Predental hygiene students who have 
completed three semesters of the pre- 
professional curriculum should request an 
application at the end of the third semester 
from the Director of Admissions and Regis- 
trations, Room 132, Howard Hall, University 
of Maryland at Baltimore, 660 West Red- 
wood Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201; or 
from the dental hygiene advisor on the 
College Park or Baltimore County campus. 
Applications for the Baltimore campus 
should be received no later than Febru- 
ary 1 prior to the fall semester for which 
the student wishes to enroll. 

All applicants will be required to submit 
Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test (DHAT) 
scores. Information concerning the DHAT is 
available from the dental hygiene advisor 
on the College Park and Baltimore County 
campuses or from the Dental School's Den- 
tal Hygiene Department. At the discretion 
of the Dental Hygiene Admissions Commit- 
tee, applicants may also be required to 
appear for a personal interview. All potential 
applicants should meet regularly with the 
dental hygiene advisor on the College Park 
or Baltimore County campus. A minimum 
average of C in the preprofessional curricu- 
lum is required and preference may be 
given to those students who have main- 
tained high scholastic averages. 



Registered Dental Hygienists 

Registered dental hygienists who have 
completed a two-year accredited dental hy- 
giene program, as well as one year of 
clinical experience as a dental hygienist, 
should contact the dental hygiene advisor 
on the College Park campus, Room 2109 
Turner Lab, College Park, Maryland 20742, 
in order to determine the number of trans- 
ferable credits and the number of additional 
preprofessional and lower division elective 
courses necessary for eligibility to apply for 
the postcertificate program. If all preprofes- 
sional curriculum requirements have not 
been fulfilled, the student should apply for 
enrollment at one of the three University of 
Maryland campuses. If the preprofessional 
curriculum has been completed, the student 
should apply to the dental hygiene program 
no later than February 1 prior to the fall 
semester for which the student wishes to 



41 



enroll. At the discretion of the Dental Hy- 
giene Admissions Committee, the applicant 
may be asked to appear for an interview. 

Applicants should note that enrollment in 
the postcertificate program at the Dental 
School is limited. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree 
must complete general education require- 
ments, dental hygiene prerequisites in the 
preprofessional curriculum, dental hygiene 
course requirements at the Dental School, 
and elective courses in a minor area of study 
totaling 18 semester credit hours of upper 
division courses. Residency requirements 
stipulate that the last 30 semester credits be 
taken at the University of Maryland. Academic 
progress, attendance and financial obligation 
will be governed by the policies of the Dental 
School. Students must complete a total of 124 
credits and will be awarded a Bachelor of 
Science degree by the University of Maryland. 



STANDARDS FOR 
PROFESSIONAL APPEARANCE 

Students are required to maintain a high 
level of personal hygiene and a professional 
appearance. Clinical attire required by the 
Department of Dental Hygiene includes 
white regulation uniform, white hose, shoes 
and laces (no clogs or open-heeled shoes) 



for women students; white clinic jacket, 
dark slacks, short-sleeved shirt and necktie, 
dark shoes and socks for men. 

In the laboratory, a buttoned laboratory 
coat must be worn over street clothes. 
Classroom attire consists of street dresses 
or pants outfits for women; dress pants and 
shirt for men. Students are expected to 
abide by the dress code regulations and to 
purchase uniforms through a specified 
source. 

Additional information and regulations are 
detailed in a clinic manual distributed to all 
students. 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

To assist students with their financial 
planning, the budget guide below is pro- 
vided as a reasonable approximation of 
average expenditures by students enrolled 
during 1977-78. Students who will not be 
living at home and who are unable toi 
secure University housing should allow ap- 
proximately $1100 for lodging (including 
utilities). These estimates do not include 
food, travel and personal expenses. 

A portion of the dental hygiene program, 
perhaps involving students in both years of 
the professional curriculum, may be accom- 
plished at extramural sites. It may be nec- 
essary for the additional costs (such a* 
expenses for meals and travel) incurred b> 
the student for this extramural site training 
to be borne by the student. 



APPROXIMATE AVERAGE EXPENDITURES 

1977-78 

Junior Year 
Tuition 

In-State $ 620.00 

Out-of-State 2,050.00 

Dormitory, double occupancy 755.00 

Instruments/Supplies 570.00 

Uniforms and Shoes 80.00 

Textbooks 330.00 

Health Insurance 1 68.00 

Miscellaneous fees: 

Application, graduation, dues, instructional resources, 

supporting facilities, student health and malpractice 150.00 

TOTALS 

In-State $2,673.00 

Out-of-State $4,103.00 

42 



Senior Year 

$ 620.00 

2,050.00 

755.00 

75.00 

20.00 

50.00 

168.00 



210.00 



$1,898.00 
$3,328.00 



EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 
IN DENTAL HYGIENE 

Although the majority of dental hygienists 
are employed in private dental offices, there 
are opportunities for those with baccalau- 
reate and graduate degrees in dental hy- 
giene education; community, school and 
public health programs; private and public 



institutions; commissioned service in the 
Armed Forces; research; and other special 
areas of practice. 

Current dental hygiene graduates, work- 
ing full-time, can anticipate initial annual 
income in the range of $12,000 to $15,000, 
depending on the area, type of practice 
and general economic conditions. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 




Chairperson: Ms. Cheryl T. Metzger 
p rofessor: Hasler (Supervising Dentist) 
Clinical Professor: Sobkov 
Assistant Professors: Forrest, Metzger, 

Talbott 
instructors: Everett, Hardland, Keene, G. 

Levy, Mulford, Parker, Radebaugh, 

Rubinstein 
Clinical Instructor: Rabin 

MOTE: Lectures and instructional assist- 
ance are provided in many courses by the 
chairman and/or faculty of other depart- 
ments in the Dental School. 

3HYG 330. Oral Biology (7) 
The concepts of embryology, histology, 
anatomy and physiology with emphasis 
on the head, neck and oral cavity. Mor- 
phologic characteristics and physiologic 
relationships of teeth and supporting tis- 
sues; and an introduction to the principles 



and procedures of clinical techniques with 
emphasis on the preliminary diagnostic 
work-up, the oral prophylaxis, patient ed- 
ucation, and other preventive services. 

DHYG 331. Oral Pathobiology (6) 
The nature, occurrence and etiology of 
general and oral pathologic entities and 
abnormalities with major emphasis on the 
oral cavity; radiology concepts including 
radiation safety, techniques for exposing 
and processing radiographs, and detec- 
tion of pathologic conditions; the basic 
concepts and techniques for determining 
hard and soft tissue health status, dental 
caries, periodontal disease, malocclusion, 
oral cancer, stains and accretions, and 
factors to consider before providing clini- 
cal dental hygiene services; and the clini- 
cal application of principles and proce- 
dures for the prevention and control of 
oral diseases. 



43 



DPHR 332. General Pharmacology and 
Oral Therapeutics (3) 
Essentially the same course material as 
DPHR 521, dental curriculum. 

DHYG 333. Prevention and Control of 
Oral Diseases (6) 
The principles and procedures for the 
prevention of oral disease including den- 
tal health education, oral hygiene meas- 
ures, dietary control of dental disease, 
use of fluorides, sealants, and the oral 
prophylaxis; and advanced study of the 
etiology and control of periodontal dis- 
ease and oral prophylaxis techniques. 

DHYG 334. Methods and Materials in 
Dentistry (3) 
Introduction to the science of dental ma- 
terials, including the composition and uti- 
lization of dental materials as they apply 
to clinical dental hygiene procedures, 
dental assisting and patient education; 
introduction to dental specialties and their 
relationship to dental hygiene practice; 
and the elements of dental assisting and 
office procedures. 

DHYG 335. Principles of Dental Hygiene 
Practice (2) 
The history of dentistry and dental hy- 
giene; the principles of ethics and juris- 
prudence; the philosophy, development 
of and current trends in dental auxiliary 
education and utilization; and professional 
development as it relates to the role of 
organized dentistry, continuing education, 
evaluation of scientific literature and re- 
search contributions. 

DHYG 336-7. Patients and the Commu- 
nity (3-3) 
The elements of human behavior, princi- 
ples of learning and methods of teaching 
as they relate to patient education; the 
principles of community or public dental 
health including social and political factors 
affecting dentistry, the responsibilities of 
the dental profession in the community, 
and participation in community health ac- 
tivities; the basic principles of communi- 
cating with individuals and groups, public 
speaking, public relations (including pub- 
lic information); and the use of audiovis- 
ual aids. 



44 



DHYG 340-1. Advanced Clinical Practice 
(4-4) 
Senior year clinic and seminar for the 
application of all knowledge and princi- 
ples necessary for the practice of dental 
hygiene. Major emphasis is given to pre- 
ventive periodontics and patient educa- 
tion. Students work closely with dental 
students to provide additional orientation 
to auxiliary utilization. 

DHYG 348-9. Dental Hygiene Practicum 
(optional; 3-3) 
The integration of upper division elective 
courses in the student's minor with a] 
special area of dental hygiene clinical 
practice, teaching, community dental 
health, or research. 

DHYG 350-1. Pain and Anxiety Control 
(optional; 1-1) 
An elective didactic course in the phar- 
macology and use of local anesthesia 
sedatives and other tools for control o* 
pain and anxiety during dental proce- 
dures. 

DHYG 352-3. Pediatric Dentistry Practi- 
cum (optional; 2-2) 
An elective course to provide advancec 
didactic knowledge and clinical skill ir 
the management of preventive denta 
treatment of child patients. 

DHYG 410-11. Seminar in Dental Hy 

giene (postcertificate only 
3-3) 
Reinforcement and updating of clinic 
dental hygiene skills; public health, re 
search design, teaching, administration 
management and preventive dentistry. 

DHYG 454-5. Dental Public Health (op- 
tional; 3-3) 
Current issues surrounding the preser 
health care delivery system and concept 
of health care management are intrc 
duced. Topic areas include financing 
quality assurance, the role of the feder. 
government, geriatric care, the role of th 
manager, functions in the manageri; 
process, grantsmanship and accounting 

DHYG 456-7. Dental Public Health Prac- 
ticum (optional; 3-3) 
The student spends eight hours per wee; 
working in the community in such area; 
as program planning, implementation arl 
evaluation. This course must be takei 
concurrently with DHYG 454-5. 






ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS 




*^fc^ W 






; GRADUATE EDUCATION 

Graduate programs leading to the Master 
of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy 
;l(Ph.D.) degrees are offered by the Depart- 
ments of Anatomy, Biochemistry, Microbiol- 
ogy, Oral Pathology and Physiology. A 
^Master of Science degree is offered by the 
^Department of Oral Surgery and is de- 
scribed under Advanced Specialty Educa- 
tion. 

Programs are also available for those 
i;who wish to pursue a graduate degree in 
tjjone of the basic sciences concurrently with 
^clinic specialty education. The combined 
i degree/specialty training program generally 
•"ji! requires three years for the Master's degree 



and five years for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. These programs are highly indivi- 
dualized and are developed according to 
the needs and wishes of the candidate. 



The Baltimore campus Graduate School 

Bulletin and application for admission may 

be obtained from the Office of the Dean for 

..Graduate Studies and Research, University 

jjof Maryland at Baltimore, 624 West Lom- 

1 ]bard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 



i 



2 




ADVANCED SPECIALTY 
EDUCATION 

Assistant Dean for Advanced Specialty 
Education: Dr. Wilbur O. Ramsey 

The University of Maryland Dental 
School, recognizing its obligation to the 
state of Maryland and to the nation to 
educate competent specialists in all areas 
of clinical dentistry, has had since 1970 a 
full program of specialty education in which 
all disciplines are represented. 

The Dental School provides advanced 
specialty education leading to eligibility for 
specialty board certification in the following 
areas: endodontics, oral surgery, orthodon- 
tics, pediatric dentistry, periodontics and 
prosthodontics. All programs meet accredi- 
tation requirements of the Commission on 
Accreditation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary 
Educational Programs of the Council on 
Dental Education of the American Dental 
Association. Students successfully complet- 
ing any of these programs are awarded a 
certificate by the University of Maryland 
Dental School. 



45 



Those matriculating in the clinical spe- 
cialty programs are registered as special 
students in the Graduate School of the 
University and will receive credit for gradu- 
ate courses included in their specialty edu- 
cation. Students are required to show proof 
of professional liability insurance. 

The specialty programs are all developed 
with a balance between the biologic sci- 
ences and advanced clinical instruction. The 
facilities of the Dental School, School of 
Medicine, University of Maryland Hospital, 
and other related institutions of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland at Baltimore are used for 
didactic as well as clinical instruction. In 
addition, facilities for research are available 
in the departments in which the students 
are enrolled or in other related departments. 

All applicants must have a D.D.S. or 
D.M.D. degree or equivalent and give evi- 
dence of high scholastic achievement. A 
brochure describing all specialty programs 
may be obtained from the Assistant Dean 
for Advanced Specialty Education. Applica- 
tions for the oral surgery program should 
be requested from the Chairman of the 
Department of Oral Surgery; applications 
for all other programs, from the Assistant 
Dean for Advanced Specialty Education. 



ENDODONTICS 

The program is designed to prepare the 
candidate for clinical practice, teaching and 
research in endodontics. It meets the re- 
quirements for specialty training of the 
American Board of Endodontics. The pro- 
gram encompasses twenty-four months of 
full-time instruction beginning in July. The 
significant relationship between the basic 
biologic sciences and the clinical practice 
of endodontics is emphasized. The biologic 
and clinical sciences are integrated for pres- 
entation over the entire training period in 
order to better relate these two areas. In 
addition, courses in other clinical, social 
and behavioral sciences are included in 
order to broaden the knowledge and devel- 
opment of the student. 

ENDO 568. Endodontic Seminars (1-6) 
The dental pulp and the periapical struc- 
tures are the major topics under which 
the physiology, microbiology, pathology 
and biochemistry of these tissues are 
discussed in depth and interrelated. This 



46 



enables the student to formulate firm 
foundations for his diagnostic and treat- 
ment principles. Other seminar series 
deal with endodontic treatment planning, 
endodontic diagnosis, endodontic mate- 
rials, and a thorough and critical review 
of the literature directly and indirectly 
related to endodontics. 

ENDO 569. Clinical Endodontics (1-6) 
The development of clinical expertise is 
gradually evolved by introducing the stu- 
dent to a wide variety of situations of 
varying complexity. The student has the 
primary responsibility for the selection of 
either non-surgical or surgical proce- 
dures, based on certain criteria and with 
the guidance of a member of the faculty. 
After the student has demonstrated his 
competence in clinical as well as surgical 
procedures, supervision and advice are 
available as desired. The student is en- 
couraged to exercise independence and 
pursue situations as he sees fit. 

ENDO 579. Special Problems in Endodon- 
tics (1-6) 
This course primarily consists of inde- 
pendent research. In addition specific 
seminars, such as research orientation, 
protocol preparation, and the preparation 
of papers for publication, are presented 
in order to guide the student through his 
research project. The goal of this course 
is the completion of a research project 
suitable for publication. 



ORAL SURGERY 

A thirty-six to forty-eight month educa 
tional program leading to eligibility for ex- 
amination by the American Board of Oral 
Surgery is offered; a Master of Science 
degree is offered as an option. The firs 
year of the program is a residency in ora 
surgery at the University of Maryland Hos 
pital. Two first-year residents are selectee 
annually. First-year residents are assignee 
to an on-call, nightly and weekend schedule 
on a rotating basis. In addition to clinica 
oral surgery in a large metropolitan teachino 
hospital, first-year residents participate i 
oral surgery, oral pathology, and oral sun 
gery-orthodontic conferences, and have 
four-month assignment with the Departmer 
of Anesthesiology. During the summer bel 
tween the first and second years, the 



« 






divide their time between clinical teaching 
jof oral surgery in the Dental School, an 
assignment to the Shock-Trauma Unit of 
University Hospital, and vacation. The sec- 
ond year of the program is a second-year 
-esidency at the University of Maryland 
Hospital and Dental School. Graduate in- 
struction in head and neck anatomy, ad- 
vanced oral pathology, clinical pathology, 
ohysical diagnosis, pharmacology, physiol- 
ogy and microbiology is offered. Second- 
/ear residents participate in undergraduate 
dental student instruction during the aca- 
demic year in the Oral Surgery Clinic in the 
Dental School. In addition, they are intro- 
duced to major oral surgery procedures in 
;the operating room. The third year is a 
[welve-month residency at the University of 
Maryland Hospital and other affiliated hos- 
pitals. Residents are responsible for super- 
vising first and second-year residents and 
.assume responsibility for care of hospital- 
zed patients. Residents rotate on a three- 
month basis to University of Maryland Hos- 
oital, Baltimore City Hospitals, Mercy Hos- 
Dital and Provident Hospital. They also 
•spend one month on the Maxillo-Facial 
oervice of Hospital de Empleado in Lima, 
Peru. During the third year, students partic- 
ipate in all conferences held by the Depart- 
ment and receive advanced instruction in 
bral surgery. Research is considered an 
important factor and all trainees are ex- 
pected to complete an original research 
oroject. 




ORTHODONTICS 

The program in orthodontics is designed 
to prepare a qualified dental graduate for 
the practice of orthodontics and meets the 
requirements for specialty training of the 
American Board of Orthodontics. The 
twenty-three month program, which begins 
in July of each year, is planned to provide 
both clinical experience and essential didac- 
tic theory. In addition to orthodontic courses 
within the Department, courses and semi- 
nars are given by other faculty within the 
Dental School and the University of Mary- 
land. Students are also required to attend 
seminars at other universities and the Na- 
tional Institutes of Health. Research activity 
is an integral part of the educational pro- 
gram in orthodontics. Students are required 
to initiate and complete an original and 
independent investigation. 

ORTH 568. Orthodontic Seminars (1-7) 
Lectures, seminars and discussions ac- 
quaint the student with the basic technical 
aspects of orthodontics and the correla- 
tion between technical and clinical proce- 
dures and cephalometrics. Case presen- 
tations and lectures on topics of clinical 
interest relate to the students' cases and 
clinical experiences. 

ORTH 569. Clinical Orthodontics (1-6) 
The student is given experience in diag- 
nosis, patient management and treatment 
methodology, and develops mechanical 
skills from exposure to a wide range of 
malocclusion types among clinic patients. 

ORTH 579. Special Problems in Ortho- 
dontics (1-6) 
The role of genetics in orthodontics and 
theoretical mechanics are presented to or- 
thodontic students. Orthodontic diagnosis 
and recent advances in the field of or- 
thodontics are discussed from a review of 
pertinent literature, which also acquaints 
the student with the wide range of clinical 
orthodontic theory. A research project is 
conducted and reported in manuscript form 
by all orthodontic students. 

Seminars, laboratory demonstrations 
and case discussions are presented to 
provide instruction in orthodontic theory, 
diagnosis and treatment problems essen- 
tial to the training of postdoctoral students 
in periodontics, prosthodontics, pediatric 
dentistry and oral surgery. 



47 



PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 

The pediatric dentistry program is of 
twenty-four months' duration and meets the 
requirements for specialty training of the 
American Board of Pedodontics. The major 
sites of training include the Dental School 
and its affiliated hospitals, the John F. 
Kennedy Institute [an affiliate of The Johns 
Hopkins University] and the Maryland 
School for the Blind. Each student is re- 
quired to take a minimum of 30 hours of 
academic courses during his specialty edu- 
cation. These are offered by the Dental 
School and the other component schools of 
the University of Maryland at Baltimore. 

Individual private operatories, a depart- 
mental library, seminar room and laboratory 
facilities are available for the exclusive use 
of students. In addition, extensive training 
is provided in major facets of pediatrics, 
child psychiatry, pharmacology and otolar- 
yngology in the Schools of Medicine and 
Pharmacy. As an educational medium, each 
student is required to pursue and complete 
an original research project. 

PEDS 568. Pediatric Dentistry Seminars 
(1-6) 
In lectures, seminars and laboratory ex- 
ercises, students receive orientation to 
pediatric dentistry; discuss and evaluate 
the significance of literature on an as- 
signed reading list; receive orientation to 
and instruction in preventive, interceptive 
orthodontic treatment, and appliance ther- 
apy guiding the developing occlusion. 
Additional seminars focus on current de- 
velopments in pediatric dentistry and re- 
lated areas from a review of current 
literature. Guest lecturers and assigned 
topics are also utilized. 

PEDS 569. Clinical Pediatric Dentistry (1- 
6) 
In the first year, the student renders 
pediatric dental care in the postdoctoral 
clinic under the supervision of an attend- 
ing pediatric dentist. During the summer 
session and second year, the student is 
required to treat children presenting com- 
plex and/or advanced dental health prob- 
lems. The student perfects skills in diag- 
nosis and treatment planning, restorative 
dentistry, behavioral and medical man- 
agement, preventive procedures and in- 
terceptive orthodontics. 



PEDS 579. Special Problems in Pediatric 
Dentistry (1-6) 
Each postdoctoral student will: 

• design, initiate and complete a lim- 
ited research project 

• receive training and experience in 
providing comprehensive dental re- 
habilitation in a hospital operating 
room to patients under general 
anesthesia 

• work at a special pediatric clinic 
such as cleft palate, cardiac, etc.; 
discuss results of dental examina- 
tions with the medical staff to deter- 
mine optimum health for the child 

• spend six months in full-time attend- 
ance at the John F. Kennedy Insti- 
tute for the Habilitation of the Men- 
tally and Physically Handicapped 
Child, assuming all clinical duties in 
the Dental Department 

• teach, with supervision, pediatric 
dentistry to undergraduates during 
the second year of training 



PERIODONTICS 

The program in periodontics is designed 
to provide special knowledge and skills 
beyond the accepted D.D.S. or D.M.D, 
training so that, upon completing the pro- 
gram, students will be prepared to expertly! 
perform all skills of the specialty. In additions 
to achieving the highest level of proficiency! 
and knowledge in periodontics, the student: 
will be capable of producing new knowl 
edge, capable of transmitting knowledge 
and sensitive to the oral health care needs 
of the population. 

In order to afford sufficient time to fulfil 
these objectives, the specialty program is 
twenty-four months in duration. The firs 
year of training emphasizes the biomedica 
sciences as related to the specialty; th 
second year concentrates more specifically 
on the clinical phase of periodontics an 
the application of these biomedical concept* 
and principles. Students also gain experi 
ence in student teaching and clinical re 
search. 

Upon successful completion of the pre 
gram, students are awarded a certificat< 
which qualifies him/her to practice and 
teach in the specialty of periodontics and t< 
apply for examination by the Americai 
Board of Periodontology. 



48 




=>ERI 568. Periodontics Seminars (1-6) 
Seminars, discussions and guest lectur- 
ers are utilized to develop student skills 

? in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment 
planning. Students become familiar with 
periodontal literature for purposes of cri- 
tique, research methodology and content. 
Joint seminars are conducted to focus 

J attention on the interrelationship of perio- 

gj dontics to all fields of dentistry. 

PERI 569. Clinical Periodontics (1-6) 

t Students develop skills which will permit 

i them to become proficient in the treat- 

1 ment of all categories of patients with 

I periodontal disease, including those with 

r systemic-related problems. Students de- 

(I velop a rationale of treatment and gain 

$ experience in all current, therapeutically 

i acceptable, periodontal modalities of pa- 

' tient care. 

PERI 579. Special Problems in Periodon- 
tics (1-6) 
j Students gain experience in the formula- 
tion, development, institution, interpreta- 
| tion, reporting and defense of a research 
., investigation. They likewise acquire ex- 
,i perience in student teaching and effective 
■j communication and become proficient in 
the clinical recognition of pathological en- 
tities within the region of the oral cavity. 
Seminars are conducted to introduce stu- 
dents to practice management. 



PROSTHODONTICS 

The twenty-four month program in pros- 
tiodontics is designed to provide the stu- 



dent with advanced education in the clinical 
practice of fixed and removable prosthodon- 
tics based on sound biologic principles. A 
core of biologic science courses is pre- 
sented in conjunction with clinical disciplines 
directly related to the specialty of prostho- 
dontics. Graduate course work in oral pa- 
thology, oral histology, microbiology, physi- 
ology, pharmacology, and head and neck 
anatomy is correlated with special clinical 
programs in surgery, occlusion, periodon- 
tics, the temporomandibular joint and max- 
illo-facial prosthesis. The program meets 
the requirements for specialty training of 
the American Board of Prosthodontics. 



REMV 568. Prosthodontic Seminars (1-6) 
Prosthodontic seminars provide a forum 
for interchange and evaluation of infor- 
mation between students and faculty con- 
cerning clinical practices, clinical con- 
cepts and pertinent scientific literature. 
Among the instructional devices utilized 
are round-table discussions, case pres- 
entations, reports and critique of litera- 
ture, preparation and presentation of lit- 
erature abstracts, lecture and structured 
reading assignments. 

REMV 569. Clinical Prosthodontics (1-6) 
The clinical prosthodontic program is de- 
signed to provide a comprehensive expe- 
rience in the diverse phases of prostho- 
dontics: fixed partial denture, removable 
partial denture, complete denture and 
maxillo-facial prosthesis. The interdiscipli- 
nary requirements of prosthodontic treat- 
ment are emphasized. Opportunity is pro- 
vided for a concentration of the student's 
time in an area of special interest; how- 
ever, this concentration of time must be 
secondary to his mastery of the broad 
field of prosthodontics. 

REMV 579. Special Problems in Prostho- 
dontics (1-6) 
This section of the prosthodontic program 
consists of course work in subjects rele- 
vant to and supportive of clinical prostho- 
dontic practice, research and teaching. 
These courses, in conjunction with elec- 
tive subjects, permit a student to structure 
his postdoctoral program to serve his 
individual interests. A research project is 
required. 



49 



CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Associate Dean for Continuing Education 
and Alumni Affairs: Dr. Charles T. Prid- 
geon 

Assistant Director of Continuing Education 
and Alumni Affairs: Dr. Robert W. Haroth 

The Dental School conducts a formalized 
program of continuing education that pro- 
vides structured educational experiences 
beyond basic preparation for the profession. 
It includes educational activities that update, 
refresh and reinforce the professional 
knowledge and skill of the practitioner. An 
average of fifty courses of one or more 
days' duration are made available during 
each academic year for dentists and dental 
auxiliaries. The clinical, biological, social 
and behavioral sciences related to practice 
are included in the course offerings. The 
courses are conducted by the School's 
faculty, visiting faculty and distinguished 
practitioners from all sections of the country. 



Clinical and laboratory facilities and a 
spacious classroom specifically designed 
and equipped for the continuing education 
program are available for courses held at 
the School. Off-campus courses are also 
provided for practitioners located in rural 
areas of the state. 

In addition to the traditional lecture format 
of instruction, a study club program has 
been established. This program allows the 
practitioner to attend meetings of a group 
of his choice at the School and to pursue 
his professional interests and needs in eve 
ning sessions, with no interruption to a 
daily practice. 

Self-instruction is also available in the 
School's Independent Learning Center and 
at satellite learning centers in four commu 
nity colleges and a Veteran's Administration 
hospital. 

Students are invited and encouraged tc 
attend continuing education courses at nc 
cost on a space-available basis. 




STUDENT LIFE 




( )FFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Office of Student Affairs is either 
jirectly or indirectly involved with all aspects 
if student life and welfare at the Dental 
pehool. Primary areas of responsibility in- 
clude academic, personal and career coun- 
seling; financial aid; and advisory services. 
| Students who experience financial, health, 
agal, employment, housing and other per- 
onal problems are counseled by the As- 
istant Dean for Student Affairs and referred 
s necessary to the appropriate campus 

I.gency or office. In addition, counseling 
oncerning specialty training, military serv- 
;e, internships, dental education and dental 
esearch careers is available to undergrad- 
uate dental students. 
I The Assitant Dean for Student Affairs 

Ierves as advisor to all student organiza- 
ons and publications; he also assists in 
he coordination of joint student-faculty 
>rofessional, social and cultural programs, 
or which the Student Affairs Committee of 
|rte Faculty Council has the major responsi- 
>ility. 

The Office of Student Affairs maintains 
lirect liaison with administrators as well as 
'.ampus, community and professional 
>rganizations and agencies for the effective 
onduct of all student affairs. 



OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

The Office of Academic Affairs is the 
source of student information concerning 
the academic program and the repository 
for records of student academic perform- 
ance. 

A major function of the Office is coordi- 
nating the academic counseling and guid- 
ance programs of the School. Departmental 
academic counseling and progress reports 
are maintained and monitored. Records 
concerning counseling, referrals and dispo- 
sition are maintained and serve as a re- 
source to the faculty and administration for 
purposes of academic evaluation. 

Textbook lists, course schedules, exami- 
nation schedules and the academic calen- 
dar are disseminated through this Office. 
Program information distributed to students 
includes handouts concerning the grading 
system, course credits and guidelines for 
the selection of students for clerkship pro- 
grams. This Office is also the student's 
source of lecture schedules, course out- 
lines, examinations and grades for the inter- 
disciplinary conjoint sciences program. 

Official class rosters and student personal 
data and address files are maintained by 
the Office of Academic Affairs, which serves 
as a liaison between the Dental School and 



51 



the Director of Admissions and Registra- 
tions of the University for the coordination 
of registration procedures. 

The Office is also responsible for coordi- 
nation of a computerized grading system 
which (a) provides each Advancement 
Committee with a composite report on all 
students in the class at the end of each 
semester; (b) generates an individual grade 
report at the end of the first semester to 
advise the student of his progress; and (c) 
provides a final grade report for the aca- 
demic year to both the student and the 
University's Office of Admissions and Reg- 
istrations, which maintains the student's 
permanent record and issues the official 
transcript. 

The Office of Academic Affairs, which is 
under the direction of the Associate Dean 
for Academic Affairs, provides assistance 
to both students and faculty in matters 
relating to the academic program. 

OFFICE OF CLINICAL AFFAIRS 

The clinical programs of the Dental 
School are coordinated by the Office of 
Clinical Affairs. Major functions of this Office 
include scheduling faculty coverage in the 
various disciplines for each clinic module; 
scheduling the rotation of students to spe- 
cial block assignments; assigning patients 
to students; maintaining patient records; 
and maintaining the records of clinical pro- 
cedures performed by students. In addition, 
the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs and 
his staff provide assistance to students who 
encounter difficulty in patient relations. 

More than 100,000 patient appointments 
are provided annually in the clinics of the 
Dental School. The personnel, supplies, 
equipment, collection of fees, etc. associ- 
ated with the operation of a teaching clinic 
are additional responsibilities coordinated 
through this Office. 

HOUSING 

Increased enrollment at the UMAB 
professional schools has placed a strain on 
the limited on-campus housing facilities. 
Only single, full-time students are eligible to 
reside on campus. Priority is given to under- 
graduate professional students. Assignment 
to the residence halls is based on date of 
application, distance from home to the cam- 
pus and availability of space. All assign- 

52 



ments are made without regard for race, 
creed or national origin. Students are as- 
signed spaces by random selection; re- 
quests for specific roommates WILL NOT 
be honored. The University reserves the 
right to make changes in room assignments 
deemed to be in the best interest of the 
students and/or the University. Resident 
accommodations, primarily double occu- 
pancy, are available in the Baltimore Stu- 
dent Union and Parsons Hall Residence for 
Women. Board contracts are not available 
on the Baltimore campus; meals may be 
purchased in the Baltimore Union or Univer- 
sity Hospital cafeterias. Additional informa- 
tion and application forms may be obtained 
from the Director of the Baltimore Union 
621 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, Mary 
land 21201. 

The majority of students live in residential 
areas of the city and the surrounding sub- 
urbs. Upon acceptance into a Dental School 
program, students may request apartment 
and housing listings from the Office of 
Student Affairs or from the Director of the 
Baltimore Union. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

The School provides medical care for it; 
students through the Student Health Serv 
ice, located in Room 145, first floor dl 
Howard Hall, 685 West Baltimore Street 
The office is staffed by a director, assistant 
director, three internists, two psychiatrists 
a psychologist, a gynecologist and three 
registered nurses. 



BALTIMORE UNION 



" 



The Baltimore Union, a five-story buildinc 
which contains a cafeteria, conferenc 
rooms, laundry facilities, game room andj 
lounges, is located at 621 West Lombarc 
Street. The Union is a center for socia 
activities such as dances, receptions anc 
movies, as well as special services fo 
students of the professional schools. 

The Union also coordinates the operatio 
of new recreational facilities atop the Prai 
Street Garage. Facilities include handba 
courts, squash courts, tennis courts, a ba 
ketball court, weight room, locker room 
showers and saunas. A copy of the opera 
tional policy concerning use of the facilitie 
is available in the Athletic Manager's Offic 
on the premises. 




^PUBLICATIONS 

| Dental School and campus publications 
include the semi-annual Dental Newsletter, 
Vith articles concerning dental education at 
ft :he School; The Maryland Probe, an inform- 
ative student publication which deals with 
:opics and current issues of interest to 
jental students and faculty; Happenings, 
published bi-monthly, and Focus, published 
four times annually, to report events and 
<hews of interest to all UMAB campus fac- 
ility, staff and students. These publications 
We distributed free of charge. 

In addition a yearbook, The Mirror, is 
Published annually by student editors and 
'staff; and the Student Dental Association 
^'each year compiles and distributes a stu- 
dent directory. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

jThe University of Maryland 
Student Dental Association 

The University of Maryland Student Den- 
ial Association is the organizational struc- 
ture of the student body. It is presided over 
%nd governed by elected representatives 
from each class and is represented on 
^appropriate committees of the Faculty 
((Council. The organization participates in 
Certain student-faculty activities and spon- 
sors and directs all student social activities. 
It is responsible for the publication of the 
School's yearbook, The Mirror. The UMSDA 
is unique among dental student organiza- 
tions in having formulated its own constitu- 
tion and code of ethics. 



The American Student Dental 
Association 

This organization was established in Feb- 
ruary, 1971, with the aid of the ADA. Its 
primary purposes are to secure scholar- 
ships, loans, and national reciprocity edu- 
cation for students; and to assist in other 
student-related affairs. 

Student National Dental 
Association 

The Maryland Chapter of the Student 
National Dental Association was founded in 
1973. The primary objective of this organi- 
zation is to foster the admission, develop- 
ment and graduation of Black dental and 
dental hygiene students. Among the activi- 
ties in which the Maryland Chapter is en- 
gaged are minority recruitment, tutoring, 
social and professional programs, and com- 
munity and university relations. 

American Dental Hygienists' 
Association 

Members of the student chapter of the 
American Dental Hygienists' Association are 
involved in activities such as scheduling 
guest speakers, fund-raising projects and 
improving liaison with the local constituent 
association. They also participate in meet- 
ings and discussion groups on a regional 
and national level. Representatives attend 
the annual meetings of the American Dental 
Hygienists' Association. 



53 



The American Association of 
Dental Schools 

The Association's objective is to promote 
the advancement of dental education, re- 
search and service in all appropriately ac- 
credited institutions that offer programs for 
dental personnel. The Association has three 
membership categories: individual, student 
($4.00) and honorary. Student members 
receive the Journal of Dental Education 
and the Dental Student News published by 
the Association. During the year the local 
chapter conducts programs to promote the 
goals of this organization. One Dental 
School representative each from the dental, 
dental hygiene and postdoctoral student 
membership is elected to serve on the 
Council of Students of the American Asso- 
ciation of Dental Schools. 



The Gorgas Odontological Society 

The Gorgas Odontological Society was 
organized in 1916 as an honorary student 
dental society with scholarship as a basis 
for admission. The Society was named after 
Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, a pioneer in 
dental education, a teacher of many years' 
experience and a major contributor to dental 
literature. It was with the idea of perpetuat- 
ing his name that the Society adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student 
must rank in the highest 30 percent of his 
class. Speakers prominent in the dental 
and medical fields are invited to address 
members at monthly meetings. An effort is 
made to obtain speakers not connected 
with the university. 



Omicron Kappa Upsilon 

Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, 
national honorary dental society, was char- 
tered at the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of Mary- 
land during the 1928-1929 academic year. 
Students whose rank for the entire course 
of study is among the highest 12 percent of 
the class are eligible. This high honor is 
conferred upon those seniors who, in addi- 
tion to scholarship, have demonstrated ex- 
emplary character traits and potential for 
future professional growth and attainment. 



54 



The Aisenberg Research Society 

The Aisenberg Research Society was 
founded in 1967 by dental students inter- 
ested in sharing research ideas with promi- 
nent dental researchers and each other. 
The Society was named after the eminent 
investigator and former Dean of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Dental School, Dr. Myron 
S. Aisenberg. Scholarship and research 
experience are the main criteria for mem- 
bership. The Society invites to membership 
students of all classes who have partici- 
pated in fellowships either at the Dental 
School or some other research institution. 



Gamma Pi Delta 

Chartered in 1965, Gamma Pi Delta is 
an honorary student dental organization 
with scholarship and interest in the field of 
prosthetic dentistry as a basis for admis- 
sion. The objective of the organization is 
the advancement of prosthetic dentistry 
through lectures, table clinics and othei 
academic activities which will stimulate the 
creative interest of students and the profesi 
sion in general. 



Professional Dental Fraternities 

The professional dental fraternity is a 
Greek letter organization of men, bondec 
together by ritual. It is a specialized frater 
nity which limits its membership to selectee 
graduates and students, enrolled and satis; 
factorily pursuing courses in an accreditee 
college of dentistry. It is not an honorar 
fraternity or recognition society which coni 
fers membership to recognize outstanding 
scholarship. 

Its aim is to promote the high ideals an; 
standards of its profession, advance thi 
professional knowledge and welfare of it 
members and provide a medium throug 
which its members, with a common interes 
can develop everlasting friendships. 

To do this, the professional dental frate 
nity follows a pattern in the selection an| 
training of its members that stresses th 
importance of high professional ethics an 
practices; fosters athletic and social tunc 
tions that stimulate the development of life 
long friendships; conducts an extensive pre 
gram of speakers, tours, forums and re 



search projects that are designed to 
Droaden the professional knowledge of its 
members; and grants scholarships and 
awards that encourage professional profi- 
ciency and provide a service to its college 
and community. It complements the curric- 
jlum of the college and provides the cultural 
and social graces to round out the whole 
man. 

The following professional dental fraterni- 
ies constitute the American Dental Inter- 
raternity Council and have over 140 under- 
graduate chapters on campuses of the 
Rental schools in this country: Alpha Om- 
; 3ga, founded in 1907; Delta Sigma Delta, 
ounded in 1882; Xi Psi Phi, founded in 
1 889; and Psi Omega, founded in 1892. 
These fraternities have more than 150 ac- 
ive alumni chapters scattered throughout 
he world. Eighty-five percent of those active 
1 the dental profession have fraternity affil- 
iation. 



AWARDS 

. 

: Awards are presented to senior students 
at graduation to recognize the following 
Hchievements and qualities: 



• achievement, proficiency and/or poten- 
tial in each of the following specialty 
areas: 

• anesthesiology 

• dentistry for children 

• dental radiology 

• endodontics 

• gold foil operation 

• oral medicine 

• oral pathology 

• orthodontics 

• periodontology 

Dental Hygiene 

• highest scholastic average 

• grade point average among the five 
highest in the class 

• humanitarianism, ethical standards 
and devotion to the profession 

• interest in and potential for active par- 
ticipation in professional organizations 

• interest and participation in the student 
chapter of the American Dental Hy- 
gienists' Association 

• outstanding clinical performance 

• outstanding leadership and participa- 
tion in community activities and stu- 
dent and professional organizations 



Dentistry 



highest scholastic average 
grade point average among the ten 
highest in the class 

highest average in basic dental sci- 
ence 

ethical standards, kindness and hu- 
manitarianism 
professional demeanor 
devotion to the School and the profes- 
sion 

characteristics of an outstanding gen- 
eral practitioner 

the most professional growth and de- 
velopment 

conscientious and enthusiastic devo- 
tion to clinical practice 
high proficiency in clinical care and 
patient management 
greatest proficiency in oral surgery 
excellence in fixed partial prosthesis 
excellence in complete oral operative 
restoration 

excellence in practical set of full upper 
and lower dentures 
outstanding senior thesis 




55 



ADMINISTRATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Chairman 

B. Herbert Brown, LLD., Litt. D. 
Vice Chairman 

Hugh A. McMullen 
Secretary 

Samuel H. Hoover, D.D.S. 
Treasurer 

N. Thomas Whittington, Jr. 
Assistant Secretary 

Mary H. Broadwater 
Assistant Treasurer 

John C. Scarbath 
Members 

Percy M. Chaimson 

Robert M. Coultas, Jr. 

Ralph W. Frey 

The Honorable Young D. Hance, Ex Offi- 
cio 

A. Paul Moss 

James W. Motsay 

Peter F. O'Malley 

The Honorable Joseph D. Tydings 

Wilbur G. Valentine 
Chairman Emeritus 

Louis L. Kaplan, Ph.D., D.H.L. 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 

President 

Wilson H. Elkins, Ph.D. 
Vice President for General Administration 

Donald W. O'Connell, Ph.D. 
Vice President for Academic Affairs 

R. Lee Hornbake, Ph.D. 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and 
Research 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., Ph.D. 
Vice President for Agricultural Affairs and 
Legislative Relations 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr., Ph.D. 
Vice President for University Development 

Robert G. Smith 



THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND AT 
BALTIMORE 

OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

President 

Wilson H. Elkins — B.A., University of 
Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford 
University, 1936; D. Phil., 1936. 

Chancellor 

Albin O. Kuhn — B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs 
John M. Dennis — B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1945. 

PRINCIPAL ACADEMIC OFFICERS 

Dean, Dental School 

Errol L. Reese — B.S., Fairmont State Col- 
lege, 1960; D.D.S. , West Virginia Univer- 
sity, 1963; M.S., University of Detroit, 
1968. 

Dean, School of Law 

Michael J. Kelly — B.A., Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1959; Ph.D., Cambridge University, 
1964; LL.B., Yale University, 1967. 

Dean, School of Medicine 

John M. Dennis — B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1945. 

Dean, School of Nursing 

Marion I. Murphy — B.S., University ofl 
Minnesota, 1936; M.P.H., University of| 
Michigan, 1946; Ph.D., 1959. 

Dean, School of Pharmacy, and Dean ofl 

Graduate Studies and Research 

William J. Kinnard, Jr. — B.S., Universit 
of Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D 
Purdue University, 1957. 

Dean, School of Social Work and Commu- 
nity Planning 

Ruth H. Young— A.B., Wellesley College 
1944; M.S.S.W., The Catholic Universit* 
of America, 1949; D.S.W., 1965. 

Director, University of Maryland Hospital 
G. Bruce McFadden — B.S., Virginia Poly 
technic Institute, 1957; M.H.A., Medics 
College of Virginia, 1961. 



56 



OFFICERS FOR CENTRAL AND 
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

Assistant to the Chancellor 

W. Jackson Stenger, Ph.D. 
Assistant to the Chancellor 

Roy Borom 
Director of Admissions and Registrations 

Wayne A. Smith 
Director of Business Services 

Robert C. Brown 

Director of Health Sciences Computer Cen- 
ter 

Frederick N. Straughn, Ph.D. 
Director of Personnel Services 

Ronald J. Baril 
Director of Physical Plant 

Robert L. Walton 
Director, Student Health Service 

Wilfred H. Townshend, M.D. 
Director, University Relations 

Louise M. White 
Librarian 

Cyril Feng 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF 
THE DENTAL SCHOOL 

Errol L. Reese, Dean 

B.S., Fairmont State College, 1960; 

D.D.S., West Virginia University, 1963; 

M.S., University of Detroit, 1968. 
Warren M. Morgan stein, Associate Dean 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 

1969; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins 

University, 1975. 
Ernest F. Moreland, Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs 

B.S., University of Georgia, 1960; M.A., 

Western Carolina University, 1962; Ed. 

D., Indiana University, 1967. 
John F. Hasler, Associate Dean for Clinical 
Affairs 

B.S., Indiana University, 1958; D.D.S., 

1962; M.S.D., 1969. 
Charles T. Pridgeon, Associate Dean for 
Continuing Education and Alumni Affairs 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 
Donald E. Shay, Assistant Dean for Biolog- 
ical Sciences 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; 

M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; Ph.D., 

1943. 
Charles B. Leonard, Jr., Assistant Dean for 
Recruitment and Admissions 

B.A., Rutgers College, 1955; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1957; Ph.D., 1963. 
Mark L. Wagner, Assistant Dean for Stu- 
dent Affairs 

A.B., Birmingham Southern College, 

1959; D.M.D., University of Alabama, 

1963. 
Wilbur O. Ramsey, Assistant Dean for Ad- 
vanced Specialty Education 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 



57 



THE FACULTY 

FACULTY EMERITI 

Irving I. Abramson, D.D.S., Professor Emer- 
itus 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., Dean Emeritus 

Joseph C. Biddix, D.D.S., Professor Emeri- 
tus 

Edward C. Dobbs, D.D.S., B.S., Professor 
Emeritus 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 

Gardner P. H. Foley, A.M., A.B., Professor 
Emeritus 

William E. Hahn, D.D.S., M.S., A.B., Profes- 
sor Emeritus 

Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S., Professor Emeri- 
tus 

Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 

L. Edward Warner, D.D.S., Professor Emer- 
itus 

Riley S. Williamson, Jr., D.D.S., Professor 
Emeritus 

George McLean, M.D., Associate Professor 
Emeritus 

Ida M. Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S., Librarian 
Emeritus 

FACULTY 

George C. Abraham, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Fixed Restorative Dentistry, 
I.Sc, Nowrasjee Wadia College (India), 
1958; B.D.S., Bombay University, 1964; 
M.S., Loma Linda University, 1967. 

Curtis Adams, D.D.S., Clinical Field Instruc- 
tor. 

Harry Aks, Assistant Professor of Oral Di- 
agnosis, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1937. 

Andrew L. Allen, Assistant Professor of 
Periodontics, B.A., Bowdoin College, 
1963; D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1967; M.S., The George Washington Uni- 
versity, 1973. 

William R. Allen, D.D.S., Clinical Field In- 
structor. 

Stanley S. Andrews, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Endodontics, B.S., St. John's 
University, 1961; D.D.S., New York Uni- 
versity, 1965; M.S.D., University of Wash- 
ington, 1971. 

Ramzi G. Anton, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Endodontics, B.D.S., University of 
Baghdad, 1958; M.S., University of De- 
troit, 1965; D.D.S., Howard University, 
1971. 



Mark M. Applefeld, Lecturer in Oral Diag- 
nosis, B.S., Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity, 1965; M.D., University of Maryland, 
1969. 

Marvin B. Apter, D.D.S., Clinical Field In- 
structor. 

Amira A. Arafat, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Pathology, D.D.S., Damascus University 
(Syria), 1959; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1971. 

David S. August, Associate Clinical Profes- 
sor of Endodontics, D.D.S., Temple Uni- 
versity, 1964. 

Donald Bailey, D.D.S., Clinical Field In- 
structor. 

Veronica M. Bakker, Assistant Professor of 
Pediatric Dentistry, D.D.S., University of 
Amsterdam, 1972. 

Sophia A. Balis, Associate Clinical Profes- 
sor of Pediatric Dentistry, D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Athens (Greece), 1957; D.D.S., 
University of Toronto (Canada), 1966. 

Sanford A. Barber, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Periodontics, B.A., Queens Col- 
lege, 1968; D.M.D., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1972. 

Sue-ning C. Barry, Professor of Anatomy, 
B.A., Barat College, 1955; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1961. 

Nasir Bashirelahi, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry, B.S., Tehran University 
(Iran), 1960; Pharm.D., 1962; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Louisville, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 

Todd Beckerman, Associate Professor of 
Oral Pathology, B.A., Emory University, 
1959; D.D.S., Columbia University, 1963. 

Robert B. Bennett, Assistant Professor of 
Physiology, B.A., Carleton College, 1960; 
M.S., University of Nebraska, 1963; 
Ph.D., 1967. 

Howard F. Benson, Clinical Instructor of 
Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1972; D.D.S., 1976. 

Kathy B. Benveniste, Assistant Professor on 
Biochemistry, B.A., Goucher College, 
1966; M.Ph., Yale University, 1968; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1971. 

Stewart A. Bergman, Associate Professo, 
of Oral Surgery, B.A., Brooklyn College 
1964; D.D.S., State University of New 
York, 1968. 

John J. Bergquist, Professor of Periodon 
tics, D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1954 
M.S., 1970. 



58 



Gerald S. Bers, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1969; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1973; M.P.H., University of 
Minnesota, 1975. 

Lois Y. Beverly, Lecturer in Oral Diagnosis, 
B.S., Howard University, 1956; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1960. 

Paul D. Biederman, Assistant Professor of 
Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., City University 
of New York, 1966; D.D.S., State Univer- 
sity of New York, 1970. 

Thomas K. Binkley, Assistant Professor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, D.M.D., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, 1972. 

Henry Blank, D.D.S., Clinical Field Instruc- 
tor. 

Jordan S. Bloom, Associate Clinical Profes- 
sor of Oral Diagnosis, B.A., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1949; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1953. 

Byron A. Bonebreak, Jr., Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Orthodontics, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, 1968; D.M.D., 1972; 
M.S., West Virginia University, 1977. 

Arthur J. Bonito, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., College of 
the Holy Cross, 1965; M.S., Purdue Uni- 
versity, 1967. 

Rachel Z. Booth, Lecturer in Oral Diagno- 
sis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1968; 
M.S., 1970. 

Gerald M. Bowers, Professor of Periodon- 
tics, B.S., University of Michigan, 1950; 
D.D.S., 1954; M.S., Ohio State University, 
1962. 

J. Richard Bradbury, Assistant Professor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Ohio 
State University, 1969; D.D.S., 1972. 

Natalie K. Brad sh aw, Clinical Instructor of 
Periodontics, A. A., Essex Community 
College, 1975; A. A., Community College 
of Baltimore, 1976. 

Martin Braun, Lecturer in Oral Diagnosis, 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1970. 

Neal Brayton, D.D.S., Clinical Field Instruc- 
tor. 

I. Norton Brotman, Clinical Professor of 
Oral Diagnosis, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1936. 



George F. Buchness, Associate Professor 
of Basic Dental Science, B.S., Loyola 
College, 1948; M.S., Catholic University 
of America, 1954; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1961. 

Raymond M. Burgison, Professor of Phar- 
macology, B.S., Loyola College, 1945; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1948; Ph.D., 
1950; M.L.A., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1968. 

Morris Burke, Assistant Professor of Physi- 
ology, B.Sc, University of Sydney (Aus- 
tralia), 1960; M.Sc, University of South 
Wales (Australia), 1963; Ph.D., 1966. 

Donald G. Burks, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Periodontics, D.D.S., University of 
Iowa, 1967. 

Richard R. Burt, Clinical Instructor of Endo- 
dontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1970. 

Arthur Bushel, Lecturer in Oral Health Care 
Delivery, A.B., Brooklyn College, 1940; 
D.D.S., Columbia University, 1943; 
M.P.H., 1947. 

Jerome D. Buxbaum, Assistant Research 
Professor of Physiology, B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1951; D.D.S., 1955. 

Jesse Cad en, Clinical Instructor of Oral 
Diagnosis, B.S., Georgetown University, 
1934; D.D.S., New York University, 1941. 

Stephen G. Cameron, Instructor of Oral 
Surgery, B.A., University of Virginia, 
1971; D.D.S., Virginia Commonwealth 
University, 1976. 

Seth B. Canion, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., Howard Uni- 
versity, 1969; D.D.S., 1973. 

Sylvan Caplan, D.D.S., Clinical Field In- 
structor. 

Joseph P. Cappuccio, Clinical Professor of 
Oral Surgery, B.S., University of Rhode 
Island, 1943; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1946. 

John Carr, Associate Professor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Howard Uni- 
versity, 1948; D.D.S., Meharry Medical 
College, 1953. 

Grace M. Centola, Instructor of Anatomy, 
B.S., Syracuse University, 1973; Ph.D., 
Georgetown University, 1977. 

Yung-Feng Chang, Associate Professor of 
Microbiology, B.S., National Taiwan Uni- 
versity, 1958; M.S., 1960; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, 1966. 



59 



Gerald S. Charles, Jr., Assistant Professor 
of Oral Diagnosis, B.S., Howard Univer- 
sity, 1965; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1975; M.P.H., Harvard University, 1976. 

Selig Chester, Clinical Instructor of Oral 
Diagnosis, D.D.S., Temple University, 
1946. 

William E. Chmar, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Periodontics, B.S., Loyola College, 
1965; D.D.S., Georgetown University, 
1969. 

Suresh C. Choudhary, Associate Clinical 
Professor of Removable Prosthodontics, 
F.Sc, G.M. Memorial College (India), 
1951; B.D.S., Sir C.E.M. Dental College 
(India), 1955; M.S., Marquette University, 
1963; D.D.S., 1967. 

Richard L. Christiansen, Lecturer in Ortho- 
dontics, D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1959; 
M.S.D., Indiana University, 1964; Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota, 1970. 

Harvey S. Cohen, Clinical Instructor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.A., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1969; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1974. 

Steven C. Cohen, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Endodontics, B.S., Brooklyn Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, 1968; D.D.S., Howard 
University, 1972. 

James A. Coll, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1969; D.M.D., 1969; M.S., 
University of Oregon, 1974. 

Simon A. Courtade, Assistant Professor of 
Biochemistry, B.A., Wesleyan University, 
1949; M.S., University of Michigan, 1952; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1965. 

James F. Craig, Associate Professor of 
Dental Education, B.S., Western Illinois 
University, 1968; M.S., Indiana University, 
1970; Ed.D., 1972. 

Harold L. Crossley, Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacology, B.S., University of Rhode 
Island, 1964; M.S., 1969; Ph.D., 1972. 

Mark L. Curl, Instructor of Oral Diagnosis, 
B.S., Frostburg State College, 1969; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1977. 

Thomas E. Daley, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Periodontics, B.S., Case Western 
Reserve University, 1969; D.D.S.. 1971; 
M.S., 1973. 

Allan H. Dana, Assistant Professor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of 
Miami, 1959; M.B.A., 1961. 



60 



Allan L. Del isle, Associate Professor of 
Microbiology, B.S., University of Califor- 
nia, 1960; M.S., 1961; Ph.D., University 
of Massachusetts, 1968. 

George E. Dent, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., Georgetown Univer- 
sity, 1961; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1965. 

Louis G. DePaola, Clinical Instructor of Oral 
Diagnosis, B.A., University of Maryland, 
1971; D.D.S., 1975. 

Alfred J. DeRenzis, Assistant Professor of 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Muhlen- 
berg College, 1967; D.M.D., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1971. 

Raj end ra J. DeSai, Associate Professor of 
Removable Prosthodontics, B.D.S., Nair 
Dental College (India), 1961; D.D.S., 
Howard University, 1971. 

Duane T. DeVore, Professor of Oral Sur- 
gery, D.D.S., Loyola University (Chicago), 
1956; Ph.D., University of London, 1975. 

Jose H. Diaz, Associate Professor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., University of 
Puerto Rico, 1941; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1950. 

Charles D. Dietrich, Clinical Instructor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1972; D.D.S., 1977. 

Joseph M. DiGianni, Assistant Professor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., St. 
John's University, 1966; D.D.S., George- 
town University, 1970; M.S., 1977. 

Larry Dober, Clinical Instructor of Periodon- 
tics, B.A., City University of New York, 
1972; D.M.D., Tufts University, 1975. 

Frank A. Dolle, Clinical Professor of Phar- 
macology, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1948; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., 1954; D.D.S., 
1959. 

Charles J. Donnelly, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, A.B., University of Michi- 
gan, 1942; D.D.S., 1945; M.P.H., 1948. 

Alex J. Drabkowski, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., 
Wayne State University, 1951; D.D.S., 
University of Detroit, 1955; M.P.H., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1967. 

Gwendolyn F. Dunn, Assistant Clinical Pro 
fessor of Orthodontics, B.A., Dillard Uni 
versity, 1964; D.D.S., Meharry Medical 
College, 1970; M.S., State University of 
New York, 1972. 



Dorothy J. Duvall, R.D.H., Clinical Field 
Instructor. 

Robert J. Eisenberg, Clinical Instructor of 
Periodontics, B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson 
University, 1972; D.D.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1976. 

Samia A. Eli as, Assistant Professor of Re- 
movable Prosthodontics, B.D.S., Alexan- 
dria University (Egypt), 1965. 

Barbara T. English, R.D.H., Clinical Field 
Instructor. 

^oy L. Eskow, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Periodontics, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1968; M.A., 1971; D.D.S., 1974. 

\/larylou S. Everett, Instructor of Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1976. 

JoAnne Fahey, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., University of North 
Carolina, 1968; M.P.H., 1971. 

Judith C. Fales, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., Bates College, 1972; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1975. 

A/illiam A. Falkler, Jr., Associate Professor 
of Microbiology, B.A., Western Maryland 
College, 1966; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1969; Ph.D., 1971. 

Sylvan Feldman, Clinical Instructor of Per- 
iodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1962; D.D.S., 1965. 

Robert K. Fenster, Associate Professor of 
Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S., Uni- 

: versity of Nebraska, 1957. 

D at Fetchero, Associate Professor of Re- 
movable Prosthodontics, A.B., West Vir- 
ginia University, 1949; D.D.S., University 

' of Maryland, 1952. 

lohn P. Fields, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Endodontics, B.S., University of Mary- 



land, 1967; D.D.S., 1971 



William B. Finagin, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Fixed Restorative Dentistry, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1959; 
D.D.S., 1963. 

lane L. Forrest, Assistant Professor of Den- 
tal Hygiene, B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson 
University, 1972; M.S., Boston University, 
1976. 

>aul D. Frazier, Lecturer in Orthodontics, 
B.S., McPherson College, 1958; D.D.S., 
University of Iowa, 1961; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Washington, 1971. 



Gerson Freedman, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1935. 

William T. Fridinger, D.D.S., Clinical Field 
Instructor. 

Raymond S. Garrison, Assistant Professor 
of Oral Diagnosis, B.S., Davidson Col- 
lege, 1967; D.D.S., University of North 
Carolina, 1971; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1976. 

Leslie P. Gartner, Associate Professor of 
Anatomy, B.A., Rutgers University, 1965; 
M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 1970. 

George Gillespie, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, L.D.S., Royal College of 
Surgeons (London), 1955; B.D.S., Univer- 
sity of London, 1955; D.D.S., University 
of Toronto (Canada), 1963; M.P.H., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1964. 

James C. Gingell, Assistant Professor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1968; D.D.S., 1972. 

Joel H. Goldberg, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Fixed Restorative Dentistry, 
D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1971. 

Stephen A. Goldman, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Periodontics, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1965; D.D.S., 1968. 

John J. Golski, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Periodontics, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1965. 

Michael J. Goode, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Endodontics, B.A., University of 
Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., 1965. 

Allan J. Goodfriend, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Endodontics, B.S., Fairleigh 
Dickinson University, 1964; D.D.S., 1969. 

Nelson J. Goodman, Clinical Instructor of 
Endodontics, B.A., Franklin and Marshall 
College, 1969; D.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1973. 

James G. Gordon, Clinical Instructor of 
Orthodontics, B.S., University of South 
Carolina, 1971; D.D.S., Virginia Common- 
wealth University, 1975. 

Barry G. Graham, Clinical Instructor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1969; D.D.S., 1973. 

Marvin M. Graham, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Fixed Restorative Dentistry, 
A.B., Cornell University, 1938; A.M., 
1939; D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 
1943. 



61 



James H. Greeley, Professor of Fixed Res- 
torative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1959; M.S.D., Indiana Uni- 
versity, 1966. 

Ronald B. Greenwald, Clinical Instructor of 
Orthodontics, B.S., State University of 
New York, 1972; D.D.S., 1976. 

Suzanne F. Grefsheim, Instructor of Dental 
Education, B.A., University of Minnesota, 
1965; M.Ed., University of Cincinnati, 
1975; M.S.L.S., Catholic University of 
America, 1976. 

John M. Grewe, Professor of Orthodontics, 
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1960; 
D.D.S., 1962; M.S.D., 1964; Ph.D., 1966. 

James L. Gutmann, Assistant Professor of 
Endodontics, D.D.S., Marquette Univer- 
sity, 1970. 

Lawrence F. Hal pert, Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics, A.B., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1958; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1962. 

McDonald K. Hamilton, Professor of Oral 
Surgery, A.B., Alma College, 1952; 
D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1956. 

Sandra Hamlet, Lecturer in Orthodontics, 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1959; M.A., 
University of Washington, 1967; Ph.D., 
1970. 

Susan Hardland, Instructor of Dental Hy- 
giene, B.S., University of Maryland, 1977. 

Robert W. Haroth, Associate Professor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1958; M.Ed., 1972. 

John F. Hasler, Professor of Oral Diagnosis, 
B.S., Indiana University, 1959; D.D.S., 
1962; M.S.D., 1969. 

Charles E. Hawley, Lecturer in Microbiol- 
ogy, A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 
1957; D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 
1962; M.S., University of Illinois, 1970; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1976. 

Arthur L. Hayden, Assistant Professor of 
Oral Health Care Delivery, D.M.D., Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, 1945. 

Susan E. Hayduk, Assistant Professor of 
Periodontics, B.S., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1966; D.M.D., 1969. 

Martin Helrich, Lecturer in Oral Surgery, 
B.S., Dickinson College, 1946; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1946. 



James L. Hiatt, Associate Professor of 
Anatomy, B.S., Ball State University, 
1959; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1973. 

Mark A. Higginbottom, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Orthodontics, B.A., Syracuse 
University, 1970; D.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1974. 

Joe T. Hillsman, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of Ten- 
nessee, 1953; M.P.H., University of North 
Carolina, 1972. 

Alvan M. Holston, Assistant Professor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., 1967. 

Matthias J. Hourigan, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Oral Surgery, D.D.S., University 
of Pittsburgh, 1958. 

Eric J. Ho viand, Assistant Professor of En- 
dodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1968; D.D.S., 1972; M.Ed., Virginia Com- 
monwealth University, 1977. 

John R. Iddings, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., 
Roanoke College, 1962; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1966. 

Nicholas llchyshyn, Clinical Instructor of 
Periodontics, B.A., Temple University, 
1971; D.D.S., Emory University, 1975. 

Conrad L. Inman, Jr., Lecturer in Oral 
Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1944. 

Alfred H. Jansen, Jr., Lecturer in Microbiol- 
ogy, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1958; B.S., 1962; M.S., 1968. 

Barbara G. Jeffrey, instructor of Fixed Res- 
torative Dentistry, B.A., Goucher College, 
1973; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1377. 

Robert I. Jeffrey, Instructor of Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1974; M.A., 1974. 

Frank C. Jerbi, Professor of Removable* 
Prosthodontics, D.D.S., Loyola University 
(Chicago), 1939. 

Charles H. Johnson, Clinical Instructor of 
Oral Diagnosis, B.S., Morgan College, 
1948; D.D.S., Howard University, 1954 

Orlen N. Johnson, Lecturer in Oral Diagno- 
sis, B.S., University of Minnesota, 1957: 
D.D.S., 1959; M.S., Wayne State Univen] 
sity, 1964. 

Robert D. Jones, D.D.S., Clinical Field In- \ 
structor. 



62 



J. Mehsen Joseph, Lecturer in Microbiol- 
ogy, A.B., University of West Virginia, 
1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, 1951. 

Barry L. Jurist, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Endodontics, B.A., City University of 
New York, 1965; D.D.S., New York Uni- 
versity, 1969. 

Eric M. Kahn, Clinical Instructor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., City Univer- 
sity of New York, 1970; D.D.S., Virginia 
Commonwealth University, 1974. 

Michael J. Kaminski, Clinical Instructor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, A.B., Holy 
Cross University, 1968; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1972. 

Barry M. Katz, Clinical Instructor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., West Vir- 
ginia University, 1971. 

Nathan Katz, Clinical Instructor of Oral 
Diagnosis, D.D.S., Georgetown Univer- 
sity, 1948. 

Kathleen L. Keene, Instructor of Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., Columbia University, 
1976. 

Makhdoom Ali Khan, Assistant Professor of 
Anatomy, B.S., West Virginia University, 
1966; M.S., 1971; Ph.D., 1975. 

George W. Kidder, III, Associate Professor 
of Physiology, A.B., Amherst College, 
1956; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1961. 

Francis Y. Kihara, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Periodontics, D.D.S., Marquette 
University, 1963. 

Francis J. Kihn, Clinical Professor of Pedi- 
atric Dentistry, B.S., Loyola College, 
1952; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1956. 

j Keith E. Kinderknecht, Instructor of Fixed 
i Restorative Dentistry, D.M.D., University 

of Kentucky, 1971. 
j Stanley H. Klein, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Endodontics, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1963; D.D.S., 1966. 

Dushanka V. Kleinman, Assistant Professor 
of Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1969; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1973; M.Sc.D., Boston 
University, 1976. 

Stanley Kogan, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Oral Surgery, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1954. 



Richard M. Kondrat, Clinical Instructor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Boston 
College, 1970; D.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1974. 

George N. Krywolap, Professor of Microbi- 
ology, B.S., Drexel Institute of Technol- 
ogy, 1960; M.S., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 

Kim L. Kuhlke, Assistant Professor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., Northwest- 
em University, 1975; M.S., University of 
Iowa, 1977. 

Ronald S. Kushner, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., City College of New 
York, 1965; D.D.S., Howard University, 
1971. 

Mark J. Kutcher, Assistant Professor of 
Oral Diagnosis, B.A., Temple University, 
1966; D.D.S., 1970; M.S., Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1977. 

John P. Lambooy, Professor of Biochemis- 
try, B.A., Kalamazoo College, 1937; M.S., 
1938; M.A., University of Illinois, 1939; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1942. 

Gerald Lamkin, D.D.S., Clinical Field In- 
structor. 

Patricia A. Landis, Lecturer in Pediatric 
Dentistry, B.A., Heidelberg College, 1951; 
M.A., Case Western Reserve University, 
1956. 

Edmond R. Leach II, D.D.S., Clinical Field 
Instructor. 

Charles B. Leonard, Jr., Professor of Bio- 
chemistry, B.A., Rutgers College, 1955; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1957; Ph.D., 
1963. 

Robert J. Leupold, Professor of Removable 
Prosthodontics, D.M.D., Tufts University, 
1949; M.A., George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1975. 

Hubert Leveque, Lecturer in Oral Diagnosis, 
B.A., University of Neuchatel (Switzer- 
land), 1961; M.D., University of Lausanne 
(Switzerland), 1969. 

Barry S. Lever, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Periodontics, B.S., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1954; D.D.S., 1958. 

Elka S. Levin, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Oral Diagnosis, B.S., National College 
J.F. Alcorta (Argentina), 1946; D.D.S., 
University of Buenos Aires (Argentina), 
1951; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1970; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1971. 



63 



L. Stefan Levin, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Pediatric Dentistry, A.B., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1960; D.M.D., 1964; 
M.S.D., Indiana University, 1971. 

Harris B. Levine, Clinical Instructor of En- 
dodontics, B.A., Boston University, 1970; 
D.D.S., Case Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, 1974. 

Dennis L. Levinson, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Endodontics, B.A., University of 
Maryland, 1968; D.D.S., 1972. 

Bernard A. Levy, Associate Professor of 
Oral Patholoqy, A.B., Ohio University, 
1963; D.D.S., Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, 1966; M.S.D., Indiana University, 
1969. 

Gail F. Levy, Instructor of Dental Hygiene, 
B.S., University of Michigan, 1974. 

Donald E. Lewis, Clinical Instructor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Loyola Col- 
lege, 1968; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1972. 

Joseph P. Libonati, Lecturer in Microbiol- 
ogy, M.S., Duquesne University, 1965; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1968. 

Richard Lindenberg, Lecturer in Anatomy, 
M.D., University of Berlin, 1944. 

Gus J. Livaditis, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Fixed Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., 
Temple University, 1970. 

Herbert L. Livingston, Associate Clinical 
Professor of Periodontics, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., George- 
town University, 1968. 

Paul E. Lovdahl, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Endodontics, D.D.S., Marquette 
University, 1970; M.S.D., University of 
Washington, 1976. 

Ethelbert Lovett, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1922. 

Martin Lunin, Professor of Oral Pathology, 
B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1938; 
D.D.S., Washington University, 1950; 
M.P.H., Columbia University, 1952. 

Dean E. McKinnon, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University 
of Maryland, 1950; M.S., Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1952; D.D.S., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1956. 

Roger W. McWilliams, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Oral Diagnosis, B.A., Col- 
gate University, 1969; D.M.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1972; Ph.D., 1976. 



Elton P. Maddox, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
Morgan State College, 1968; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1972. 

John E. Markel, D.D.S., Clinical Field In- 
structor. 

Frank W. Mastrola, Jr., Associate Professor 
of Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Prov- 
idence College, 1956; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1960. 

Genevieve E. Matanoski, Lecturer in Oral 
Health Care Delivery, A.B., Radcliffe Col- 
lege, 1951; M.D., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1955; M.P.H., 1962; Dr. P.H., 
1964. 

John H. Mattocks, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Endodontics, B.S., Livingston Col- 
lege, 1964; D.D.S., Howard University, 
1972. 

Timothy F. Meiller, Instructor of Oral Diag- 
nosis, B.A., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1970; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1975. 

Richard M. Meszler, Associate Professor of 
Anatomy, A.B., New York University, 
1964; Ph.D., University of Louisville, 
1969. 

Cheryl T. Metzger, Assistant Professor of 
Dental Hygiene, B.S., Ohio State Univer- 
sity, 1967; M.S., University of Michigan, 
1971. 

Glenn E. Minah, Assistant Professor of 
Microbiology /Pediatric Dentistry, A.B., 
Duke University, 1961; D.D.S., University 
of North Carolina, 1966; M.S., University 
of Michigan, 1970; Ph.D., 1976. 

Ernest F. Moreland, Professor of Dental 
Education, B.S., University of Georgia 
1960; M.A., Western Carolina University 
1962; Ed.D., Indiana University, 1967. 

Warren M. Morganstein, Associate Profes- 
sor of Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S. 
University of Maryland, 1966; D.D.S. 
1969; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins Univer 
sity, 1975. 

Edwin L. Morris, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Orthodontics, B.A., University of Mary 
land, 1971; D.D.S., 1974. 

Martin H. Morris, Associate Professor o 
Biochemistry, B.S., Rutgers University 
1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D., University o 
Maryland, 1965. 



64 



Gordon A. Morse, Instructor of Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., American Interna- 
tional College, 1962; M.B.A., University 
of Miami, 1966. 

Kenneth E. Mort, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1967; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Missouri, 1970. 

M. Jeffrey Morton, Clinical Instructor of 
Periodontics, B.S., Polytechnic Institute 
of New York, 1971; D.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1975. 

Patricia L. Mulford, Instructor of Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1974. 

Norbert R. Myslinski, Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacology, B.S., Canisius College, 
1969; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1973. 

Birgit E. Nardell, Assistant Professor of 
Physiology, B.S., University of Illinois, 
1961; M.S., University of Maryland, 1964; 
Ph.D., 1969. 

Robert K. Nauman, Assistant Professor of 
Microbiology, B.S., Pennsylvania State 
University, 1963; M.S., University of Mas- 
sachusetts, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 

Kathleen Neal, R.D.H., Clinical Field In- 
structor 

Sharon L. Nelson, Instructor of Fixed Res- 
torative Dentistry, B.S., Whitworth Col- 
lege, 1969; D.D.S., University of Wash- 
ington, 1976. 

William B. Nipper, Jr., Clinical Instructor of 
Endodontics, D.M.D., Medical College of 
Georgia, 1973. 

Jerry D. Niswander, Lecturer in Orthodon- 
tics, D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1955; 
M.S., 1962. 

Lawrence A. Nurin, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Periodontics, B.S., Fairleigh 
Dickinson, 1964; D.D.S., Howard Univer- 
sity, 1968. 

Richard M. Oksas, Assistant Professor of 
Oral Diagnosis, Pharm.D., University of 
Southern California, 1970; M.P.H., Uni- 
versity of California Los Angeles, 1971. 

Donald L. Olson, Professor of Oral Diagno- 
sis, D.D.S., Columbia University, 1957. 

Michael W. O'Riordan, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Pediatric Dentistry, B.A., 
Hope College, 1969; D.D.S., University 
of Michigan, 1973; M.S., 1975. 



Yaromyr Oryshkevych, Lecturer in Microbi- 
ology, M.S., Baylor University, 1969; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1971. 

C. Daniel Overholser, Jr., Assistant Profes- 
sor of Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University of 
Notre Dame, 1966; D.D.S., Indiana Uni- 
versity, 1970; M.S.D., 1972. 

David G. Owen, Associate Professor of 
Pediatric Dentistry, A.B., Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1960; D.D.S., McGill University, 
1964; A.M., University of Chicago, 1970. 

Jon K. Park, Associate Professor of Oral 
Diagnosis, D.D.S., University of Missouri, 
1964; B.A., Wichita State University, 
1969; M.S., University of Missouri, 1971. 

M. Elaine Parker, Instructor of Dental Hy- 
giene 

Michael I. Pascal, Clinical Instructor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1970; D.D.S., 1976. 

Kate G. Perez, Research Instructor of Den- 
tal Education, B.S., Prairie View College, 
1943. 

Joaquin M. Perez-Febles, Clinical Instructor 
of Periodontics, B.S., Colegio Presbiteri- 
ano "La Progressive", 1956; D.D.S., 
Georgetown University, 1965. 

Douglas E. Peterson, Assistant Professor 
of Oral Diagnosis, D.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1972; Ph.D., 1976. 

George W. Piavis, Professor of Anatomy, 
A.B., Western Maryland College, 1948; 
M.Ed., 1952; Ph.D., Duke University, 
1958. 

David N. Plessett, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Periodontics, B.A., Pennsylva- 
nia State University, 1949; D.D.S., Tem- 
ple University, 1954. 

Charles T. Pridgeon, Professor of Periodon- 
tics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1935. 

D. Vincent Provenza, Professor of Anatomy, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 
1941; Ph.D., 1952. 

Edward P. Quarantillo, Associate Professor 
of Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1938. 

Harriet K. Rabin, Clinical Instructor of Den- 
tal Hygiene, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1974. 

Ellen O. Radebaugh, Instructor of Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1974. 



65 



Wilbur O. Ramsey, Professor of Removable 
Prosthodontics, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1943. 

Marion S. Ratliff, Associate Professor of 
Periodontics, B.A., University of Iowa, 
1960; D.D.S., 1966; M.S., 1973. 

Errol L. Reese, Associate Professor of Re- 
movable Prosthodontics, B.S., Fairmont 
State College, 1960; D.D.S., West Vir- 
ginia University, 1963; M.S., University of 
Detroit, 1968. 

Francis J. Reeves, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1955. 

Maurice S. Rodgers, Associate Professor 
of Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S., 
University of Iowa, 1938. 

Walter A. Rodriguez C, D.D.S., Clinical 
Field Instructor. 

Vincent C. Rogers, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1966; D.D.S., 1971; M.P.H., The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1975. 

Morris Roseman, Associate Professor of 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1942; M.A., 1943; Ph.D., 
Duke University, 1949. 

Martin Rosensky, D.D.S., Clinical Field In- 
structor. 

Edward R. Roth, Clinical Instructor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., University of 
Delaware, 1970; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1974. 

Linda E. Rubinstein, Instructor of Dental 
Hygiene, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1976. 

Frieda G. Rudo, Professor of Pharmacol- 
ogy, A.B., Goucher College, 1944; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1960; Ph.D., 
1963; D.Sc, Goucher College, 1976. 

George W. Rupprecht, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Endodontics, B.S., Dickinson 
College, 1963; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1967. 

Norman C. Rutter, Jr., Associate Clinical 
Professor of Oral Health Care Delivery, 
B.S., College of William and Mary, 1953; 
D.D.S., Virginia Commonwealth Univer- 
sity, 1959; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1964. 

Karen L. Rynarzewski, Clinical Instructor of 
Orthodontics, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1975; A.A., Community College of 
Baltimore, 1977. 



66 



J. Karl Sachs, Clinical Instructor of Oral 
Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1974. 

Myron H. Sachs, Associate Clinical Profes- 
sor of Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., 
Columbia University, 1939. 

Orlando R. Sanidad, Clinical Instructor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, D.M.D., Uni- 
versity of the East (Philippines), 1960; 
B.A., Ohio State University, 1969; D.D.S., 
1972. 

John D. Santacroce, Clinical Instructor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., St. 
Francis College, 1970; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1974. 

Ramesh C. Sardana, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Orthodontics, B.Sc, University 
of Agra (India), 1953; B.D.S., University 
of Lucknow (India), 1960; M.S., University 
of Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 1969. 

Lawrence E. Scheitler, Clinical Instructor of 
Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University of Illinois, 
1971; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1975. 

Frederick A. Schoenbrodt, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Orthodontics, B.A., Gettys- 
burg College, 1965; D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1969; M.S., Georgetown Uni- 
versity, 1975. 

Earle M. Schulz, Jr., Associate Clinical 
Professor of Pediatric Dentistry, D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1962; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Iowa, 1972. 

Howard E. Schunick, Associate Clinical 
Professor of Endodontics, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., 1962. 

Harry B. Schwartz, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Removable Prosthodontics, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; 
D.D.S., 1965. 

Lynne Schwartz, R.D.H., Clinical Field In- 
structor 

Ronald J. Scornavacca, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Orthodontics, B.S., Villanova 
University, 1964; D.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1968. 

Werner Seibel, Associate Professor of Anat- 
omy, B.A., Brooklyn College, 1965; M.A 
Hofstra University, 1968; Ph.D., Virginia 
Commonwealth University, 1972. 

Sylvan Shane, D.D.S., Clinical Field In- 
structor. 



Donald E. Shay, Professor of Microbiology, 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; Ph.D., 
1943. 

Preston G. Shelton, Associate Professor of 
Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., John Carroll 
University, 1963; D.D.S., University of 
Michigan, 1967; M.S., University of Ne- 
braska, 1971. 

Eli M. Shulman, Associate Clinical Profes- 
sor of Oral Health Care Delivery, A.B., 
Ohio State University, 1942; D.D.S., 
1947. 

Arnold J. Sindler, Clinical Instructor of Per- 
iodontics, B.S., The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1966; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1976. 

J. Steven Skupas, D.D.S., Clinical Field 
Instructor 

Mary Y. Smith, Instructor of Oral Surgery, 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1973. 

Merrill J. Snyder, Lecturer in Microbiology, 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1950. 

Thomas L. Snyder, Assistant Professor of 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., St. Jo- 
sephs College, 1967; D.M.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1971; M.B.A., 1974. 

Theodore S. Sobkov, Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics, B.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1958; D.D.S., 1962. 

Rosalynde K. Soble, Assistant Professor of 
Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1944; M.S.W., 1965; 
Ph.D., 1976. 

Steven M. Somers, Assistant Professor of 
Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Univer- 
sity of Richmond, 1970; D.D.S., Virginia 
Commonwealth University, 1974. 

William S. Spicer, Jr., Lecturer in Oral 
Diagnosis, M.D., University of Kansas, 
1949. 

Roger J. Spott, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Endodontics, B.S., Western Reserve 
University, 1966; D.D.S., 1968. 

Leah M. Staling, Assistant Research Pro- 
fessor of Physiology, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1944; M.S., 1952. 

Arthur Stein, Assistant Professor of Ortho- 
dontics, D.D.S., Temple University, 1970. 

David H. Steiner, Clinical Instructor of Oral 
Diagnosis, D.D.S., State University of 
New York, 1970. 



James R. Swancar, Associate Professor of 
Oral Pathology, B.A., Western Reserve 
University, 1952; D.D.S., 1956; M.S., 
1963. 

Edgar Sweren, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Orthodontics, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1954. 

D. Robert Swinehart, Clinical Professor of 
Orthodontics, A.B., Dartmouth College, 
1933; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 
1937. 

Robert J. Sydiskis, Associate Professor of 
Microbiology, B.A., University of Bridge- 
port, 1961; Ph.D., Northwestern Univer- 
sity, 1965. 

Kristen H. Talbott, Assistant Professor of 
Dental Hygiene, B.S., University of 
Bridgeport, 1973; M.S., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1975. 

Van P. Thompson, Assistant Professor of 
Basic Dental Science, B.S., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute, 1966; Ph.D., 1971. 

Barbara J. Thunberg, Lecturer in Pediatric 
Dentistry, B.S., North Dakota State Uni- 
versity, 1972; M.Ed., Tufts University, 
1975. 

Paul D. Thut, Associate Professor of Phar- 
macology, A.B., Hamilton College, 1965; 
M.S., University of Rhode Island, 1968; 
Ph.D., Dartmouth College, 1971. 

Donald M. Tilghman, Associate Professor 
of Oral Surgery, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1958; D.D.S., 1961. 

William J. Trepp, Clinical Instructor of Or- 
thodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1971; D.D.S., 1975. 

John Vandenberge, D.D.S., Clinical Field 
Instructor 

Raoul C. Vanden Bosche, Assistant Clinical 
Professor of Fixed Restorative Dentistry, 
A.B., College of the Holy Cross, 1962; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1966. 

Jack D. Vandermer, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Oral Diagnosis, B.S., Pennsyl- 
vania State University, 1963; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1967; M.Ed., 1973. 

Philip C. Wagley, Assistant Professor of 
Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1943; M.P.H., 
The Johns Hopkins University, 1971. 

Mark L. Wagner, Associate Professor of 
Pediatric Dentistry, A.B., Birmingham 
Southern College, 1959; D.M.D., Univer- 
sity of Alabama, 1963. 



67 



Oswaldene E. Walker, Instructor of Perio- 
dontics, B.S., Howard University, 1961; 
M.S., 1966; D.D.S., 1972. 

Harvey Webb, Jr., Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., 
Howard University, 1956; D.D.S., 1960; 
M.S., 1962; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1967. 

Stephen A. Weiner, Clinical Instructor of 
Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1965; D.D.S., 1969. 

Jerome J. Weinstein, Associate Clinical 
Professor of Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., 
University of Maryand, 1958; D.D.S., 
1962. 

Paul Weinstein, Lecturer in Oral Health 
Care Delivery, B.S., City College of New 
York, 1949; L.L.B., New York University, 
1952. 

John I. White, Professor of Physiology, 
B.A., University of Illinois, 1939; Ph.D., 
Rutgers University, 1950. 

George H. Williams, III, Assistant Professor 
of Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Tus- 
culum College, 1962; D.D.S., University 
of Maryland, 1966. 

Robert E. Williams, Assistant Professor of 
Orthodontics, B.S., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1965; D.M.D., 1969. 

Dennis E. Winson, Associate Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Periodontics, B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1961; D.D.S., Georgetown Uni- 
versity, 1965. 

Morton Wood, Assistant Professor of Fixed 
Restorative Dentistry, B.A., American In- 
ternational College, 1965; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1969. 

Frederick N. Wyman, D.D.S., Clinical Field 
Instructor 

Karl J. Zeren, Clinical Instructor of Perio- 
dontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 
1969; D.D.S., 1975. 

Robert M. Zupnik, Clinical Professor of 
Periodontics, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1954; D.D.S., Georgetown Univer- 
sity, 1958; M.S.D., Boston University, 
1964. 



ASSOCIATE STAFF. 

Richard G. Baier, Assistant in Removable 
Prosthodontics. 

John W. Britt, Assistant in Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry. 

Ambrose K. Charles, Research Assistant in 
Microbiology, B.S., University of Kerala 
(India), 1963; M.S., University of Baroda 
(India), 1970; Ph.D., University of Delhi 
(India), 1974. 

Philip Holland, Assistant to the Dean for 
Fiscal and Personnel Matters. 

Tony M. Kavali, Dental Clinic Administrator. 

John A. Kichi, Coordinator of Telecommun- 
ications, B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 
1969; M.A., Michigan State University, 
1972. 

William F. King, Jr., Assistant in Removable 
Prosthodontics. 

Lawrence W. Kreutzer, Assistant in Ortho- 
dontics. 

Myra R. Land, Administrative Assistant, Of- 
fice of Academic Affairs, B.A., Goucher 
College, 1956. 

Robert J. Organ, Associate in Periodontics. 

Joseph A. Rutherford, Assistant in Remov- 
able Prosthodontics. 

Nell M. Savopoulos, Administrative Assist- 
ant to the Dean, B.A., Mary Washington 
College, 1953. 

Frederick Suls, Assistant in Fixed Restora- 
tive Dentistry. 

Earl F. Williams, Research Associate i 
Basic Dental Science. 



68 



DEANS OF DENTAL SCHOOLS IN BALTIMORE 

BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

Chapin A. Harris 1840-1841 

Thomas E. Bond 1841-1842 

Washington R. Handy 1842-1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853-1865 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1865-1882 

Richard B. Winder 1882-1894 

M. Whilldin Foster 1894-1914 

William G. Foster 1914-1923 



MARYLAND DENTAL COLLEGE 

1873-1878 

(Merged with Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 1878) 

Richard B. Winder 1873-1878 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas 1882-1911 

Timothy O. Heatwole 191 1-1923 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT 
BALTIMORE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1895-1913 
(Merged with University of Maryland in 1913) 

J. William Smith 1895-1901 

William A. Montell 1901-1903 

J. Edgar Orrison 1903-1904 

J. William Smith 1904-1913 



BALTIMORE COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

(Baltimore College of Dental Surgery consolidated with University of Maryland in 1923) 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1923-1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924-1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1953-1963 

John J. Salley 1963-1974 

Errol L. Reese (Acting Dean) 1974-1975 

Errol L. Reese 1975- 

69 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OFFICERS 
1977-78 

President 

Dr. Michael H. Ventura 

2069 East Belvedere Avenue 

Baltimore, Maryland 21239 
President-Elect 

Dr. Charles L. Page, Jr. 

8403 Loch Raven Boulevard 

Baltimore, Maryland 21204 
First Vice-President 

Dr. George H. Williams, III 

12116 Jerusalem Road 

Kingsville, Maryland 21087 
Second Vice-President 

Dr. Robert V. Bates 

10634 York Road 

Cockeysville, Maryland 21030 

Secretary 

Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio 
6810 North Charles Street 
Towson, Maryland 21204 

Recording Secretary 

Dr. Robert W. Haroth 

Dental School, University of Maryland 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
Treasurer 

Dr. J. Philip Norris 

1207 Frederick Road 

Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

Editor 

Dr. Kyrle W. Preis 

Mt. Vista and Belair Roads 

Kingsville, Maryland 21087 
Historian-Archivist 

Mr. Gardner P. H. Foley 

4407 Sedgwick Road 

Baltimore, Maryland 21210 
Past-President (Ex-Officio) 

Dr. Conrad L. Inman, Jr. 

Medical Arts Building 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



UNIVERSITY ALUMNI COUNCIL 
REPRESENTATIVES 

Dr. Clayton S. McCarl— 1978 

28 Ridge Road 

Greenbelt, Maryland 20770 
Dr. James R. Sullivan— 1979 

419 Burnt Mills Avenue 

Silver Spring, Maryland 20901 
Dr. Harry W. F. Dressel— 1980 

6340 Frederick Road 

Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

ALTERNATES 

Dr. D. Michael Brown 

Suite 211, Capitol Plaza Building 

Landover Hills, Maryland 20784 
Dr. Robert P. Fleishman 

1134 York Road 

Lutherville, Maryland 21093 
Dr. Gary P. Schoppert 

600 Wyndhurst Avenue 

Baltimore, Maryland 21210 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Michael H. Ventura 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Charles L. Page, Jr. 

Baltimore, Maryland 
George H. Williams, III 

Kingsville, Maryland 
Robert V. Bates 

Cockeysville, Maryland 
Joseph P. Cappuccio 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Robert W. Haroth 

Baltimore, Maryland 
J. Philip Norris 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Gardner P. H. Foley 

Baltimore, Maryland 
Kyrle W. Preis 

Kingsville, Maryland 
Conrad L. Inman, Jr. 

Baltimore, Maryland 



70 



ELECTED MEMBERS 

Don N. Brotman— 1978 
Horizon House 
Baltimore, Maryland 21202 

Albert L. Ousborne— 1 978 

714 York Road 

Baltimore, Maryland 21204 
Robert W. Haroth— 1979 

Dental School, University of Maryland 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
Joe N. Price— 1979 

6921 Annapolis Road 

Landover Hills, Maryland 20784 
Hector P. DiNardo— 1980 

York Road and Greenmeadow Drive 

Timonium, Maryland 21093 
Raymond W. Palmer, Jr. — 1980 

201 Baltimore and Annapolis Boulevard, 

Northwest 

Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 



ENDOWMENT FUND TRUSTEES 

TRUSTEES EX-OFFICIO 

Michael H. Ventura, President 
Charles L. Page, Jr., President-Elect 
Joseph P. Cappuccio, Secretary 
J. Philip Norris, Treasurer 
Errol L. Reese, Dean 

ELECTED TRUSTEES 

Alex L. Boro— 1 978 

201 South Southwood Avenue 

Annapolis, Maryland 21401 
Jack M. Eskow— 1978 

147 Market Street 

Perth Amboy, New Jersey 08861 
Don N. Brotman-1979 

Horizon House 

Baltimore, Maryland 21202 
William R. Patteson— 1 979 

Medical Arts Building 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
Paul Hoffman— 1980 

10401 Old Georgetown Road 

Bethesda, Maryland 20014 
William Strahan— 1980 

220 University Boulevard, West 

Silver Spring, Maryland 20901 



71 



APPENDIX 



POLICY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND ON ACCESS TO AND 
RELEASE OF STUDENT DATA/ 
INFORMATION 

General Statement 

The University of Maryland has the re- 
sponsibility for effectively supervising any 
access to and/or release of official data/ 
information about its students. Certain items 
of information about individual students are 
fundamental to the educational process and 
must be recorded. This recorded informa- 
tion concerning students must be used only 
for clearly-defined purposes, must be safe- 
guarded and controlled to avoid violations 
of personal privacy, and must be appropri- 
ately disposed of when the justification for 
its collection and retention no longer exists. 

In this regard, the University is committed 
to protecting to the maximum extent possi- 
ble the right of privacy of all individuals 
about whom it holds information, records 
and files. Access to and release of such 
records is restricted to the student con- 
cerned, to others with the student's written 
consent, to officials within the University, to 
a court of competent jurisdiction and other- 
wise pursuant to law. 



Access 

All official information collected and main- 
tained in the University identifiable with an 
individual student will be made available for 
inspection and review at the written request 
of that student subject to certain exceptions. 

For purposes of access to records at the 
University of Maryland, a student enrolled 
(or formerly enrolled) for academic credit or 
audit at any campus of the University shall 
have access to official records concerning 
him on any campus on which he is or has 
been enrolled. 

The personal files of members of the 
faculty and the staff which concern stu- 
dents, including private correspondence, 
and notes which refer to students, are not 
regarded as official records of the Univer- 
sity. This includes notes intended for the 
personal use of the faculty and never in- 
tended to be official records of the Univer- 
sity. 



A request for general access to all official 
records, files and data maintained by a 
campus, must be made in writing to the 
coordinator of records or to other person(s) 
as designated by the Chancellor at that 
particular campus. A request for access to 
official data maintained in a particular office 
may be made to the administrative head of 
that office. 

When a student (or former student) ap- 
pears at a given office and requests access 
to the University records about himself, 

1 . The student must provide proper iden- 
tification verifying that he is the person 
whose record is being accessed. 

2. The designated staff person(s) must 
supervise the review of the contents 
of the record with the student. 

3. Inspection and review shall be permit- 
ted within a period not to exceed 45 
days from the date of the student's 
request. 

4. The student will be free to make notes 
concerning the contents but no mate- 
rial will be removed from the record at 
the time. 

Under normal circumstances, the student 
is entitled to receive a copy only of his 
permanent academic record. A reasonable 
administrative fee may be charged for pro- 
viding copies of this or other items. 

Record keeping personnel and members 
of the faculty and staff with administrative 
assignment may have access to records 
and files for internal educational purposes 
as well as for routinely necessary clerical 
administrative and statistical purposes as 
required by the duties of their jobs. The 
name and position of the official responsible 
for the maintenance of each type of educa 
tional record may be obtained from the 
coordinator of records or other person ap- 
pointed by the Chancellor on each campus. 

Any other access allowed by law mus 
be recorded showing the legitimate educa 
tional or other purpose and the signature o 
the person gaining access. The studen 
concerned shall be entitled to review thi 
information. 

Release of Information 

Except with the prior written consent 
the student (or former student) concerned 
or as required by federal and state law, n( 
information in any student file may b< 
released to any individual (including pai 



72 



ents, spouse, or other students) or organi- 
zation with the exception of information 
defined as "Public Information." 

When disclosure of any personally identi- 
fiable data/information from University rec- 
ords about a student is demanded pursuant 
to court order or lawfully issued subpoena, 
the staff member receiving such order shall 
immediately notify the student concerned in 
writing prior to compliance with such order 
or subpoena. 

Data/information from University records 
about students will be released for approved 
research purposes only if the identity of the 
student involved is fully protected. 

A record will be kept of all such releases. 

Information from University records may 
be released to appropriate persons in con- 
nection with an emergency if the knowledge 
of such information is necessary to protect 
the health or safety of a student or other 
persons. 

Public Information 

The following items are considered public 
data/information and may be disclosed by 
the University in response to inquiries con- 
cerning individual students, whether the in- 
quiries are in person, in writing or over the 
telephone. 

1. Name 

2. Affirmation of whether currently en- 
rolled 

3. Campus location 

Unless the student has officially filed a 
request with the campus registrar that dis- 
closure not be made without his written 
permission, the following items in addition 
to those above are considered public infor- 
nation and may be included in appropriate 
University/campus directories and publica- 
tions and may be disclosed by designated 
staff members on each campus in response 
':o inquiries concerning individual students, 
whether the inquiries are in person, in 
Writing, or over the telephone. 

1. School, college, department, major or 
division 

2. Dates of enrollment 

3. Degrees received 

4. Honors received 

5. Local address and phone number 

6. Home address (permanent) 

7. Participation in officially recognized ac- 
tivities and sports 

8. Weight and height of members of 
athletic teams 



The release of public information as de- 
scribed above may be limited by an individ- 
ual campus policy. 

Letters of Appraisal 

Candid appraisals and evaluations of per- 
formance and potential are an essential 
part of the educational process. Clearly, the 
provision of such information to prospective 
employers, to other educational institutions, 
or to other legitimately concerned outside 
individuals and agencies is necessary and 
in the interest of the particular student. 

Data/information which was part of Uni- 
versity records prior to January 1, 1975 
and which was collected and maintained as 
confidential information, will not be dis- 
closed to students. Should a student desire 
access to a confidential letter of appraisal 
received prior to January 1, 1975, the 
student shall be advised to have the writer 
of that appraisal notify, in writing, the con- 
cerned records custodian of the decision as 
to whether or not the writer is willing to 
have the appraisal made available for the 
student's review. Unless a written response 
is received approving a change of status in 
the letter, the treatment of the letter as a 
confidential document shall continue. 

Documents of appraisal relating to stu- 
dents collected by the University or any 
department or office of the University on or 
after January 1, 1975 will be maintained 
confidentially only if a waiver of the right of 
access has been executed by the student. 
In the absence of such a waiver, all such 
documents will be available for student 
inspection and review. 

All references, recommendations, evalu- 
ations and other written notations or com- 
ments, originated prior to January 1, 1975, 
where the author by reason of custom, 
common practice, or specific assurance 
thought or had good reason to believe that 
such documents and materials would be 
confidential, will be maintained as confiden- 
tial, unless the author consents in writing to 
waive such confidentiality. 

If a student files a written waiver with the 
department or office concerned, letters of 
appraisal received pursuant to that waiver 
will be maintained confidentially. Forms will 
be available for this purpose. 

Challenges to the Record 

Every student shall have the opportunity 
to challenge any item in his file which he 
considers to be inaccurate, misleading or 



73 



otherwise inappropriate data. A student 
shall initiate a challenge by submitting a 
request in writing for the deletion or correc- 
tion of the particular item. The request shall 
be made to the custodian of the particular 
record in question. 

If the custodian and the student involved 
are unable to resolve the matter to the 
satisfaction of both parties, the written re- 
quest for deletion or correction shall be 
submitted by the student to the coordinator 
of records, or other such person as desig- 
nated by the Chancellor, who shall serve 
as the hearing officer. The student shall be 
given the opportunity for a hearing, at which 
the student may present oral or written 
justification for the request for deletion or 
correction. The hearing officer may obtain 
such other information as he deems appro- 
priate for use in the hearing and shall give 
the student a written decision on the matter 
within thirty (30) days from the conclusion 
of the hearing. If the decision of the hearing 
officer is to deny the deletion or correction 
of an item in the student's file, the student 
shall be entitled to submit a written state- 
ment to the hearing officer presenting his 
position with regard to the item. Both the 
written decision of the hearing officer and 
the statement submitted by the student 
shall be inserted in the student's file. The 
decision of the hearing officer shall be final. 

Grades may be challenged under this 
procedure only on the basis of the accuracy 
of their transcription. 

Exceptions to the Policy 

It is the position of the University that 
certain data/information maintained in var- 
ious offices of the University is not subject 
to the provisions of this policy with regard 
to inspection, review, challenge, correction 
or deletion. 

a. Statements submitted by parent/ 
guardian or spouse in support of 
financial aid or residency determina- 
tions are considered to be confiden- 
tial between those persons and the 
University, and are not subject to the 
provisions of this policy except with 
the written consent of the persons 
involved. Such documents are not 
regarded as part of the student's 
official record. 

b. University employment records of 
students are not included in this 
policy, except as provided under Ar- 



ticle 76A of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland. 

c. With regard to general health data, 
only that data/information which is 
used by the University in making a 
decision regarding the student's sta- 
tus is subject to review by the stu- 
dent under this policy. Written psy- 
chiatric or psychological case notes 
which form the basis for diagnosis, 
recommendations, or treatment plans 
remain privileged information not ac- 
cessible to the student. Such case 
notes are not considered to be part 
of official University records. To en- 
sure the availability of correct and 
helpful interpretations of any psycho- 
logical test scores, notes or other 
evaluative or medical materials, the 
contents of these files for an individ- 
ual student may be reviewed by that 
student only in consultation with a 
professional staff member of the spe- 
cific department involved. 

d. Records relating to a continuing or 
active investigation by the campus 
security office, or records of said 
office not relating to the student's 
status with the University are not 
subject to this policy. 

e. No student is entitled to see infor- 
mation or records that pertain to 
another student, to parents, or tc 
other third parties. A student is enti- 
tled to review only that portion of an 
official record or file that pertains tcl 
him or her. 

Notice 

Notice of these policies and procedure,' 
will be published by the University. 

The foregoing statement of University; 
policy becomes effective immediately, buj 
should be regarded as tentative pendinci 
the issuance of federal regulations am 
guidelines or amendments in the applicable 
laws. 

The masculine gender of personal pror 
ouns in this document includes the feminin 
gender. 

Approved by the President's Administratk 
Council, 2/3/75. 

In accordance with this University 
Maryland policy on Access to and Releas 
of Student Data/Information, forms an 
available in the Registrar's Office and th 
Office of Academic Affairs. 



74 



CAMPUS MAP 



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1 AY1 TTE ST 




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OUUUUUU 




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f — ^ 






BUILDING KEY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



1 Allied Health Professions Building, 
32 S Greene Street 

Medical Technology. School of 
Pharmacy, Physical Therapy 
Radiologic Technology classrooms. 
offices, laboratones 

2 Alpha House, 828 N Eutaw Street 
(off campus) 

3 Baltimore Union, 621 W Lombard 
Street 

Cafetena. student housing, meeting 
rooms for students and faculty, 
lounges, game room. Synapse 

4 Bressler Research Building, 29 S 
Greene Street 

Medical school research labs. Balti 
more offices of the university's 
Board of Regents 

5 Walter P Carter Center 630 W 
Fayette Street 

The university uses this facility 
jointly with the Inner City Mental 
Health Program and the State De 
partment of Mental Hygiene 

6 Community Pediatnc Center. 412 
W Redwood Street (off campusl 
Innovative program of comprehen 
sive health care for children in 
southwestern health distnct Feder 
ally funded 

7 Davidge Hall 522 W Lombard 
Street 

Built in 1812 and designed by Rob 
ert Carey Long Sr . who used the 
Pantheon in Rome as his model 
The oldest building in the nation 
used continuously for medical edu 
cation The university's Medical 
Alumni Association plans to restore 
the building to its onginal state and 
open it to the public as a medical 



Dunning Hall. 636 W Lombard 
Street 

School of Pharmacy classrooms and 
offices, drug manufactunng lab. poi- 
son information center 



Fayette Street Garage 633 W Fay 
ette Street 

Gray Laboratory, 520 Rear W 
Lombard Street 

Medical school offices and labs. 
Physical Therapy offices. Personnel 
training room 

Hayden Hams Hall. 666 W Balti- 
more Street 

Baltimore College of Dental Sur 
gery. Dental School, clinics, class- 
rooms, labs, offices 
Health Sciences Computer Center. 
610 W Lombard Street 
Computer Center, pharmacy school 
offices and labs. Medical Technol 
ogy labs. Division of Clinical Investi- 
gation. Office of Student Affairs 
Health Sciences Library. Ill S 
Greene Street 

Main library for all professional 
schools except the School of Law 
Includes histoncal book collection 
and computenzed circulation and 
information services 
Howard Hall. 660 W Redwood 
Street 

Central Administration offices, med 
ical school classrooms, offices, labs 
Howard Hall Tower. 655 W Balti- 
more Street 

Medical school classrooms, offices, 
labs Administrative offices of the 
medical school, including the office 
of dean and vice chancellor 
Institute of Psychiatry and Human 
Behavior 645 W Redwood Street 
(E. F and G wings of the hospital) 
The medical school's center for psy 
chiatnc teaching and research as 
well as inpatient and outpatient 
care 

Kelly Memonal Building. 650 W 
Lombard Street 

Headquarters of Maryland Pharma 
ceutical Association B Olive Cole 
Museum 



18 Lane Hall, 500 W Baltimore Street 
School of Law classrooms, offices, 
library. Developmental Disabilities 
Law Clinic 

19 Legal Services Clinic, 116 N Paca 
Street 

20 Lombard Building. 511 W Lorn 
bard Street 

Bookstore. University Relations 

21 Maryland Institute for Emergency 
Medical Services. 22 S Greene 
Street 

The first major trauma program in 
the nation, combining multidisciph 
nary teaching and research with ex 
pert round-the clock care for the 
cntically ill and injured in the state 

22 Medical School Teaching Facility. 
10 S Pine Street 

Medical school classrooms, offices, 
research labs, animal facility. Office 
of Medical Education. Illustrative 
Services 

23 Medical Technology Building. 31 S 
Greene Street 

Medical school offices, labs 

24 Mencken House. 1524 Hollins 
Street (off campus) 

25 Methadone Program. 104 N 
Greene Street (off campus) 

26 National Pituitary Agency. 210 W 
Fayette Street (off campus) 
Under contract with the National 
Institutes of Health, the University 
of Maryland administers the NPA. 
which is the official agency for col 
lection and distnbution of human 
pituitary hormones for research pur 
poses 

27 Newman Center. 712 W Lombard 
Street 

28 Nilsson House. 826 N Eutaw Street 
(off campus) 

29 Parsons Residence Hall for Women. 
622 W Lombard Street 

30 Pratt Street Garage and Athletic Fa 
cility. 646 W Pratt Street 



31 Redwood Hall. 721 W Redwood 
Street 

Division of Alcoholism and Drug 
Abuse offices, clinical areas 

32 School of Nursing Building, 655 W 
Lombard Street 

Nursing school classrooms, offices 
Xi School of Social Work and Admin 
istration Building. 525 W Redwood 
Street 

Office of the chancellor School of 
Social Work and Community Plan 
ning classrooms, offices 

34 State Medical Examiner's Building. 
1 1 1 Penn Street 

35 Stroke Center. 412 W Redwood 
Street (off campus) 

36 Temporary Academic Building, 601 
Rear W Lombard Street 

School of Social Work and Com 
munity Planning classrooms, offices 

37 Tuerk House. 106 N Greene Street 
(off campus) 

Residential facility for alcoholism 
programs of the University of Mary 
land Hospital I Also Alpha and Nils 
son Houses ) 

38 University College. 520 W Lorn 
bard Street 

Offers degree and non degree edu 
cational programs Juvenile Law 
Clinic 

39 University Garage. 701 W Red 
wood Street 

Helistop 

40 University of Maryland Hospital. 22 
S Greene Street 

41 Western Health Clinic. 700 W 
Lombard Street 

42 Whitehurst Hall. 624 W Lombard 
Street 

Graduate School office, nursing, 
pharmacy, social work and commu 
nity planning offices, classrooms 



75 



Index 

Academic policies 18 

Accelerated Professional Training 

Program 35 

Administrative Officers 57 

Admission/application: 

dental program 16 

dental hygiene program 41 

graduate program 45 

postgraduate programs 46 

with advanced standing 17 

Alumni Association 70 

Awards: 

dental students 55 

dental hygiene students 55 

Baltimore Union 52 

Calendar 7 

Campus Map 75 

Combined degree programs: 

undergraduate 18 

graduate 45 

Continuing education program ... 50 
Course descriptions: 

accelerated professional training 35 

dental program 24 

dental hygiene program 43 

postgraduate programs 46 

Curriculum: 

dental 22 

dental hygiene 40 

Dental Admissions Test 17 

Dental Hygiene Admissions Test 41 

Departments of instruction 24 

Disclosure of information policy . . 72 
Dress code: 

dental students 20 

dental hygiene students 42 

Employment opportunities: 

dental 21 

dental hygiene 43 

Expenses: 

dental students 20 

dental hygiene students 42 

Faculty and staff 58 

Financial aid 13 

Graduate programs 45 



Graduation requirements: 

dental program 20 

dental hygiene program 42 

diploma application 12 

early graduation 20 

Health requirements 12 

Housing 52 

Insurance: 

health 12 

professional liability 12 

Lecture funds 7 

Library 6 

Minimester 19 

Museum 6 

Organizations 53 

Publications 52 

Registration 8 

Resident status 8 

Specially Tailored Educational 

Program 19 

Student Judicial Policy 21 

Student Health Service 52 

Transcripts 11 

Tuition 9 

Withdrawal 11 



76 



At the Dedication of Hayden-Harris Hall on March 5, 1971 



"Within these stones and bricks, healing is to be administered, 
and no less important, human relationships developed be- 
tween teachers and students and between students and 
patients. If ever patients are regarded as clinical material, this 
building will have been degraded and its use corrupted. We 
must never forget that the word patient comes from the Latin 
root which means to suffer. Clinical material does not suffer. 
Human beings do." 

Dr. Louis L Kaplan 

Chairman of the Board of Regents 

University of Maryland 




^=3 



iGh: 



. -1982 






. 



DENTAL SCHOOL BULLETIN 
1980-1982 



Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Dental School 
University of Maryland at Baltimore 



CONTENTS 



General Information 1 

Matriculation Policies and Procedures 6 

Scholarship and Loan Funds 13 

The Dental Program 17 

The Dental Hygiene Program 42 

Advanced Education Programs 51 

Student Life 56 

Administration and Faculty 62 

Alumni Association 76 

Statement of Affirmative Action 79 

Campus Map 80 

Index 81 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




Statement of Philosophy 

As the art and science of dentistry have evolved since its origin in 1840, the dental profes- 
sion has demonstrated a variety of achievements. Technical excellence in clinical proce- 
dures has been augmented by an improved understanding of human biology. 

The Dental School's programs focus on the three basic aims of the academic community - 
teaching, research and service. As a university discipline, dental education must meet and 
surpass its previous accomplishments to ensure the continued advancement of dentistry. 
While the process of education must remain anchored firmly to time-tested principles, it 
must also continually extend itself to uncover hidden truths within these same principles 
and thereby contribute to man's progress toward better understanding and control of his en- 
vironment. 

The School 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland at Balti- 
more has the distinction of being the oldest dental college in the world. Formal education 
to prepare students for the practice of dentistry originated in 1840 with the establishment of 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. The chartering of the school by the General As- 
sembly of Maryland on February 1 , 1 840 represented the culmination of the efforts of Dr. 
Horace H. Hayden and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, two dental practitioners who recognized the 
need for systematic formal education as the foundation for a scientific and serviceable den- 
tal profession. Together they played a major role in establishing and promoting formal den- 
tal education, and in the development of dentistry as a profession. 

Convinced that support for a formal course in dental education would not come from 
within medical schools, Dr. Hayden undertook the establishment of an independent dental 
college. Dr. Harris, an energetic and ambitious young man who had come to Baltimore in 
1830 to study under Dr. Hayden, was active in the effort to found the College, relieving 
Hayden (who was seventy at the time) of many of the details involved in such an endeavor. 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery served as a prototype for dental schools gradually 
established in other American cities and originated the pattern of modern dental education, 
with equal emphasis on sound knowledge of general medicine and development of the 
skills of dentistry. Through its contributions to dental and medical progress and through the 
prominent role of its faculty and graduates in the development of the profession, the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery has exerted a remarkable influence on professional dentis- 
try. 

The present dental school evolved through a series of consolidations involving the Mary- 
land Dental College, which merged with the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 1878; 
the Dental Department of the University of Maryland, founded in 1882; and the Dental De- 
partment of the Baltimore Medical College, which merged with the University of Maryland 
Dental Department in 1913. The final consolidation took place in 1923, when the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery and the University of Maryland Dental School were com- 
bined to create a distinct department of the University under state supervision and control. 

In 1970 the Dental School moved into Hayden-Harris Hall, a new five-story building with 
modern equipment and treatment facilities. The Dental School today offers one of the finest 
programs of dental education in the world. Continuing efforts are made to provide educa- 
tional and training experiences consistent with evolving concepts and advances in the deliv- 
ery of dental health care. 

In addition to the D.D.S. program, the School offers a baccalaureate degree program in 
dental hygiene designed to prepare students for careers in dental hygiene practice, teaching 
and other areas related to this important dental auxiliary field. Graduate programs leading 
to a master's or doctoral degree in anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, oral pathology 
and physiology are also offered. A large number of faculty members are actively engaged 
in research; research opportunities are available to dental students as well as to graduate 
and postgraduate students. 




Postgraduate training is offered in the specialty areas of endodontics, orthodontics, oral sur- 
gery, pedodontics, periodontics and prosthodontics. A program leading to the degree Mas- 
ter of Science in Oral Biology is available to candidates seeking certificates of advanced 
education in the dental specialities. In addition, a general practice residency program is of- 
fered through the Department of Dentistry of the University of Maryland Hospital. 

The School's continuing education program provides opportunities for dental and dental 
auxiliary practitioners to update their knowledge and skills. Approximately fifty courses are 
conducted annually in special facilities designed for the program. 

At the end of the 1979-80 academic year the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore will have completed 140 years of service to 
dental education. Through its graduates the School continues to fulfill the aspirations of its 
founders to provide scientifically trained professionals to serve the oral health care needs of 
society. 

The Campus 

The Dental School is located on the campus of the University of Maryland at Baltimore in 
the heart of metropolitan Baltimore. Other major units of this campus are the Graduate 
School, Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Social Work and Community 
Planning, and the University of Maryland Hospital. These professional schools and their 
service programs contribute to the health and welfare of the citizens of Maryland. The sup- 
port and utilization of the University's services by community residents in turn represent a 
vital resource for the University. 



The City 

Statistically, Baltimore is the largest city in Maryland, the seventh most populous in the na- 
tion, and site of the country's fourth largest foreign commerce seaport. The Baltimore re- 
gion has much to offer the student, from the sophistication and culture of a large, metropol- 
itan city, to the beauty and leisure of the waterfront and rural areas that surround it. 



Having been the location of many significant events in the nation's history, including the 
writing of the national anthem, Baltimore maintains a strong feeling for the past as typified 
by the many charming neighborhoods of restored houses and abundance of historic build- 
ings. 

And yet, Baltimore has become increasingly forward-thinking and is making outstanding 
progress in the revitalization and rebirth of its downtown area. A prime example is Charles 
Center, one of the early models for urban planning in the country, which incorporates a the- 
ater, hotel, shops, and series of plazas and elevated walkways that are used as settings for 
frequent fairs, concerts, art shows and festivals. Even closer to campus, one of the most 
exciting renovations is taking place in the inner harbor. When completed, some 240 acres 
surrounding the busy port will be redeveloped to include office buildings, apartments, 
schools, parks, recreational facilities — in all, an entirely new living and working complex. 

As a cultural center, Baltimore has offerings to please the most discriminating. It possesses an 
excellent symphony, a professional opera company, many professional' and semiprofessional 
theaters, the Peabody Conservatory of Music, outstanding museums, excellent libraries, and 
historical and scientific societies, the newest of which is the Maryland Academy of Sciences 
Center that opened in the inner harbor area in 1976. 

Sports fans, too, have a lot to savor in Baltimore thanks to the wide range of professional and 
collegiate teams. The city is famous, of course, for the Orioles and the Colts, but both specta- 
tors and participants will also find excellent hockey, soccer, lacrosse, basketball, horseracing, 
golf and tennis close at hand. Also nearby is the Chesapeake Bay, offering numerous water 
sports and the seafood for which Baltimore is famous. 

The Health Sciences Library 

This School is fortunate to have one of the best-equipped and organized libraries of any 
dental school in the country. The dental collection is part of the Health Sciences Library, 
which serves all professional schools on the Baltimore campus. More than 175,000 bound 
volumes and 3,200 current subscriptions to scientific periodicals in the fields of dentistry, 
medicine, nursing, pharmacy and social work are housed in a four-story library building at 
111 South Greene Street. The availability of this facility on campus enables the Dental 
School to incorporate dental literature into the curriculum, thereby promoting the student's 
use of the literature as an important source of further knowledge and development when he 
becomes a practitioner. 

A well-qualified staff of professionally trained and certified librarians is available to assist 
students in the use of the library's resources. Computerized literature searches by 
MEDLINE, the National Library of Medicine's system, are provided for students and fac- 
ulty as part of the reference service. 

The library is open 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Monday through Friday; 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 
p.m. Saturday; and 2:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Sunday, with a staff trained in reference serv- 
ices on duty most of these hours. Borrowers must show a UMAB ID badge validated for 
the current year. 

Museum of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

The Museum of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery is located in the Reading Room of 
the Independent Learning Center on the ground floor of Hayden-Harris Hall. Some special 
displays are appropriately located in other areas of the building. 

Because of its heritage from the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery and the importance 
of Baltimore in the development of professional dentistry, the Museum has developed a 
large and valuable collection of objects and specimens of historical and professional inter- 
est. Several items of national and international interest, such as George Washington's ivory 
and gold dentures, are on loan to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D. C, where 
they can enjoy a larger audience. 



Items currently on display in the Museum include dental chairs and operatories from various 
periods of dental history, instrument cabinets, early instruments, dentures representing the var- 
ious stages through which the art of dental prosthesis progressed, the Guerini cabinet contain- 
ing replicas of dental appliances from the most ancient times through the 18th Century, and 
portraits of leaders in the development of professional dentistry. 

The Museum and the Independent Learning Center are open throughout the year Monday 
through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with extended hours evenings and Saturdays 
during the regular academic year. Group tours are welcome, but arrangements must be 
made in advance by contacting the Media Specialist/Curator at (301) 528-7944. 

Special Lecture Funds 

The Grayson W. Gaver Memorial Lecture. Through the generosity of both his family and 
the School alumni, an endowed lectureship was established in memory of the late Dr. 
Grayson W. Gaver, an outstanding leader in the field of prosthodontics and a distinguished 
member of the faculty for many years. The Gaver Lecture is presented annually as part of 
Student-Faculty Day activities. 

The William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell Lecture. In 1965 two faithful alumni, Drs. William 
B. and Elizabeth S. Powell, presented the School with a generous contribution for the pur- 
pose of instituting special lectures for the benefit of the student body and faculty. The first 
lecture in the series was presented in April, 1966. These lectures provide a means of broad- 
ening the total academic program. 

In addition to these annual lectures, there are three special lectures which are presented on a 
rotating basis once every three years as part of the Commencement/Alumni Week activities: 
The John E. Fogarty Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Rhode Island Section of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery Alumni Association; The Hayden-H arris Memorial Lecture, 
sponsored by the Alumni Association: and The J. Ben Robinson Memorial Lecture, sponsored 
by the Maryland Section of the American College of Dentists. 

1980-1981 Academic Calendar 

Following is the academic calendar for 1980-81 . This schedule is subject to change, and is pro- 
vided only for general information concerning the length of terms and holidays. 
August 22-26 Freshman orientation 

August 27 First semester begins 

September 1 Labor Day (school closed) 

November 27-28 Thanksgiving recess (two days) 

December 1 2 First semester ends 

December 15-19 Exam week 

December 22-January 2 Christmas recess (ten days) 

January 5-30 Minimester 

January 15 Martin Luther King's Birthday (school closed) 

February 2 Second semester begins 

February 23 George Washington's Birthday (school closed) 

April 13-17 Spring Vacation (five days) 

May 22 Second semester ends 

May 25-28 Exam week 

May 29 Graduation 

June 29- July 24 Summer session 



MATRICULATION POLICIES AND 
PROCEDURES 





Registration Procedures 

To attend classes students are required to register each term in accordance with current reg- 
istration procedures. Fees are due and payable on the dates specified for registration. Reg- 
istration is not completed until all financial obligations are satisfied. Students who do not 
complete their registration will not be permitted to attend classes. A fee will be charged for 
late registration. 

Although the University regularly mails bills to preregistered students, it cannot assume re- 
sponsibility for their receipt. If any student does not receive a bill prior to the beginning of a 
semester in which he has preregistered, it is the student's responsibility to contact the Office of 
the Registrar or Office of the Cashier, Howard Hall, during normal business hours. 

Any enrolled student may request at registration the postponement of payment of one-half 
of the fixed charges for thirty (30) days; all other fees are due and payable. For this service 
a charge of $2.00 will be made. 

If a satisfactory settlement or agreement for settlement is not made with the Business Of- 
fice within ten days after a payment is due, the student is automatically prohibited from at- 
tending classes and will forfeit the other privileges of the Dental School. 

All checks and money orders should be made payable to the University of Maryland for the 
exact amount of the actual bill. 

No diploma, certificate or transcript of record will be issued to a student who has not made 
satisfactory settlement of his University account. 

Determination of In-State Status 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission, tuition and charge-differential pur- 
poses will be made by the University at the time a student's application for admission is under 
consideration. The determination made at that time, and any determination made thereafter 
shall prevail in each semester until the determination is successfully challenged. 

Students classified as in-state for admission, tuition and charge-differential purposes are re- 
sponsible for notifying the Office of Admissions, in writing, within fifteen (15) days of any 
change in their circumstances which might in any way affect their classification at UMAB. 

The determination of in-state status for admission, tuition and charge-differential purposes 
is the responsibility of the Office of Admissions and Registrations. Copies of the 
University's policy are available in the Admissions Office and in each dean's office. 



1980-81 Tuition and Fees 



Dental Program 

Matriculation (New Students) 

In-State 

Out-of-State 
Instructional Resources Fee 
Student Activities Fee 
Student Health Fee 
Hospitalization Insurance* 

One Person 

Two Persons 

Family 
Supporting Facilities Fee 
Student Liability Insurance 
Dormitory Fee 

(Double Occupancy) 
Graduation Fee (Seniors) 



Fall 


Spring 


Total 


$ 15.00 


$ — 


$ 15.00 


1300.00 


1300.00 


2600.00 


2600.00 


2600.00 


5200.00 


21.00 


21.00 


42.00 


15.00 


15.00 


30.00 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


106.68 


106.68 


213.36 


205.44 


205.44 


410.88 


274.68 


274.68 


549.36 


30.00 


30.00 


60.00 


15.00 


— 


15.00 


660.00 


660.00 


1320.00 


— 


15.00 


15.00 






* Hospitalization Insurance — University's program or equivalent insurance coverage required of 
all dental students in addition to the Student Health Fee. 



Dental Hygiene Program 





Fall 


Spring 


Total 


Matriculation (New Students) 


$ 15.00 


$ — 


$ 15.00 


Tuition (Fixed Charges) 








In-State 


352.50 


352.50 


705.00 


Out-of-State 


1275.00 


1275.00 


2550.00 


Instructional Resources Fee 


16.00 


16.00 


32.00 


Student Activities Fee 


15.00 


15.00 


30.00 


Student Health Fee 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


Hospitalization Insurance* 








One Person 


106.68 


106.68 


213.36 


Two Persons 


205.44 


205.44 


410.88 


Family 


274.68 


274.68 


549.36 


Supporting Facilities Fee 


30.00 


30.00 


60.00 


Student Liability Insurance 


10.50 


— 


10.50 


Dormitory Fee (Double Occupancy) 


660.00 


660.00 


1320.00 


Graduation Fee (Seniors) 


— 


15.00 


15.00 



^Hospitalization Insurance — University's program or equivalent insurance coverage required of all 
full-time dental hygiene students in addition to the Student Health Fee. 



Postgraduate Program 





Fall 


Spring 


Total 


Matriculation (New Students) 


$ 15.00 


$ _ 


$ 15.00 


Tuition (Fixed Charges) 








In-State 


1051.50 


1051.50 


2103.00 


Out-of-State 


1989.50 


1989.50 


3979.00 


Instructional Resources Fee 


16.00 


16.00 


32.00 


Student Activities Fee 


15.00 


15.00 


30.00 


Student Health Fee 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


Hospitalization Insurance (Optional) 








One Person 


106.68 


106.68 


213.36 


Two Persons 


205.44 


205.44 


410.88 


Family 


274.68 


274.68 


549.36 


Supporting Facilities Fee 


30.00 


30.00 


60.00 


Dormitory Fee (Double Occupancy) 


660.00 


660.00 


1320.00 



Graduate Program 





Fall 


Spring 


Total 


Matriculation (New Students) 


$ 15.00 


$ — 


$ 15.00 


Tuition (Fixed Charges) Per Credit Hour 








In-State 


55.00 


55.00 


— 


Out-of-State 


100.00 


100.00 


— 


Instructional Resources Fee 


16.00 


16.00 


32.00 


Student Activities Fee 


14.00 


14.00 


28.00 


Student Health Fee 


8.00 


8.00 


16.00 


Hospitalization Insurance (Optional) 








One Person 


106.68 


106.68 


213.36 


Two Persons 


205.44 


205.44 


410.88 


Family 


274.68 


274.68 


549.36 


Continuous Registration Fee 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


Supporting Facilities Fee 


12.00 


12.00 


24.00 


Graduation Fee (Master's Degree) 






15.00 


(Doctoral Degree) 






60.00 


Dormitory Fee (Double Occupancy) 


660.00 


660.00 


1320.00 



Explanation of Fees 

The Application and/or Matriculation Fee partially defrays the cost of processing ap- 
plications for admission and enrollment data in the professional schools. These are not refund- 
able. The Application Fee will be applied against the Matriculation Fee for accepted students. 

The Continuous Registration Fee is applicable to students who have been advanced 
to candidacy and who have completed the thesis or dissertation. 

The Instructional Resources Fee is charged to provide supplies, materials, equipment 
and to defray other costs directly associated with the instructional program. 

The Student Activities Fee is used to meet the costs for various student activities, stu- 
dent publications and cultural programs. In each of the schools that has a Student Activities 
Fee, the Student Government Association, in cooperation with the dean's office of the 
school, recommends expenditure of the fee collected. 

The Student Health Fee is charged to help defray the cost of providing a Student 
Health Service. This service includes routine examinations and emergency care. Accept- 
able medical insurance is required in addition to the Student Health Fee. 

Health Insurance is required of all full-time students. A brief outline of the Student 
Health Insurance Program is furnished each student. Students with equivalent insurance 
coverage must provide proof of such coverage to the dean at the time of registration and 
obtain a Health Insurance Waiver. 

The Supporting Facilities Fee is used for expansion of various campus facilities that 
are not funded or are funded only in part from other sources. 

Student Liability Fee (malpractice) is charged all professional school students. 

The Graduation Fee is charged to help defray costs involved with graduation and com- 
mencement. 

Fees for Auditors are the same as those charged for courses taken for credit at both the under- 
graduate and graduate level. Audited credit hours will be added to a student's total credit en- 
rollment to determine whether or not a student is full-time or part-time for tuition and fee as- 
sessment purposes. 

Special students are assessed tuition and fees in accordance with the schedule for the com- 
parable undergraduate, graduate or first professional classification. 

• A service charge is assessed for dishonored checks and is payable for each check which 
is returned unpaid by the drawee bank on initial presentation because of insufficient 
funds, payment stopped, postdating, drawn against uncollected items, etc. 

For checks up to $50.00 $ 5.00 

For checks from $50.01 to $100.00 $10.00 

For checks over $100.00 $20.00 

• A Late Registration Fee is charged to defray the cost of the special handling involved for 
those who do not complete their registration on the prescribed days. 

• No degree will be conferred, nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript of record issued 
to a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his account. 

• The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other charges as may 
be necessary. 



Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 

Students desiring to leave the School at any time during the academic year are required to 
file with the Dean a letter of resignation. In addition, an Application for Withdrawal Form 
bearing the proper signatures must be filed with the Office of the Registrar. The student 

10 




must satisfy the authorities that he has no outstanding obligations to the School and return 
his student identification card. 

If the above procedures are not completed, the student will not be entitled to honorable dis- 
missal and will forfeit the right to any refunds to which he would otherwise be entitled. 
The date used in computing refunds is the date the application for withdrawal is signed by 
the Dean. 

Refunds. Students officially withdrawing from the School will be credited for all aca- 
demic fees charged to them less the Matriculation Fee, in accordance with the following 
schedule from the date instruction begins: 



Period from Date Instruction Begins 

Two weeks or less 
Between two and three weeks 
Between three and four weeks 
Between four and five weeks 
Over five weeks 



Refundable 

80% 
60% 
40% 
20% 




Official University Records 

Transcript of Record. Students and alumni may secure transcripts of their UMAB rec- 
ord from the Registrar's Office. There is a transcript charge of $2.00 per copy. Checks 
should be made payable to the University of Maryland. There is no charge for issuance of 
transcripts between University of Maryland campuses. A request for transcripts must be 
made in writing and should be made at least two (2) weeks in advance of the date when the 
records are actually needed. Transcripts are issued in turn as requests are received. 

No transcript will be furnished any student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the 
University have not been satisfied. 

11 



Disclosure of Student Information. In accordance with "The Family Education Rights 
and Privacy Acts of 1974" (PL 93-380). popularly referred to as the "Buckley Amendment," 
disclosure of student information, including financial and academic, is restricted. Release to 
anyone other than the student requires a written waiver from the student. A full policy state- 
ment may be found in the current UMAB campus information guide issued to all incoming 
students. 

Diploma Application 

Degree requirements vary according to the UMAB school program in which a student is regis- 
tered. However, each degree candidate must file a formal application for diploma with the Of- 
fice of the Registrar at the beginning of the term in which the student expects to graduate. 
This must be done by the end of the third week of the semester or the second week of the 
summer session. 

A student who does not graduate on the originally expected date must reapply for gradua- 
tion by the appropriate deadline. 

Student Health Requirements 

All students are required to have Blue Cross hospitalization insurance or its equivalent. A 
special Blue Cross/Blue Shield student policy is available to all students enrolling in the 
School. Detailed information regarding the provisions of the student policy may be ob- 
tained from the Student Health Office. At the time of registration each student must either 
purchase the student Blue Cross/Blue Shield coverage or produce certified proof of equiva- 
lent coverage. 

Upon arrival on campus, students are required to have a tuberculin skin test and chest x-ray 
as part of the registration process. Students with a negative tuberculin skin test will be re- 
tested each year upon returning to school. Students who convert from negative to positive 
skin tests are examined; an x-ray of the chest will be obtained at intervals and suppressive 
medication may be recommended. 

In addition to a tuberculin skin test and chest x-ray, each student is required to undergo a 
physical examination, including a urinalysis, at the Health Service Office. 

Each new student is also required by the Dental School to undergo an oral diagnosis exami- 
nation. The final acceptance of any student is contingent upon the correction of any defects 
noted during this examination within the first academic year. 

Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects corrected before enter- 
ing the Dental School in order to prevent loss of time which later correction might involve. 

The Dental School does not accept responsibility for an illness or accident occurring away 
from the community, or for expenses incurred for hospitalization or medical services not 
authorized by the Student Health Service. 

Student Professional Insurance 

It is the policy of the Dental School that all dental and dental hygiene students be required 
to carry professional liability insurance as a condition for enrollment in any academic pro- 
gram. This policy applies to all first, second, third and fourth year undergraduate dental 
students, third and fourth year dental hygiene students, and all Advanced Specialty Educa- 
tion students. Undergraduate students, both dental and dental hygiene, will obtain insur- 
ance coverage through a group program for a reasonable premium. This plan, payable at 
enrollment each year, can also provide equipment coverage for an additional nominal pre- 
mium. Information regarding professional coverage for undergraduate students is available 
through the Dental School's Office of Student Affairs or the Associate Dean for Clinical 
Affairs. 



12 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 




13 



Dental Students 

State Grants. In an attempt to meet the ever increasing needs of students, the Maryland 
legislature each year allocates to the University funds earmarked for student assistance. As 
a result, state grants are available to disadvantaged students who demonstrate a financial 
need. Awards are made on an individual basis after careful review of the student's current 
financial situation. 

Health Professions Student Loans. Under the Federal Health Professions Program, 
loans are made available to qualified students. Loans are reviewed on an annual basis and 
vary in amount depending on the student's financial need. Students are not assessed interest 
premiums until they graduate and begin repayment. Repayment begins one year after grad- 
uation and must be completed within ten years from that time. The current interest rate is 7 
percent per annum. 

Bank Loans. Through the Maryland Higher Education Loan Corporation and the United 
Student Aid Fund, loan programs which permit students to borrow money from their home 
town banks have been established. Graduate and professional students may borrow up to 
$5,000 per year to assist in meeting their educational expenses. Borrowers begin repayment 
ten months after graduation or withdrawal from school. At the present time, simple interest 
is charged at the rate of 7 percent. Further details may be secured from the UMAB Office 
of Student Aid. 

The Edward S. Gaylord Educational Endowment Fund. Under a provision of the 
will of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord of New Haven, Connecticut, an amount approxi- 
mating $16,000, the proceeds of which are to be devoted to aiding worthy students in se- 
curing a dental education, was bequeathed to the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland at Baltimore. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation. During World War II the Foundation recognized the 
burden that the accelerated course imposed upon many dental students who, under normal cir- 
cumstances, would earn money for their education by employment during the summer vaca- 
tion. The Foundation granted to this School a fund to provide rotating loans to deserving den- 
tal students. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund. This fund was established in 1954 by the New Jersey 
Alumni Association in memory of Dr. Albert A. Harrington, a member of the Class of 1910. 
The fund is a source of valuable help in aiding students to solve temporary financial problems. 

The Student Dental Association - Alumni Fund. This fund, created in 1960. was es- 
tablished for the purpose of aiding any student who may be in need of an emergency loan. 

The Russell Gigliotti Memorial Student Loan Fund. This fund is intended to pro- 
vide financial assistance primarily but not exclusively to students in the preclinical years, 
for which costs are significantly higher because of required instrument and material pur- 
chases. Any undergraduate dental student who qualifies for financial aid, and who is un- 
able to secure other University financial assistance, is eligible to apply. 
A maximum of $500 annually will be loaned to one student; no student may receive more 
than two loans during the period of training. Simple interest at the rate of 5 percent per an- 
num will be charged, commencing three months after graduation. Principal plus interest 
must be repaid within twenty-seven months following graduation. 

Health Education Assistance Loan. Dental students who are U.S. citizens and are en- 
rolled full-time in the dental program may borrow up to $10,000 per year to a cumulative 
maximum of $50,000. 

The loans are made by commercial lenders. Students may not borrow from another guaran- 
teed student loan program (such as the Maryland Higher Education loan) during the same 
academic year to be covered by the Health Education Assistance Loan. 

There is no federal interest subsidy under this program. Interest may not exceed 12 percent 
per annum (ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE) of unpaid balance of the loan. Interest may be 

14 



paid on an ongoing basis or accrued until repayment begins. If interest is accrued, it will be 
compounded semi-annually and added to the loan principal when repayment begins. An insur- 
ance premium, not to exceed 2 percent per annum, will be charged at the time an individual 
loan is processed. 

The International College of Dentists Student Loan Fund. In 1962 the Interna- 
tional College of Dentists established a fund to assist deserving senior students in need of fi- 
nancial aid. 

Gillette Hayden Memorial Foundation Student Loan Program. This loan is avail- 
able to promising women students in their junior, senior or graduate years of dental school. At 
this time the amount of each loan is not to exceed $1,000, repayable one year and one month 
after the date of graduation at a per annum interest of 1 percent. There is no formal applica- 
tion form; requirements are a transcript of the applicant's academic record, a letter of recom- 
mendation from the Dean, a character reference from a reputable person in the applicant's 
home town, and the name and address of the nearest relative. All inquiries should be ad- 
dressed to the Gillette Hayden Memorial Foundation, Suite 204, 33 Ponce de Leon Avenue. 
N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30308. 

Dental Hygiene Students 

Financial aid, in the form of scholarships, grants and loans, is awarded to students based 
upon apparent academic ability and financial need. Recipients of financial aid are expected 
to make satisfactory progress toward attainment of a degree and to abide by all academic 
and non-academic regulations of the University. In the case of new students, applicants 
must have been accepted for admission to the University before the financial aid applica- 
tion can be reviewed. 

Requests for information about and applications for financial aid for predental hygiene stu- 
dents should be addressed to the Student Aid Office at the campus to which the student is ad- 
mitted. Dental hygiene students (junior and senior standing) should write to the Student Aid 
Office, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Because each campus has its own filing deadline, applicants should contact the Financial 
Aid Office on the appropriate campus early in the spring semester to obtain a financial aid 
application and learn the filing deadline. Financial aid is awarded for only one academic 
year; a new application must be filed to apply for aid in a succeeding year. 

State Grants. Dental hygiene students are eligible for state grants which are described on 
page 14. 

General State Tuition Scholarships. The General Assembly of Maryland provides a 
number of limited tuition scholarships to students entering college for the first time. The 




15 



scholarships may be used in any approved institution of higher education within the State. 
At the University of Maryland, they cover the items listed as fixed charges. Awards are 
made by the State Scholarship Board based upon financial need and the results of a com- 
petitive examination, usually given during the month of November. For additional informa- 
tion and applications, contact high school guidance counselors or the Maryland State Scholar- 
ship Board. 2100 Guilford Avenue. Baltimore, Maryland 21218. 

General Assembly Grants. These grants are awarded by members of the legislature to 
persons living in the legislative district represented by the delegate or senator. 

American Dental Hygienists' Association Scholarship and Loan Program. 

The American Dental Hygienists' Association administers two scholarship programs: the 
Certificate Scholarship Program for students entering the final year of a dental hygiene cur- 
riculum and the Post Dental Hygiene Scholarship Program for certificate dental hygienists 
who will be enrolled in a program leading to a baccalaureate degree. Dental hygiene stu- 
dents who will be enrolled or accepted for full-time enrollment may also be considered for 
American Dental Hygienists' Association Loans which range from $500 to $1,000 annu- 
ally. Repayment begins ten months after graduation with 7.5 percent interest on the amount 
of the loan outstanding. For further information about these scholarships, write directly to 
the American Dental Hygienists' Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 
60611. 

In addition, local chapters of the ADHA may offer scholarships and/or loans. For informa- 
tion, contact the J ADHA advisor on the dental hygiene faculty. 

National Direct Student Loans. The University receives an annual National Direct Stu- 
dent Loan appropriation from the federal government that is used as part of the School's loan 
fund. National Direct Student Loan allocations are based on the same considerations as other 
financial aid awards. Repayment of a NDSL begins one year after the borrower ceases to be a 
full-time student. The loan is repaid at a minimum rate of $45 per quarter; repayment must be 
completed within ten years. No interest is charged on the loan until the student graduates. Af- 
ter that date, interest accrues at the rate of 3 percent per annum. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants. Under provisions established by the 
federal government, limited grants are available to encourage students of exceptional financial 
need to continue their postsecondary school education. A recipient must be a United States 
citizen enrolled as a full-time undergraduate. Applications are available at most undergraduate 
financial aid offices. 

Bank Loans. Most states have established federal guaranteed programs which permit stu- 
dents to borrow money from a home town bank. In most states undergraduates in good 
standing may borrow up to $2,500 per year to assist in meeting their educational expenses. 
Borrowers begin repayment ten months after graduation or withdrawal from school. At the 
present time, simple interest is charged at the rate of 7 percent. Further details concerning 
the Maryland program or programs in other states may be secured from the Student Finan- 
cial Aid Office or a local bank. 

Maryland Dental Hygienists' Association Loans. The Maryland Dental Hygienists' 
Association administers a loan program for qualified and needy senior dental hygiene stu- 
dents. Information is distributed to junior students by the Department of Dental Hygiene 
during the spring semester. 

The Patricia C. Stearns Scholarship. The Department of Dental Hygiene awards the 
Patricia C. Stearns Scholarship to a student entering the senior year who has demonstrated 
academic excellence; willingness to serve the class, school, and community; dedication to 
the profession; and high standards of professional conduct. 

Work-Study Program. The University has funds available for students who demonstrate a 
need for financial aid and are able to participate in a work-study program. Students may work 
a maximum of 20 hours per week in various departments on the UMAB campus, and typi- 
cally earn $1000 to $1200 per year. 

16 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 




17 



Requirements for Admission to the Dental Program 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland at Balti- 
more subscribes to a policy of equal educational opportunity for men and women of all 
races, creeds and ethnic origins. The Dental School, in seeking to broaden the racial and 
ethnic balance of its enrollment, encourages minority student applications. It is the objec- 
tive of the Dental School to enroll students with diversified backgrounds in order to make 
the educational experience more meaningful for each individual as well as to provide dental 
health practitioners to all segments of the community. 

Applicants for admission to the dental program must have successfully completed at least 
three academic years in an accredited college of arts and sciences. The college course must in- 
clude at least a year's credit in english (6). in biology (8), in physics (8), in general or inor- 
ganic chemistry (8), and in organic chemistry (8). All required science courses shall include 
both classroom and laboratory instruction. In addition to the 90 semester hours of credit re- 
quired (exclusive of physical education and military science), other courses in the humanities 
and the biological and social sciences are desirable. No more than 60 of the minimum re- 
quired credits will be accepted from a junior college; these credits must have been validated 
by an accredited college of arts and sciences. By the ruling of the Faculty Council, all admis- 
sion requirements must be completed by June 30 prior to the desired date of admission. 

All applicants must also present favorable recommendations from their respective predental 
committee or, if no such committee is available, from one instructor each in the Depart- 
ments of Biology and Chemistry. In all other respects, applicants must give every promise 
of becoming successful students and dentists of high standing. Applicants will not be ad- 
mitted with unabsolved conditions or unabsolved failures. 

Maryland residents should have science and cumulative grade point average (GPA) values 
of 2.6 or higher to be competitive for admission; nonresidents should have GPA values of 
3.3 or higher to meet the preferred requirements for admission. All applicants are encour- 
aged to take the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) in April of the year prior to admission but 
must take the DAT for the first time by no Later than October of the year prior to admis- 
sion. 

A pamphlet describing the test and an application to take the test will be sent to the applicant 
upon request made to the Office of Recruitment and Admissions of the Dental School. The 
pamphlet lists the dates of the tests (given in April and October) and the location of testing 
centers throughout the United States, its possessions and Canada. Residents of Maryland 
should have scores of 4 or higher in the Academic Average. Two-Dimensional Perceptual 
Ability Test (2D-PAT) and the Three-Dimensional Perceptual Ability Test (3D-PAT) sections 
in order to be competitive; nonresidents should have scores of 5 or higher in these sections to 
meet the preferred requirements for admission. Information on the regulations for the determi- 
nation of resident status may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Registrations, 
Room 132, Howard Hall, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore. Maryland 21201. 

Application and Acceptance Procedures 

Students are admitted only at the beginning of the fall semester in August. All applications 
are processed through the American Association of Dental Schools Application Service 
(AADSAS). An AADSAS application request card will be sent to the applicant after May 1 
of the year prior to the desired date of admission upon request made to the Office of Re- 
cruitment and Admissions of the Dental School. The AADSAS application must be filed 
by all applicants prior to December 1; early filing of the application is strongly recom- 
mended. AADSAS will duplicate the transcript, calculate the grade point average of each 
applicant, and furnish pertinent information to the Office of Recruitment and Admissions 
of the Dental School. 

If the requirements for admission are fulfilled, the applicant will receive the Dental School's 
application form, which should be completed and mailed with the application fee to the Of- 

18 



fice of Recruitment and Admissions of the Dental School. If receipt of the application and 
application fee is not acknowledged within ten days, the applicant should contact the Office 
of Recruitment and Admissions. All applicants who are seriously being considered will be 
interviewed; a personal interview does not, however, guarantee admission. The Subcom- 
mittee on Dental Student Admissions, composed of members of the faculty, students and 
alumni, selects qualified applicants for admission based on the applicant's grade point aver- 
age, DAT scores, personal recommendations and the personal interview. A deposit of $200 
must accompany an applicant's acceptance of an offer of admission. The deposit is intended to 
ensure registration in the class, is credited toward the applicant's tuition, and is not refund- 
able. 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

It is the policy of the Faculty Council of the Dental School that neither graduates of foreign 
dental schools nor students transferring from dental schools outside the continental United 
States be considered for admission with advanced standing. Graduates of foreign dental 
schools may take an examination given by the Maryland State Board of Dental Examiners 
in order to qualify for a license to practice in the State of Maryland. Those who do not pass 
the examination can make application, according to established policies and procedures, to 
be considered for admission to the Dental School as a regular first year student. Any stu- 
dent accepted for admission may be exempted from certain courses by passing the placing- 
out examination. 

Students currently attending a dental school in the continental United States may apply for 
admission with advanced standing, but must be in good standing in scholarship and charac- 
ter to be considered for admission. 

An applicant for transfer from another dental school must: 

• meet fully the requirements for admission described above 

• be eligible for advancement to the next higher class in the school from which the appli- 
cant seeks to transfer 

• have an overall average of C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) in all previous dental school courses 
excluding basic dental science or its equivalent, in which the applicant must have a 
grade of C or higher 

• present a letter of honorable withdrawal and recommendation from the dean of the 
school from which the applicant is transferring 

All applicants who meet these requirements will be sent the Dental School's application 
forms and will be scheduled for an interview. The academic record of each applicant ap- 
plying for admission by transfer from the dental school currently attending will be referred 
to the appropriate departmental chairman of the Dental School for review and recommen- 
dation concerning acceptance. The admission of a student by transfer is, in every case, 
contingent upon the availability of space in the class to which the student is seeking admis- 
sion. Credit hours, as listed in the prior academic record of the transferring student, will be 
prorated to conform with the cumulative credit hours of students in that class, in order to 
establish a comparable cumulative grade point average and class rank for purposes of Uni- 
versity and Dental School honors, letters of recommendation, etc. 

UMES ■ UMAB Honors Program 

In Fall 1979, the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES), in cooperation with the 
professional schools of the University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB), instituted the 
Honors Program in an effort to prepare students for professional school study while provid- 
ing them with a sound liberal arts education at the same time. The Honors Program con- 
sists of honors sections in chemistry, biology, mathematics, English and social science. It 
also emphasizes independent study, seminars and colloquia through which students are ex- 
pected to explore in depth the various disciplines. Specific preprofessional tracks in allied 

19 



health, dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work and community plan- 
ning are available. Upon successful completion of all requirements of the Honors Program, 
which include the professional school admission requirements, the Honors Program gradu- 
ate will be admitted into the corresponding professional school on the UMAB campus dur- 
ing the year immediately following graduation from UMES. 

Admission into the Honors Program is determined by the Honors Program Committee 
which is composed of representatives from UMES and each professional school for 
UMAB. A combination of predictive factors such as SAT scores, an interview(s), a per- 
sonal statement written at the time of the interview, and letters of recommendation will be 
used to determine the eligibility of a student for admission into the Honors Program. The 
cumulative academic performance of an applicant, as indicated by the high school record, 
will be assessed. Students anticipating possible entrance into the Program should have con- 
centrated and excelled in an academically enriched curriculum beginning as early as the 
freshman year in high school. For additional information, write to the Honors Committee, 
University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 21853. 

Optional Combined Arts and Sciences/Dental Program 

The University of Maryland at College Park and University of Maryland Baltimore County 
offer a combined arts and sciences dental curriculum leading to the degrees of Bachelor of 
Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery. The preprofessional part of this curriculum may be 
taken in residence in the College of Arts and Sciences on either campus, and the profes- 
sional part in the Dental School in Baltimore. Students who have been approved for the 
combined program and who have completed the arts and sciences phase may, upon the rec- 
ommendation of the Dean of the Dental School, be granted the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence by the College of Arts and Sciences at the first summer commencement following the 
completion of the student's first year in the Dental School. A student may enter the arts and 
sciences dental program at College Park or UMBC with advanced standing from an accred- 
ited college or university; however, the last year of the preprofessional training must be 
completed at College Park or UMBC and the professional training must be completed in 
the Dental School. Further information and applications may be obtained from the Office 
of Admissions at the respective undergraduate college. 

Academic Policies 

In the evaluation of student performance, the following letter grades are used: 



A- 


excellent 


E- 


conditional 


B - 


good 


F- 


failure 


C- 


satisfactory 


I- 


incomplete 


D- 


below average 







A failure must be absolved by repeating the entire course, in which case the original F 
grade remains on the student's permanent record, but only the new grade is used to com- 
pute the grade point average. 

A student whose performance at the end of a course is not satisfactory in one or more seg- 
ments or in some clinical procedures may receive the E grade. The E grade, which remains 
on the student record, is used only as a temporary final grade. This grade implies that the 
student should achieve a satisfactory level of proficiency within a short time without having 
to repeat the entire course. Following successful remediation, the student will receive the 
final grade earned in the course. An unresolved grade of E will result in a permanent grade 
ofF. 

A student whose work in completed assignments is of acceptable quality but who, because 
of circumstances beyond his control (such as illness or disability), has been unable to com- 
plete course requirements will receive a grade of Incomplete. When all requirements have 
been satisfied, the student will receive the final grade earned in the course. Except under 
extraordinary circumstances, an Incomplete may not be carried into the next academic year. 

20 



In the clinical sciences, performance at the D level is unacceptable; thus the D grade is not 
used by the clinical departments or Basic Dental Science. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the basis of credits assigned to each course and the fol- 
lowing numerical values for grades: A-4, B-3, C-2, D-l, F-O. The grade point average is the 
sum of the products of course credits and grade values, divided by the total number of course 
credits in that year of the curriculum. 

Students must achieve a 2.0 grade point average in order to advance unconditionally to the 
next year. Probationary advancement may be permitted for students in the following cate- 
gories: 

1) First year students who obtain a grade point average of 1.70-1.99 

2) Second year students who obtain a grade point average of 1.70-1.99 in second year 
courses 

3) Third year students who obtain a grade point average of 1 .85-1.99 in third year courses 

A student placed on probationary status must achieve a minimum 2.0 average in courses 
taken during the probationary academic calendar year. Failure to do so will result in dis- 
missal from the dental program subject to discretionary review by the Faculty Council. 

A student may be permitted to absolve deficiencies during the summer session, as recom- 
mended by the appropriate Advancement Committee and approved by the Faculty Council. 
Depending on the type of deficiencies involved, students may be required to register and 
pay a fee for the summer session. 

The performance of each student is reviewed at the end of the first semester and at the end 
of the academic year by an Advancement Committee. At the end of the first semester, the 
Committee determines, on the basis of progress and/or final grades, whether the student is 
progressing satisfactorily; if warranted, remediation, assignment to a special program (first 
or second year students only), or dismissal may be recommended to the Faculty Council. 

Students assigned to a special program are placed under the supervision of the Special Aca- 
demic Programs Committee, which tailors a program to the needs and abilities of each stu- 
dent and determines advancement or dismissal on the basis of progress and/or final grades 
at the end of each semester. All first and second year courses must have been completed 
satisfactorily before the student may be advanced into the regular third year curriculum. 

At the end of the academic year, the appropriate Advancement Committee recommends for 
each student either unconditional advancement, probationary advancement, repeat of the 
year, or academic dismissal to the Faculty Council, which must approve all Advancement 
Committee decisions. 



Specially Tailored Educational Program 

The Specially Tailored Educational Program (STEP) functions within the framework of the 
regular curriculum but allows students to spend up to three years completing first and sec- 
ond year courses. The program was developed for students who, because of academic diffi- 
culty, illness or other circumstances, need special assistance and/or additional time to fulfill 
the academic requirements. 

The First and Second Year Advancement Committees may offer a student the option of STEP 
or assign to STEP any student whose progress is unsatisfactory, if it is generally agreed that a 
reduced load and/or special tutorial assistance may improve the student's chance of success- 
fully completing course requirements. 

Students assigned to STEP are placed under the supervision of the Special Academic Pro- 
grams Committee, which plans for each student a program suited to his particular needs 
and carefully monitors his progress. Departmental counselors in the basic sciences and pre- 
clinical sciences are available to assist any student assigned to STEP. 

21 




Students may be advanced into the regular program when they have demonstrated satisfac- 
tory progress; otherwise they remain in STEP until they have completed all first and second 
year courses. Once the student is advanced into the regular program, his academic progress 
is evaluated by the appropriate Advancement Committee. 

The Minimester 

In the 1977-78 academic year the Dental School initiated a January minimester. Didactic 
courses offered to all students in the minimester are elective. Third and fourth year students 
may participate only in those courses scheduled before 10:00 a.m., since the clinic con- 
tinues to operate on the usual schedule during the minimester. 

Information concerning course offerings will be distributed to all students by the Office of 
Academic Affairs. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon a candidate who has met the 
conditions specified below: 

1) A candidate must have satisfied all requirements of the various departments. 

2) A candidate must have achieved a minimum 2.0 average in fourth year courses. 

3) The candidate must have paid all indebtedness to the University prior to graduation. 



Early Graduation 

The University of Maryland Dental School's early graduation program enables talented, 
conscientious students who have completed all requirements to be recommended by the 
faculty for graduation in January of the fourth year. 

This is not a special educational program. Students who qualify must have had educational 
experiences comparable to those of students who will graduate in June and must have 
achieved at least the same degree of clinical proficiency. 

22 



Dress Code 

Clinic jackets must be worn during all clinical dentistry and basic dental science laboratory 
procedures. Coats must be purchased prior to the first day of the academic year; incoming 
students may arrange a group purchase of coats during the first week. Clinic jackets must 
conform to the following specifications: 

• hip length, white, short sleeves 

• conventional collar and lapel 

• three buttonholes, white buttons 

• three pockets: top left, bottom left, bottom right 

To permit cleaning, students will need three coats in the first year, five coats in the second 
year, and seven coats in the third and fourth years. 

Students are required to maintain a high level of personal hygiene and appearance, particu- 
larly in the dental clinics. Hair must be neatly combed; if the hair is shoulder length or 
longer, it must be tied up. Men are required to wear dress pants, shirt and tie under the 
clinic jacket; women, conventional attire or pants-suit uniform. Jeans, tennis shoes, sandals 
without hosiery, or other inappropriate casual attire may not be worn by either men or 
women. These guidelines apply to all areas of the School, whether a patient is present or 
not. Exceptions in non-patient care areas must be in writing from the discipline supervisor. 



Student Expenses 

The budget guide below is provided as a reasonable approximation of average expenditures 
by students enrolled during 1980-81. Estimates are for students living away from home; 
single students who live in University facilities will pay approximately $800 in housing 
fees for the 1980-81 academic year. 

To these expenses must be added the costs of instruments, supplies and books. 



Approximate Average Expenditures 1980-81 







Single 


Mar 


ried 




9 month 


1 1 month* 


9 month 


1 1 month 


Tuition 










Resident 


$2600 


$2600 


$2600 


$2600 


Non-Resident 


5200 


5200 


5200 


5200 


Fees and Health Insurance 


392 


392 


500 


500 


Food 


900 


1100 


1170 


1430 


Lodging (includes utilities) 


1530 


1870 


2610 


3190 


Personal (clothing, 










laundry, incidentals) 


540 


660 


720 


880 


Travel 


1170 


1430 


1170 


1430 



*Third Year and APT students. 

Instruments and Supplies. Every student is required to provide his own instruments, 
except those for oral surgery. A complete list of essential instruments and materials for all 
courses is compiled by the Special Committee on Instruments and Equipment. Each student 
must pay for the instruments and materials upon delivery. 

The costs of required instruments for the 1980-81 session are listed below to provide a gen- 
eral indication of the expenditures involved. 



First Year 


$2525.00 


APT Program 


Second Year 


$1326.00 


First Year $2737.00 


Third Year 


$ 590.00 


Second Year $ 115.00 



23 



Textbooks. The purchase of textbooks is not required. A list of textbooks recommended for 
first year courses is mailed to incoming students during the summer prior to enrollment. Text- 
book lists for second, third and fourth year courses are circulated at the beginning of the aca- 
demic year. The campus bookstore stocks these books; students may purchase books there or 
at other local bookstores. Approximate costs of textbooks and other instructional materials are 
as follows: 

First Year $300 

Second Year 200 

Third Year 75 

Fourth Year 25 

Student Judicial Policy 

Professional Code Of Conduct. Dentistry is an exacting profession, demanding the 
highest personal behavior from its practitioners. As health professionals, dentists and dental 
hygienists enjoy a high degree of public confidence and trust. They govern their own affairs to 
a great extent and have earned this privilege by successfully assuming the responsibility for 
their own conduct. In our society the health practitioner functions on the basis of self- 
discipline rather than imposed regulation. Acceptance of this Code of Conduct represents the 
student's desire to fully prepare him/herself for the obligations of the dental profession. 

As traditionally expected of all health professionals, the student will demonstrate the highest 
standards of integrity at all times. As specific examples: 

• written and practical examinations must be accomplished in accordance with the specific in- 
structions. 

• all procedures shall be accomplished according to departmental guidelines, i.e., radio- 
graphs. 

• any work submitted for evaluation (laboratory or clinical) must represent a student's own 
effort when required. 

• students shall not duplicate, intentionally or not, any faculty member's signature for any 
reason. 

• there will be demonstrated, under all circumstances, a keen respect for the rightful owner- 
ship of equipment, instruments, facilities, books, supplies, and personal belongings. 

Any irregularities concerning professional conduct occurring inside or outside of the Dental 
School may be reported to a chairperson of the Judicial Board (a standing committee of the 
Faculty Council), who may refer the matter to the Judicial Board or other appropriate persons. 

A copy of the Student Judicial Policy is distributed to all students upon matriculation. 



Employment Opportunities in Dentistry 

The public demand for more and better oral health care will continue to create a climate for 
growth in the dental profession. 

Current dental graduates can anticipate initial annual net income on the average of $20,000 
per annum. This income is contingent upon and can be affected by the area he serves, the 
practice specialty, and the state of the economy at the time. 



24 



The Dental Curriculum 



Subject 



Year I 

Clock Hours 



Credits 



Semesters 

1 2 



Total 



Anatomy 255 

DANA 511 

Basic Dental Science 180 

DENT 511 

Biochemistry 90 

DBIC511 

Conjoint Sciences 

DOS 512 

Microbiology 

DMIC 512 

Oral Health Care Delivery 15 

OHCD511 

Physiology 

DPHS 512 





255 


13 


85 


365 


14 




90 


5 


45 


45 


3 


90 


90 


5 


38 


53 


3 


90 


90 


5 



540 



448 



988 



48 



Subject 



Year II 

Clock Hours 



Credits 



Semesters 

I 2 



Total 



Basic Dental Science 270 

DENT 521 

Biomedicine 90 

DPAT521 

Conjoint Sciences 90 

DCJS 521 

Oral Health Care Delivery 15 

OHCD521 

Pharmacology 90 

DPHR521 

555 



88 


558 


25 


05 


195 


12 


90 


180 


12 


32 


47 


3 




90 


5 



515 



1070 



57 



25 



Subject 



Year III 

Clock Hours 



Credits 



Semesters 
1 2 



Total 



Conjoint Sciences 30 

DCJS 531 

Oral Diagnosis/Radiology 30 

DPAT531 

Oral Health Care Delivery 15 

OHCD531 

or 

OHCD 537 Special Studies 

(elective) 

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 

DSUR531 

Orthodontics 

ORTH531 

Pediatric Dentistry 

PEDS 531 

Periodontics 

PERI 531 

Fixed Restorative Dentistry 

FIXD 531 

Removable Prosthodontics 

REMV 531 

Endodontics 

ENDO 531 

Clinic 

Minimester clinic hours 



30 



30 



30 



60 


4 


60 


7 


45 


6 



15 




30 


45 


5 


15 




15 


30 


2 


15 




15 


30 


8 


15 




15 


30 


11 


15 




15 


30 


13 


30 




15 


45 


8 


15 

436 


78 


477 


15 

913 

78 


4 


631 


78 


672 


1381 


68 



Subject 






Year IV 

Clock Hours 




Credits 








Semesters 

1 2 


Total 




Conjoint Sciences 






149 


90 


105 
345 


254* 

771 
90 


6 

58 


DCJS 541 

Clinic 

Minimester clinic hours. . 






426 










'■'over half of these hours are 
26 


elec 


five 


575 


90 


450 


1115 


64 




COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Anatomy 

Chairman: 

Professors: 

Associate Professors: 

Associate Clinical Professor: 

Assistant Professor: 

Assistant Clinical Professor: 

Lecturer: 



Dr. D. Vincent Provenza 

Barry, Piavis, Provenza 

Gartner, Hiatt, Meszler, Seibel 

Scherlis 

Khan 

Mader 

Lindenberg 



The basic course in human anatomy consists of a thorough study of the cells, tissues, organs 
and organ systems of the body from the gross, microscopic and developmental aspects. Princi- 
ples of body structure and function are studied with particular emphasis on those concerned 
with the head, facial region, oral cavity and associated organs. Neuroanatomy deals with the 
gross and microscopic structure of the central nervous system and peripheral nerves with spe- 
cial attention to functional phases. Correlation is made with other courses in the basic science 
and clinical disciplines of the dental curriculum. 

DANA 511. Human Anatomy (13) 

For Postdoctoral Students: 

DANA 514. The Anatomy of the Head and Neck (3) 



For Graduate 
DANA 610. 
DANA 611. 
DANA 612. 
DANA 614. 
DANA 615. 
DANA 616. 
DANA 617. 
DANA 618. 
DANA 619. 
DANA 620. 
DANA 621. 
DANA 622. 
DANA 633. 
DANA 799. 
DANA 899. 



Students: 

Human Embryology (4) 

Human Gross Anatomy (8) 

Human Neuroanatomy (4) 

Advanced Head and Neck Anatomy (3) 

Embryological Basis of Anatomy (4) 

Experimental Embryology (4) 

Radiation Biology (4) 

Special Problems in the Anatomies (1-3) 

Seminar (1) 

Physical Methods in the Anatomies (4) 

Human Histology (6) 

Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology (2) 

The Anatomy of the Temporomandibular Joint (1) 

Master's Thesis Research (credit by arrangement) 

Dissertation Research (credit by arrangement) 



27 



Basic Dental Science 

Director: Dr. George F. Buchness 

Clinical Professor: Halpert 

Associate Professors: Buchness, Moffitt 

Assistant Professor: Thompson 

Instructor: Hostetter 

Staff: All clinical departments 

Basic Dental Science is the administrative unit directly responsible for teaching the fundamen- 
tal principles, techniques and manual skills related to the practice of dentistry during the first 
and second years of the curriculum. Areas of instruction include dental morphology and oc- 
clusion, preventive dentistry, periodontics, dental materials, operative dentistry, fixed partial 
prosthodontics, removable complete and partial prosthodontics, endodontics, pediatric dentis- 
try, orthodontics, oral surgery, oral diagnosis and radiology. The instructional format includes 
the use of lecture, laboratory projects, self-instructional media, assigned reading, clinical as- 
signments, and both written and practical examinations. Course planning and presentation are 
coordinated by the Director and involve the cooperative effort of members of every clinical 
department. 

DENT 511. Basic Dental Science I (14) 
DENT 521. Basic Dental Science II (25) 

Biochemistry 

Chairman: Dr. John P. Lambooy 

Professors: Chang, Lambooy, Leonard 

Associate Professors: Bashirelahi, Thut 

Assistant Professor: Courtade 

Associate Staff: Charles 

Biochemistry is a study of life's processes in terms of molecular structure of food substances 
and body constituents. The Department has two teaching goals: to present a course in compre- 
hensive biochemistry to the first year students seeking a professional degree in dentistry, and 
to provide a program of specialized training for graduate students seeking an advanced gradu- 
ate degree (M.S., Ph.D.) in preparation for a career in teaching and/or research. 

The course provided for students studying for the Doctor of Dental Surgery degree covers the 
major traditional subjects of biochemistry. Dental students who have previously taken a course 
in biochemistry may take a placing-out examination which, if passed satisfactorily, permits 
them to be excused from taking this course. The Department also participates in the Conjoint 
Sciences courses and the Accelerated Professional Training Program of the dental curriculum. 

DBIC 511. Principles of Biochemistry (5) 

For Postdoctoral Students: 

DBIC 512. Dental Biochemistry (2) 

For Graduate Students: 

DBIC 609. Seminar (1) 

DBIC 611. General Biochemistry for Graduate Students (4) 

DBIC 612. Biochemical Endocrinology (3) 

DBIC 613. Biochemistry of Lipids (2) 

DBIC 614. Biochemistry of Vitamins (2) 

DBIC 615. Nutrition and Energy Metabolism (2) 

DBIC 616. Biochemistry of Carbohydrates (2) 

DBIC 708. Special Topics in Biochemistry (1-3) 

DBIC 709. Non-thesis Research in Biochemistry (1-3) 

DBIC 799. Thesis Research (Master's; credit by arrangement) 

DBIC 899. Dissertation Research (Doctoral; credit by arrangement) 

28 



Clerkship Program 

Two elective clerkship programs allow selected fourth year students to pursue further studies 
in departmental activities specially designed to meet their needs and interests. Students devote 
a portion of their clinic time to these specialized programs; the remaining clinic time is spent 
in the comprehensive treatment of patients in the regular program. Clerkships are available in 
both basic science and clinical disciplines. 

DCJS 546. Clerkship II (elective) (10) 
DCJS 547. Clerkship I (elective) (19) 

Clinical Dentistry 

Staff: All clinical departments 

The clinical education program is designed to provide each student with a broad background 
of clinical experience based on the philosophy of prevention and comprehensive patient care. 
Although the need for the treatment of existing disease is of paramount importance, the clini- 
cal program stresses those aspects of complete dental care which are founded on preventing 
the occurrence or recurrence of disease. Each second, third and fourth year dental student is 
assigned his own treatment cubicle where each provides patient care in a manner similar to the 
general practitioner in the community. Clinical areas for undergraduate instruction are desig- 
nated as general practice clinics and team teaching is accomplished using general dentists and 
specialists providing interdepartmental instruction for the student and the highest level of den- 
tal care for the patient. The clinical program functions each month of the year in order to pro- 
vide continuity of patient care. 

Conjoint Sciences 

Director: Dr. Harold L. Crossley 
Staff: All departments 

The program in conjoint sciences is structured to bring together all biological and clinical sci- 
ences in an effort to impress upon the student the importance of sound knowledge in all 
phases of the art and science of dentistry. Problems of clinical significance form the basis of 
subject material for the program. Every department, where appropriate, contributes its exper- 
tise to the understanding and solution of the problem. Courses in the conjoint sciences focus 
on broad areas of instruction, with the first and second years more heavily oriented toward the 
basic sciences and the third and fourth years more directly related to general and special clini- 
cal problems. 

In the first year important features of human growth and development are emphasized, espe- 
cially the clinical implications of normal and abnormal oro-facial development. The second 
year program traces the development of caries and periodontal disease, concentrating on diag- 
nosis, treatment and prevention. In the third year the management of oral conditions associ- 
ated with a broad spectrum of patient types is considered, with special emphasis on drugs and 
their clinical application. The curriculum in Conjoint Sciences IV includes a required unit on 
practice administration and a wide range of elective course offerings. 

A special unit on cardiopulmonary resuscitation is incorporated into this program, as well as 
comprehensive instruction in the control of apprehension and pain. In addition, didactic in- 
struction concerning the treatment of special patients is synthesized into the conjoint sciences 
program. 

DCJS 512. Conjoint Sciences I (3) 
DCJS 521. Conjoint Sciences II (12) 
DCJS 531. Conjoint Sciences III (4) 
DCJS 541. Conjoint Sciences IV (6) 



29 



Dental Care for the Handicapped 

Clinical Director, Special Patient Program: Dr. Arthur L. Hayden 

This program provides dental students with the fundamentals for delivering dental care to 
handicapped children and adults. The didactic portion spans three years of the curriculum and 
includes information on the nature of handicapping conditions and their effects on the patient. 
Emphasis is on the clinical dental management of patients with handicapping disorders. The 
didactic phase utilizes independent learning resources, augmented by scheduled faculty in- 
struction. During the third and fourth years, students provide care for handicapped patients in 
the Special Patient Clinic, a facility specifically designed and operated for this purpose. Stu- 
dents also obtain introductory experience in hospital dentistry. The program emphasizes the 
special needs of the handicapped that must be considered in order for diagnostic, preventive 
and corrective dental services to be provided. 

Educational and Instructional Resources 



Chairman: 


Dr. James F. Craig 


Professor: 


Moreland 


Associate Professor: 


Craig 


Assistant Professor: 


Romberg 


Instructor: 


Bateman 


Clinical Instructor: 


Linthicum 


Associate Staff: 


Land 



The Department of Educational and Instructional Resources has as its primary objective the 
implementation of a comprehensive instructional development program embracing all areas of 
the dental curriculum. Such a program applies the principles of management to the process of 
education and is designed to maintain a constant focus on the quality of the education being 
provided students pursuing a career in dentistry or dental hygiene. Facilities include a closed- 
circuit color television system and graphic and photographic support area for the development 
of media in a variety of formats. The Department's staff is readily available for assistance to 
the faculty in the design and development of independent learning materials for the dental cur- 
riculum, or for consultation regarding media applications in a variety of educational settings. 

The Department also maintains an Independent Learning Center (ILC) which houses 86 study 
carrels and 3 group study areas specifically for the use of self-instructional media by students. 
The ILC is available for utilization from morning through early evening hours on weekdays 
and Saturdays, and provides a spacious and comfortable atmosphere for independent study. 

Additionally, the Department endeavors to provide the dental practitioner the opportunity to 
continue his education by making available a variety of instructional materials in an indepen- 
dent learning format. 

Endodontics 

Chairman: Dr. James L. Gutmann 

Clinical Professor: Norris 

Associate Professor: Gutmann 

Associate Clinical Professors: Andrews, August, Schunick 

Assistant Professors: Hovland, Warren 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Krzeminski, Levinson, Mattocks, Quarantillo 

Clinical Instructors: Dumsha, Heaton, Lucas, Siegel, Trager 

The student's introduction to endodontics begins in the second year as part of Basic Dental 
Science II. It consists of a series of lectures and laboratories which stress the fundamentals of 
root canal therapy. Upon successful completion of this course the student is ready to perform 
the same procedures on clinical patients who warrant this treatment. 

In the third year lectures are presented which stress diagnosis and the integration of the biolog- 
ical aspects of endodontics into the clinical setting. Cases are treated clinically with the stu- 
dent demonstrating an acceptable level of mastery by the completion of his third year. 

30 



The fourth year experience in endodontics is primarily clinical. A mastery of clinical endodon- 
tics on more complex cases is expected of each student. 

ENDO 531. Principles of Clinical Endodontics (4) 
ENDO 541. Endodontic Clinic (4) 

Extramural Training Program 

Director: Dr. Mark L. Wagner 

The Extramural Training Program is designed to provide an educational experience for all den- 
tal students. After completion of the junior year, students are assigned to a dental treatment fa- 
cility for a four week period. These students are offered an opportunity to participate in patient 
care at dental treatment facilities under the supervision of a preceptor. 

This educational experience is designed to allow students to observe and participate in the op- 
eration of a dental practice or extramural clinical facility; to encourage practitioner-student in- 
terchange concerning concepts in dentistry; and to develop the student's insight into the role of 
the general practitioner, including his relationship with other health professionals, community 
health resources, and the community at large. 

Preceptors participating in the program are located in urban and rural communities of Mary- 
land and at United States Coast Guard Stations throughout the United States. It may be neces- 
sary that some of the additional costs for this assignment be borne by the student (i.e., travel, 
lodging, meals). 

Area Health Education Center Program. One of the University of Maryland at 
Baltimore's commitments toward improving health care and delivery programs in primary 
care is the Area Health Education Center (AHEC) program. 

The AHEC program has been developed to provide a comprehensive health care education 
program for dental students, as well as for students from the other four UMAB professional 
schools. There are three basic types of AHECs established: rural, urban and geriatric. The ru- 
ral AHEC is located in Western Maryland. Urban and geriatric AHECs are comprised of sev- 
eral local hospitals and clinics. 

Fixed Restorative Dentistry 

Chairman: Dr. Alvan M. Holston 

Professor: Greeley 

Clinical Professor: M. Graham 

Associate Professors: Carr, Diaz, Haroth. Mastrola 

Associate Clinical Professor: Finagin 

Assistant Professors: Bradbury, DiGianni, Gingell, Holston, Jeffrey, 

Nelson, Payne, Strassler, Tewes, Whitaker, G.H. 

Williams, Wood 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Abraham, Crooks, Iddings, Livaditis, VandenBosche 
Instructor: Zeller 

Clinical Instructors: Berman, Dietrich, Gordon, Kulick, Miller, Mullen 

Russell, Sanidad, Schubert, Sweeney 
Lecturer: Griswold 

Associate Staff: Britt, Suls 

The scope of instruction in fixed restorative dentistry involves the art and science of replacing 
missing teeth and lost or diseased tooth structure with fixed (non-removable) restorations; the 
disciplines of operative dentistry and fixed partial prosthodontics are included. The undergrad- 
uate teaching program is integrated throughout the four year curriculum. 

The Department of Fixed Restorative Dentistry is responsible for major segments of the 
courses in Basic Dental Science, in which students are introduced to fundamental principles 
and develop the manual skills necessary for clinical treatment of patients. The first year pro- 
gram includes methods and materials used to restore individual teeth, and an understanding of 

31 



the destructive process of dental caries and the preventive aspects of restorative treatment. 
Second year students are introduced to concepts and skills used in replacement of missing 
teeth with fixed partial prostheses. Instructional methodology includes lectures, television 
demonstrations, slide-tape instructional manual programs and laboratory exercises on simu- 
lated human dentition. During the first two years, limited but increasing clinical patient treat- 
ment with close staff supervision augments and reinforces the foundation provided. 

During the third and fourth years, didactic instruction and extensive clinical treatment with 
staff guidance facilitate the application and integration of fundamentals of operative dentistry 
and fixed partial prosthodontics. The Department also participates in the conjoint sciences pro- 
gram by providing a review of previously taught and advanced techniques through a didactic 
format. 

FIXD 531. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (13) 
FIXD 541. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (14) 



Microbiology 

Chairman: Dr. Donald E. Shay 

Professors: Krywolap, Shay 

Associate Professors: Delisle, Falkler, Nauman, Sydiskis 

Assistant Professor: Minah 

Special Lecturers: Hawley, Joseph, Libonati, Oryshkevych, Snyder 

The Department of Microbiology offers undergraduate and graduate programs. The under- 
graduate program is organized to supply the student with the fundamental principles of micro- 
biology in order that he may understand the chemical and biological mechanisms of the pro- 
duction of disease by bacteria and other parasites, and the means by which the host protects 
itself against bacteria and related organisms. The graduate programs leading toward the de- 
grees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy are designed to train students for posi- 
tions in research and teaching, particularly in dental schools. 

DMIC 512. Microbiology (5) 

For Advanced Undergraduates: 

DMIC 401. Pathogenic Microbiology (4) 

DMIC 451. Serology Immunology (3) 

DMIC 452. Virology (3) 

DMIC 453. Mycology (3) 

DMIC 454. Parasitology (3) 

For Graduate Students: 

DMIC 600, 601. Chemotherapy (1,1) 

DMIC 609. Special Problems in Microbiology (1-3) 

DMIC 611. Public Health (2) 

DMIC 612. Bacterial Fermentations (2) 

DMIC 621. Advanced Dental Microbiology and Immunology (4) 

DMIC 624. Microbiology of the Periodontium (2) 

DMIC 630. Experimental Virology (4) 

DMIC 634. Viral Oncology (2) 

DMIC 635. Bacterial Genetics (4) 

DMIC 650. Advanced General Microbiology (4) 

DMIC 651. Advanced General Microbiology - 2nd Semester (4) 

DMIC 653. Techniques in Microscopy (4) 

DMIC 689. Seminar (1) 

DMIC 710. Microbial Physiology (4) 

DMIC 799. Thesis Research (Master's; credit by arrangement) 

DMIC 899. Dissertation Research (Doctoral; credit by arrangement) 

32 



. 



Oral Diagnosis 

Chairman: Dr. C. Daniel Overholser 

Professor: Hasler 

Clinical Professor: Brotman 

Associate Professors: Aks, Overholser, Park 

Associate Clinical Professor: Bloom 

Assistant Professors: Balciunas, Charles, Kutcher, Meiller, Peterson 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Katz, Levin, McWilliams, Scheitler, Vandermer, 

Weiner 
Instructors: DePaola, Emerson, L. Williams 

Clinical Instructors: Bacharach, Barrett, Bederson, Brooks, Eisenberg, 

Horlick, Markoff, Sachs, Shulman, Silberman, 

Sullivan 
Special Lecturers: Applefeld, Beverly, Braun 

The curriculum in oral diagnosis includes the basic principles of the patient interview, the fun- 
damentals of physical examination, recognition of oral disease, and the management of pa- 
tients with oral and/or systemic disease. 

Principles of Biomedicine, an interdisciplinary course taught in conjunction with the Depart- 
ment of Oral Pathology, introduces the second year student to oral diagnosis through didactic 
presentations concerning the patient interview, clinical examination, oral radiology, and treat- 
ment planning. Clinical aspects of the course are introduced through Basic Dental Science. 

Principles of oral diagnosis are taught in the third and fourth years clinically and didactically. 
These courses reinforce the concept that the dentist should receive adequate training in obtain- 
ing medical histories, performing appropriate physical examinations, interpreting the results of 
various laboratory tests, and, most importantly, relating the physical status of the patient to the 
dental treatment plan. 

DPAT 521. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 

DPAT 531. Principles of Oral Diagnosis/Radiology (7) 

DPAT 541. Principles of Oral Diagnosis/Radiology (4) 

Oral Health Care Delivery 

Chairman: Dr. Thomas L. Snyder 

Associate Professors: Morganstein, Snyder 

Associate Clinical Professors: M Sachs. Shulman 

Assistant Professors: Andrews, Cohen, Dana, DeRenzis, Hayden. Long. 

Soble 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Dent, Maddox 
Instructors: R. Jeffrey, Peterson, G.C. Williams 

Clinical Instructors: Apatoff, Eisenberg. Eldridge. B. Graham, M. 

Greene, Hoffman, Lombardi. Rullman. J. Sachs, 

Silverman, Streckfus 
Special Lecturers: Abosch, Bloom. Bushel. Donnelly, Gillespie. 

Kleinman. Labelle. Rogers, Schweizer, Weinstein 

In its teaching, research and service activities the Department of Oral Health Care Delivery is 
committed to the development, evaluation and dissemination of methods for assessing and 
meeting the oral health needs of the population in ways that are efficient, effective and accept- 
able to both the providers and the recipients of care. 

The primary teaching areas are: (1) behavioral sciences, (2) dental practice management (3) 
dental delivery systems, (4) dental health education, (5) dental epidemiology and (6) sit-down 
four-handed dentistry and its applications. During the four year curriculum, the student partici- 
pates in lectures, seminars, small group experiences and a clinical program. Field experiences 
and special projects are interwoven into the curriculum to support the didactic presentations. 

33 



Specific topics of instruction include: a survey course in oral health care and an introduction to 
human behavior, dental practice management, and dental epidemiology in the first year; basic 
principles of sit-down four-handed dentistry, human factors in health care: behavior, business 
and prevention, dental health education and community planning in the second year; personnel 
management, communications, business systems, financing of dental care, dental delivery 
systems and sit-down four-handed dentistry clinic in the third year; dental management appli- 
cations and group practice simulation clinic in the fourth year. The curriculum in the Depart- 
ment of Oral Health Care Delivery utilizes a building block approach. Basic concepts and 
principles provided during the first two years are amplified and reinforced in the third and 
fourth years. The clinical program, in years three and four, correlates and demonstrates deliv- 
ery system principles and alternatives utilizing preventive dentistry, behavioral and modern 
dental practice management concepts. An instructional unit concerning the development of a 
dental practice, presented in Conjoint Sciences IV, is coordinated by faculty of the Department 
of Oral Health Care Delivery. 

OHCD 511. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 521. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 531. Oral Health Care Delivery (6) 
OHCD 541. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 



Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 

Chairman: Dr. McDonald K. Hamilton 

Professors: DeVore. Hamilton 

Clinical Professor: Cappuccio 

Associate Professors: Bergman. Richter 

Associate Clinical Professor: Tilghman 

Assistant Professors: Eisen. Smith 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Butler. Kogan 

Special Lecturers: Helrich, Kowalewski 

Introductory lectures in minor oral and maxillofacial surgery, preclinical laboratory in oral and 
maxillofacial surgery, and lectures and demonstrations in local anesthesia are given during the 
first and second semesters of the second year by departmental participation in Basic Dental 
Science II. Third year lectures involve all phases of oral and maxillofacial surgery and general 
anesthesia. Students are rotated to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic in block assign- 
ments during the second, third and fourth years for progressive participation in oral surgical 
procedures. Fourth year students are assigned to University Hospital in block assignments for 
operating room experience and general anesthesia experience; they also take night calls with 
the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery resident. The Department participates in three years of the 
Conjoint Sciences program. 

DSUR531. Oral Surgery (5) 
DSUR541. Oral Surgery (5) 

For Graduate Students: 

DSUR 601. Clinical Anesthesiology (6) 

DSUR 602. Advanced Anesthesiology (3) 

DSUR 605. Surgical Anatomy (3) 

DSUR 609. Special Problems In Oral Surgery (credit by arrangement) 

DSUR 620. General Dental Oral Surgery (4) 

DSUR 621. Advanced Oral Surgery (4) 

DSUR 631. Facial Growth and Development (2) 

DSUR 632. Facial Growth and Development (2) 

DSUR 799. Research (credit by arrangement) 



34 



Oral Pathology 

Chairman: Dr. Martin Lunin 

Professor: Lunin 

Associate Professors: Beckerman, Levy, Swancar 

Associate Clinical Professor: Mackler 

Assistant Professor: Arafat 

Instructor: Beelat 

The undergraduate teaching program consists of an interdisciplinary course that covers the ba- 
sic principles of pathology and medicine through presentation of the morphologic, chemical 
and physiologic changes of basic disease processes and important specific diseases. Emphasis 
is placed on the diagnosis, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of disease proc- 
esses in the oral cavity. The aim is to provide a sound basis for the differential diagnosis of 
oral lesions and a rationale for their treatment. The student is provided ample opportunity to 
develop proficiency in problem solving in oral diagnosis. A variety of techniques for examina- 
tion and diagnosis are covered, including dental radiography. 

Graduate and postgraduate programs are offered for students desiring specialty or research 
training. 

DPAT 521. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 

For Graduate Students: 

DPAT 612, 613. Special Problems in Oral Pathology (2,2) 

DPAT 614, 615. Histopathology Techniques (4,4) 

DPAT 616, 617. Advanced Histopathology of Oral Lesions (3,3) 

DPAT 618, 619. Seminar (1,1) 

DPAT 799. Research (Master's; credit by arrangement) 

DPAT 899. Research (Doctoral; credit by arrangement) 

Orthodontics 

Chairman: Dr. William M. Davidson 

Professor: Davidson 

Clinical Professors: Grewe. Niswander, Swinehart 

Associate Professor: Ceen 

Assistant Professors: Smith, Williams 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Bonebreak. Higginbottom, Long, Morris, Riger, 

Schoenbrodt. Scornavacca. Sweren 

Clinical Instructors: Hrechka. Rubier. Wank 

Special Lecturers: Christiansen, Frazier. Hamlet 

Associate Staff: Kreutzer 

The predoctoral program of instruction in orthodontics is directed toward providing the dental 
student with the knowledge and skills necessary to: 

1) recognize an established or developing malocclusion. 

2) institute preventive and therapeutic treatment plans within the scope of the general den- 
tal practice, 

3) consult as a team member with the specialist, 

4) refer cases requiring specialist care as appropriate, and 

5) coordinate comprehensive care of the patient. 

The program in orthodontics occurs during all four years. Didactic and laboratory exercises 
provide a strong foundation for delivery of limited orthodontic treatment as part of an adult 
and child patient's comprehensive dental care. Elective and clerkship opportunities are availa- 
ble for those who wish to pursue additional course work and clinical experience. 

ORTH. 531. Orthodontics (2) 
ORTH. 541. Orthodontics (2) 

35 




Pediatric Dentistry 

Chairman: 
Professor: 
Clinical Professor: 
Associate Professors: 
Associate Clinical Professors: 
Assistant Professors: 
Assistant Clinical Professors: 
Associate Staff: 



Dr. James T. Rule 

Rule 

Kihn 

Abrams, Owen, Shelton, Wagner 

Balis, Schulz 

Josell, Kula, Minah 

Biederman, Canion, Coll, Gravitz 

Truelove 



The student is introduced to the performance of dentistry for children by means of lectures and 
laboratory projects presented in Basic Dental Science and Conjoint Sciences. Didactic instruc- 
tion consists of a series of lectures. Particular attention is devoted to diagnosis and treatment 
planning, preventive dentistry procedures including fluoride therapy, nonpunitive patient man- 
agement techniques incorporating the use of psychopharmacologic agents, treatment of trau- 
matic injuries to the primary and young permanent dentition, restorative procedures in primary 
teeth, pulpal therapy, and interceptive orthodontics. In the latter area emphasis is focused upon 
diagnostic procedures and the treatment of incipient malocclusions in the primary and mixed 
dentitions. 

PEDS 531. Pediatric Dentistry (8) 
PEDS 541. Pediatric Dentistry (6) 



Periodontics 

Chairman: 
Professors: 
Clinical Professors: 
Associate Professors: 
Associate Clinical Professors: 
Assistant Professors: 
Assistant Clinical Professors: 

Clinical Instructors: 

Associate Staff: 



Dr. John J. Bergquist 

Bergquist, Bowers 

Halpert, Sobkov, Zupnik 

Allen, Moffitt, Page 

Lever, Livingston, Plessett, Winson 

Granet, Hayduk 

Chmar, Eskow, Feldman, H. Fisher, Gher, Golski, 

Sindler, Summerhays, Sydney, Vernino, Zeren 

Bradshaw, Chen, M. Fisher, Kam, Keiser, Lekas, 

Mandel, Shockett, Suzuki 

Organ 



Students are introduced to fundamental periodontics in lectures during the first and second 
years; clinical experience begins late in the second year. In the third year students have didac- 
tic exposure to advanced periodontal procedures. Third and fourth year students enter into a 
learning contract that delineates a set of basic minimum clinical experiences. Interested stu- 
dents have the opportunity to choose from a broad range of additional experiences and to con- 
tract for both additional experience and the grade the student feels these experiences warrant. 
Thus, the individual student has substantial involvement in establishing his educational goals. 

PERI 531. Periodontics (11) 
PERI 541. Periodontics (11) 



36 



Pharmacology 

Chairman: Dr. Richard L. Wynn 

Professor: Rudo 

Clinical Professor: Dolle 

Associate Professors: Thut, Wynn 

Assistant Professors: Arthur, Crossley 

The program of instruction in pharmacology is divided into three phases. The first phase in- 
cludes a thorough study of basic concepts and principles in pharmacology using mainly proto- 
type drugs. Emphasis is placed on the mechanism of action of drugs, their absorption, distri- 
bution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity and drug interactions. The second phase deals with 
clinical aspects of oral and nutritional therapeutics and control of pain and anxiety, presented 
in the Conjoint Sciences program. Special attention is given to clinically useful drugs, their in- 
dications and contraindications. The third phase, designed for graduate, continuing education 
and postdoctoral students, is an in-depth coverage of current topics in general pharmacology, 
biotransformation of drugs, molecular pharmacology, pharmacology of local and general anes- 
thetics, and dental toxicology. 

DPHR 521. General Pharmacology and Therapeutics (5) 

For Graduate Students: 

DPHR 606. General Pharmacology and Therapeutics (6) 

DPHR 616. Biotransformation of Drugs (3) 

DPHR 619. Dental Pharmacology Seminar (1) 

DPHR 626. Molecular Pharmacology (3) 

DPHR 636. Pharmacology of Anesthetic Drugs (3) 

DPHR 646. Pharmacology of Central Motor Control Systems (3) 

DPHR 656. Dental Toxicology and Therapeutics (2) 



Physiology 

Chairman: Dr. Leslie C. Costello 

Professors: Costello, Kidder 

Associate Professors: Franklin, Myslinski 

Associate Clinical Professor: Buxbaum 

Assistant Professor: Bennett 

Assistant Research Professor: Staling 

The Department of Physiology offers both undergraduate and graduate programs. The under- 
graduate course stresses the basic principles of physiology and provides the student with 
knowledge of the function of the principal organ systems of the body. Dentally-oriented as- 
pects of physiology are taught through departmental participation in the Conjoint Sciences 
program. The Department also presents courses for postgraduate students and offers graduate 
programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy for students 
interested in careers in teaching and research. 

DPHS 512. Principles of Physiology (5) 

For Postdoctoral Students: 

DPHS 551. Clinical Physiology (3) 

DPHS 568. Special Topics in Oral Physiology (1) 

For Graduate Students: 

DPHS 611. Principles of Mammalian Physiology (6) 

DPHS 618. Advanced Physiology (1) 

DPHS 628. Research (1-2) 

DPHS 799. Master's Thesis Research (credit by arrangement) 

DPHS 899. Doctoral Dissertation Research (credit by arrangement) 

37 



Removable Prosthodontics 

Chairman: Dr. Robert J. Leupold 

Professors: Jerbi, Leupold, Ramsey, Reese 

Associate Professors: Fetchero, Quarantillo, Wagley 

Associate Clinical Professors: DeSai, Mort 

Assistant Professor: Elias 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Grieco, Schwartz, Straube 

Instructor: Faraone 

Associate Staff: Baier, King 

Removable prosthodontics concerns the art and science involved in replacing lost dental and 
associated structures by means of removable artificial appliances. These appliances are de- 
signed and constructed to restore and maintain function, appearance, speech, comfort, health 
and the self-image of the patient. The program of instruction is divided into three phases con- 
sisting of departmental participation in Basic Dental Science II, didactic instruction in the ef- 
fective management of clinical prosthodontic procedures, and clinical treatment of dental pa- 
tients under the guidance of staff members. 

REMV 531. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 
REMV 541. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 



ACCELERATED PROFESSIONAL TRAINING PROGRAM (APT) 

APT is a special curriculum which satisfies the requirements for the D.D.S. degree in three 
calendar years. The program is a compression of a conventional curriculum but an innovative 
restructuring of subject matter to demonstrate the correlations among the basic science and 
clinical disciplines. The reduction of time is accomplished through careful selection of course 
content to ensure clinical relevancy and also through the use of self-instructional methods, 
combined with seminar discussions, to reinforce the learning process. APT students acquire 
clinical experience equal to students in the conventional program. 

Candidates for the program are chosen from those persons who have accepted an offer of en- 
rollment in the University of Maryland Dental School. Each person who receives an offer also 
receives descriptive information about APT and an invitation to be interviewed for the pro- 
gram. The objectives of the interview are to judge the candidate's maturity, self-image, moti- 
vation toward dentistry, personality, and ability to communicate. The pool of candidates usu- 
ally averages about forty, from which a class of ten is selected. The success of the program 
has been attributed to the small class size, the maturity and motivation of the students, and the 
efforts of a dedicated faculty. The success is also demonstrated by the achievements of the 
program's graduates in a variety of endeavors. 

Director: Dr. James R. Swancar 

Associate Professors: Haroth, Swancar 

Assistant Professor: Gingell 

Instructor: Zeller 

NOTE: APT receives instructional support from many other departments of the Dental School 
for both classroom and clinical teaching. 



38 



Course Descriptions 



Year I 

First year courses provide a background of basic sciences essential to dental practice, knowl- 
edge of the most prevalent dental and oral diseases, preclinical experience in basic forms of 
therapy, and an introduction to clinical practice. 

DAPT 500. Essentials of Human Biology (4) A general study of the cells, tissues, or- 
gans and organ systems of the body from the gross, microscopic and applied functional as- 
pects, as well as integrated material on basic human physiology and biochemistry. 

DAPT 501. Oral Health Care Delivery (2) In Semester I, there is an introduction to the 
past, current and future role of dentistry in health care delivery. The Semester II offering, Eco- 
dontics, addresses human development, communication, prevention, health education, epide- 
miology, practice organization and planning, and history of dentistry. 

DAPT 502. Radiology (3) The basics of the science of ionizing radiation, production of x- 
rays, and the various techniques of dental roentgenography including the processing, viewing 
and interpretation of films. 

DAPT 503. Mechanisms of Disease (3) Basic discussion of cellular pathology, inflam- 
mation and repair, principles of infectious diseases, immunology and hypersensitivity, and 
principles of neoplasia. 

DAPT 504. Stomatognathology (11) An interdisciplinary course incorporating the 
gross, microscopic and functional anatomy of the head, facial region, oral cavity and associ- 
ated organs (temporomandibular articulation). Also included are a study of the embryology of 
facial and dental organ systems as well as a study of dental occlusion and its associated labo- 
ratory exercise. 

DAPT 505. Removable Prosthodontics (8) A series of lectures covering the diagnosis, 
treatment planning and rationale for each procedure involved in the fabrication of a complete 
prosthodontic appliance. Clinical experience (DAPT 515), which allows the student to apply 
the knowledge of procedures acquired in lectures, is also provided. 

DAPT 506. Clinical Dental Science (3) Practical experience in various laboratory proce- 
dures and in the use of dental materials; associated with DAPT 505 and DAPT 512. 

DAPT 507. Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (2) The methods of history taking 
and patient examination; clinical and laboratory aids; and the principles to be followed in ar- 
riving at a diagnosis, prognosis and rational plan of treatment. 

DAPT 510. Dental Caries (3) The diagnosis, etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and 
prevention of dental caries with emphasis upon the correlation of basic science disciplines and 
their clinical significance in caries. 

DAPT 51 1 . Periodontics I (4) A study of gingival and periodontal disease including the 
clinical and histopathologic findings, etiologic factors and methods of prevention. The ration- 
ale for treatment is included with an introduction to treatment techniques. 

DAPT 512. Restorative Dentistry (8) The basics of intracoronal restorative procedures 
including diagnosis and treatment planning, and pulpal responses to these procedures. The stu- 
dent has an opportunity to perform these procedures in the laboratory; when competency in 
the laboratory has been demonstrated, the student is judged prepared to perform the same pro- 
cedures on patients. 

DAPT 513. Anesthesia and Pain Control (3) The neurophysiology and anatomy rela- 
tive to local anesthesia and pain control. The techniques of dental local anesthesia, the phar- 
macology of anesthesia agents, as well as the use of pre- and post-anesthetic agents are in- 
cluded. 

39 




DAPT 514. Physiologic Pathology (13) An interdisciplinary course in which the nor- 
mal and abnormal physiology and pathology of the various organ systems are studied in a cor- 
related manner to enhance the student's understanding of the effects of the disease process. 
Also included are medical considerations. 

DAPT 515. Clinical Dentistry (5) An introductory clinical experience for first year stu- 
dents consisting predominantly of complete denture construction. 



Year II 

In the second year, the student becomes increasingly involved in the clinical program, initially 
performing simple types of therapy on uncomplicated cases, while receiving didactic instruc- 
tion in more complex forms of treatment and in the dental specialties. By the close of the sec- 
ond year, each student is responsible for providing comprehensive care to a number of as- 
signed patients. 

Each course has a didactic and a clinical component, both of which must be mastered, al- 
though a single grade is given. 

DAPT 520. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (20) A comprehensive presentation of the the- 
ory and techniques of fixed prosthodontics. A laboratory project parallels the didactic course 
and must result in a passing grade before students are permitted to initiate similar procedures 
on their clinic patients. 

DAPT 521. Removable Prosthodontics (15) Presentation of the theory and practice 
of removable partial prosthodontics and continuation of the clinical application of remov- 
able prosthodontics. 

DAPT 522. Endodontics (8) This course is sequenced early in the second year to enable 
students to use endodontic techniques, as necessary, on their earliest assigned patients. There 
is a parallel laboratory project in which the student must demonstrate competence before start- 
ing an actual case. 

DAPT 523. Pediatric Dentistry (6) A study in depth of the procedures and techniques 
used in pediatric dentistry, with special emphasis on development of the dentition, preventive 
procedures, patient management, and management of the mixed dentition. Students are as- 
signed several patients, whose total care they provide during the two clinical years. 

DAPT 524. Orthodontics (4) A comprehensive study of this specialty, with particular em- 
phasis on the study of growth and development, diagnosis, and treatment of simple cases. 

40 



Clinical experience is gained through the assigned pediatric cases or adult patients for whom 
orthodontic therapy may be indicated. 

DAPT 525. Periodontics II (20) An extension of DAFT 511 including the techniques of 
periodontal therapy with emphasis on treatment techniques which are applicable in general 
dental practice. The course stresses clinical experience in periodontal therapy techniques. 

DAPT 527. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (7) An introductory course including surgi- 
cal principles, surgical instruments, multiple extractions, alveoloplasty, medical emergencies, 
and surgical orthodontics. The clinical component consists of assignment to the surgery clinics 
on a rotating basis, where students gradually acquire the requisite skills. 

DAPT 530. Diagnosis and Radiology (9) This is the only second year course without a 
classroom component. It consists of the application of the principles of diagnosis, treatment 
planning and radiology to assigned cases. The procedure must be mastered for each case. 

DAPT 531. Oral Health Care Delivery (4) APT students attend the lectures in OHCD 
531 in the conventional program. The course includes periodic assignment to the Solo Prac- 
tice Simulation Clinic for experience in four-handed dentistry. 



Year III 

The senior year is devoted to the achievement of competency in all disciplines. The student's 
background is broadened by the addition of courses in oral pathology (with emphasis on im- 
portant, though less frequently encountered, diseases of the mouth), clinical pharmacology, 
practice development, and a seminar series for the presentation of alternative and advanced 
methods of treatment. 

DAPT 540. Oral Pathology (8) A variety of diseases occurring in the dentist's field of in- 
terest is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on enabling the student to arrive at diagnoses 
by the collection of facts and the use of references. 

DAPT 541. Clinical Pharmacology (2) A short but comprehensive presentation of pro- 
totypic drugs useful in dentistry, including their mechanism of action, metabolism, excretion, 
indications and contraindications. 

DAPT 542. Oral Health Care Delivery (4) The didactic portion, entitled "Practice De- 
velopment," is offered within the Conjoint Sciences IV portion of the regular undergraduate 
program. The clinical portion includes periodic assignment to the Solo Practice Simulation 
Clinic, or alternatively, to the Group Practice Simulation Clinic on a voluntary basis for expe- 
rience in management of expanded function auxiliaries. 

DAPT 543. Senior Seminar (10) A series of seminar discussions by guest experts or reg- 
ular faculty on subjects of interest to senior students, such as advanced and alternative treat- 
ment methods. 

DAPT 550. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (1 0) An extension of the clinical experiences 
in DAPT 520. 

DAPT 551 . Removable Prosthodontics (6) An extension of the clinical experiences in 
DAPT 505 and 521. 

DAPT 552. Endodontics (4) A continuation of the clinical experiences in DAPT 522. 

DAPT 553. Pediatric Dentistry (5) A continuation of DAPT 523. 

DAPT 554. Orthodontics (3) A continuation of the clinical experiences in DAPT 524. 

DAPT 555. Periodontics III (12) The clinical continuation of DAPT 51 1 and 525. 

DAPT 556. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (5) The clinical continuation of DAPT 

527. 

DAPT 557. Diagnosis and Radiology (5) The clinical continuation of DAPT 530. 

41 



THE DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM 




42 



Faculty 

Chairman: Ms. Cheryl T. Metzger 

Assistant Professors: Metzger, Miller. -St**. Singer, Cxl/vJ, l^juAJU^ 

Instructors: Everett, Keene. Mulford. Parker. Rubinstein 

Clinical Instructor: Quinton i 

Academic Advisor: ftafcm JL Cot^ L W I " ^ ~' 7 n 73 J 

Note: Dental School faculty from other clinical and basic science departments provide lectures 

and instructional assistance in clinic and classroom. 



General Information 

The Dental School offers a baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene. This degree can be earned 
in one of two educational programs: the Preprofessional/Professional Program and the Postcer- 
tificate Program. The objective of both programs is to create an educational environment that 
will facilitate the students' development of knowledge, skills and attitudes that will enable 
them to assume positions of responsibility in a variety of health care and educational settings, 
such as: private dental offices; HMOs; hospitals; community, school and public health pro- 
grams; armed forces; United States Public Health Service; educational programs for members 
of the dental health care team; private and public institutions; and research centers. In addi- 
tion, these programs are designed to provide a foundation for graduate study in dental hygiene 
or related disciplines. 

The dental hygienist is an integral member of the health care team who strives to improve oral 
health by providing preventive and educational services to the public. Clinical dental hygiene 
services may include assessing patient's health status, examining hard and soft tissues of the 
oral cavity and head and neck region, removing deposits and stains from teeth, exposing and 
developing dental x-rays, applying fluorides and sealants, taking impressions for study 
models, and polishing amalgam restorations. 

Educational and management services for individuals and/or groups may include nutritional 
and oral hygiene counseling; educational programs for members of the dental health team: and 
community dental health program planning, implementation and evaluation. 

Employment Opportunities in Dental Hygiene 

Although the majority of dental hygienists are employed in private dental offices, there are op- 
portunities for those with baccalaureate and graduate degrees in dental hygiene education; 
community, school and public health programs: private and public institutions; commissioned 
service in the Armed Forces; research; and other special areas of practice. 

Current dental hygiene graduates, working full-time, can anticipate intital annual income in 
the range of $12,500 to $15,500, depending on the area, type of practice and general eco- 
nomic conditions. 



Program Description 

Preprofessional/Professional Program. This program consists of two main parts: a 
two year preprofessional curriculum at one of the three University of Maryland campuses 
(College Park, Baltimore County or Eastern Shore) or at another accredited college or univer- 
sity, and a two year professional curriculum at the Dental School. University of Maryland at 
Baltimore. A total of 125 semester credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Science de- 
gree in dental hygiene. 



43 



Two Year Preprofessional Curriculum. A suggested sequence for the preprofessional 
curriculum follows. These courses provide a foundation in basic sciences, social sciences and 
general education. It is recommended that students meet with the dental hygiene advisor each 
semester to ensure appropriate course scheduling. 



Freshman Year 



Preprofessional Curriculum 
Credits Sophomore Year 



Credits 



English Composition 
^Inorganic Chemistry 
^Organic Chemistry 
General Zoology 
General Psychology 
General Sociology 
Public Speaking 
**Humanities 



Total 



1st 


2nd 




1st 


2nd 


Sem. 


Sem. 




Sem. 


Sem 


3 




* Human Anatomy & 






4 




Physiology 


4 


4 




4 


^Microbiology 


4 




4 




Principles of 






3 




Nutrition 




3 




3 


***Social Science 


3 


3 




3 


**Humanities 




3 




6 


Statistics 


3 




— 


— 


Electives 




3 


14 


16 




— 


— 






Total 


14 


16 



*These courses must include a laboratory and meet the requirements for science majors. Survey- 
or terminal courses for nonscience majors are not acceptable for transfer. 

^Humanities: Courses must be selected from at least three of the following areas: literature, 
philosophy, history, fine arts, speech, math or language. 

*Social Sciences: General psychology and sociology are required; the remaining six credits 
should be selected from courses in psychology, sociology, government and politics, geography, 
geology or anthropology. 



Two Year Professional Curriculum. The professional curriculum includes clinical and 
didactic courses in the Dental School and studies in the student's selected area of concentra- 
tion. Throughout these two years, dental hygiene students work concurrently with dental stu- 
dents to provide patient care. 

During the first year, students expand upon their preprofessional basic science knowledge as it 
pertains to dental hygiene practice. In a clinical setting, the students begin to develop the 
skills, knowledge and judgment necessary to collect data for patient treatment; assess each 
patient's oral health status; and select and provide preventive and educational services, based 
on the individual needs of the patient. 

During the second year, students demonstrate increasing proficiency and self-direction in the 
assessment of patients' oral health status, the planning and provision of preventive services, 
and the identification of the need for consultation and referral. To enrich their educational ex- 
periences, students provide educational and/or clinical services in a variety of community set- 
tings, such as hospitals; schools; and facilities for the handicapped, chronically ill, and aged. 

Students select an area of concentration based on their interests and career goals. The options 
available include Education, Dental Public Health, Social Sciences, Human Development and 
Counseling, and Microbiology. The curricula in the Education and Dental Public Health areas 
of concentration, designed specifically for dental hygiene students, include the opportunity for 
career-oriented practical field experiences. 

44 







r iLM^fe 



S 





Preprofessional Curriculum 






Junior Year 




Credits 


Senior Year 


Credits 


DHYG311 

Prevention & Control 
of Oral Diseases I 




1st 
Sem. 

7 


2nd 
Sem. 


DHYG 411 

Advanced Clincal 
Practice I 


1st 
Sem. 

3 


2nd 
Sem. 


DHYG 312 
Oral Biology 




8 




DHYG 412 

Perspectives of Dental 
Hygiene Practice I 


3 




DHYG 313 
Oral Health Education 




2 




DHYG 413 

Community Service I 


1 




DHYG 321 
Prevention & Control 
of Oral Diseases 11 






6 


Area of Contentration 


9 


9 


DHYG 322 
Patients and the Community 




3 


DHYG 421 

Advanced Clinical 
Practice II 




3 


DHYG 323 
Principles of Dental 
Hygiene Practice 






2 


DHYG 422 

Prespectives in Dental 
Hygiene Practice II 




2 


DHYG 324 
Methods and Materials 
in Dentistry 






3 


DHYG 423 

Community Service II 




1 


DPHR 325 
General Pharmacology 
& Therapeutics 


al 




3 
17 


Total 






Tot 


17 


16 


15 



45 



Admission and Application Procedures 

High School Students. High school students who wish to enroll in the preprofessional 
curriculum should request applications directly from the Admissions Office of the University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742; The University of Maryland Baltimore County, 
5401 Wilkens Avenue, Catonsville, Maryland 21228; or the University of Maryland Eastern 
Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 21853. 

It is recommended that those preparing for a baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene pursue an 
academic program in high school which includes courses in biology, chemistry, algebra and 
social sciences. 

Preprofessional College Students. Students who have completed three semesters of 
the preprofessional curriculum should request an application at the end of the third semester 
from the Director of Admissions and Registrations. Room 132. Howard Hall, University of 
Maryland at Baltimore. 660 West Redwood Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201; or from 
the dental hygiene advisor. Applications for the Baltimore campus should be received no 
later than February 1 prior to the fall semester for which the student wishes to enroll. 

All applicants are required to submit Allied Health Professions Admissions Test (AHPAT) 
scores. Information concerning the AHPAT is available from the dental hygiene advisor on the 
College Park and Baltimore County campuses or from the Department of Dental Hygiene on 
the Baltimore campus. 

Applicants will be requested to appear for a personal interview. A minimum grade point aver- 
age of 2.3 in the preprofessional curriculum is recommended and preference will be given to 
those students who have maintained high scholastic averages. 

Enrollment at another University of Maryland Campus or completion of the preprofessional curric- 
ulum does not guarantee admission to the professional curriculum at the Dental School. Enroll- 
ment in the dental hygiene program is limited. 

Students who are offered admission will be required to send a deposit of $100 with a letter of 
intent to enroll. This deposit will be credited toward tuition at registration, but will not be re- 
funded in the event of failure to enroll. 




46 



Student Expenses 

To assist students with their financial planning, the following listing is provided as an ap- 
proximation of average expenditures by students enrolled during 1980-81. Students who will 
not be living at home or in University housing should allow additional funds for lodging. 
These estimates do not include food, travel and personal expenses. 

Approximate Average Expenditures 
1980-81 





Junior Year 


Senior Year 


Tuition 






In-State 


$ 705.00 


$ 705.00 


Out-of-State 


2,550.00 


2,550.00 


Dormitory, double occupancy 


1,320.00 


1,320.00 


Instruments/Supplies 


670.00 


75.00 


Uniforms and Shoes 


100.00 


30.00 


Textbooks 


400.00 


50.00 


Health Insurance (one person) 


213.36 


213.36 


Miscellaneous fees: 






Application, graduation, dues, 






instructional resources, supporting 






facilities, student health and 






malpractice 


150.00 


210.00 


Totals 






In-State 


$3,558.36 


$2,603.36 


Out-of-State 


$5,403.36 


$4,448.36 



Field experiences in both the junior and senior years may add additional costs for travel and/or 
meals at sites outside the Dental School. 



Graduation Requirements 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in dental hygiene must complete the preprofes- 
sional and the professional curricula as outlined. An average of C (2.0) in both the preprofes- 
sional and professional curricula is required for graduation. Students must complete a total of 
125 credits and will be awarded a Bachelor of Science degree by the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland at Baltimore. 

National and Regional Board Examinations 

Clinical and comprehensive written examinations are given in the spring of the senior year. 
Successful completion of these exams is necessary to obtain a license to practice dental hy- 
giene. 

Course Descriptions 

DHYG 311. Prevention and Control of Oral Disease I (7). The study of the morpho- 
logic characteristics and physiologic relationships of teeth and supporting structures; and the 
basic foundation for clinical dental hygiene practice are presented in class discussion and au- 
diovisual format. Laboratory and clinical experiences provide the opportunity for practical ap- 
plication of the principles and procedures for the identification, prevention and control of oral 
diseases. 



47 



DHYG 312. Oral Biology (8). The study of embryology and histology; anatomy and phys- 
iology; microbiology; pathology with emphasis on the head, neck and oral cavity; and the ba- 
sic principles of radiology and periodontology are presented in lecture, laboratory and audiovi- 
sual format. 

DHYG 313. Oral Health Education (2). The study of the elements of human behavior, 
principles of learning, methods of teaching and principles of communication as they relate to 
teaching oral health care to individuals and groups. Classroom discussions, small group activi- 
ties and clinical experiences provide the opportunity for application of these topics. 

DHYG 321 . Prevention and Control of Oral Diseases II (6). The study of principles 
and procedures for the prevention of oral disease including dental health education, oral hy- 
giene measures, dietary control of dental disease, use of fluorides, sealants and the oral pro- 
phylaxis; and continued study of the etiology and control of periodontal disease and oral pa- 
thology are provided through class discussion and audiovisual and clinical experiences. 
Students work closely with dental students to simulate the postgraduation team delivery of 
dental care. 

DHYG 322. Patients and the Community (3). The principles of community or dental 
public health, including social, economic and political factors affecting dentistry and the re- 
sponsibilities of dental professionals in the community are presented in lecture and seminar 
format. Students participate in a variety of community health activities with various population 
groups, such as physically and mentally handicapped, elderly persons and school children. 

DHYG 323. Principles of Dental Hygiene Practice (2). Seminars, group discussions 
and guest lecturers provide information relating to the history of dentistry and dental hygiene; 
the principles of ethics and jurisprudence; the philosophy, development of and current trends 
in dental auxiliary education and utilization; and professional development as it relates to pro- 
fessional associations, continuing education, evaluation of scientific literature and research 
contributions. 

DHYG 324. Methods and Materials in Dentistry (3). Introduction to the science of 
dental materials, including the composition and utilization of dental materials as they apply to 
clinical dental hygiene procedures, dental assisting and patient education are presented in lec- 
ture, class discussion and laboratory format. 

DPHR 325. General Pharmacology and Oral Therapeutics (3). The study of drugs 
and their use in the treatment, diagnosis and prevention of disease; the absorption, distribu- 
tion, metabolism, excretion and mechanism of action of drugs; and drug interactions, rationale 
for use, indications and contraindications are presented in lecture and class discussion format. 
Emphasis is placed on the relevance of this information to providing patient care. 

DHYG 411-421. Advanced Clinical Practice I and II (3-3). Clinical experiences in 
principles and procedures of dental hygiene practice are provided in simulated general dentis- 
try settings through concurrent patient treatment program with dental students. Students have 
the opportunity to experience and participate in alternative practice settings through block as- 
signments to dental specialty clinics within the school. 

DHYG 412-422. Perspectives of Dental Hygiene Practice I and II (3-2). These 
courses provide an overview of the dental specialties in relation to dental hygiene practice; 
principles of practice management; research design; instrument evaluation; and further study 
of basic sciences. Students utilize knowledge gained during first year experiences in the devel- 
opment of a periodontal case presentation. Students enhance written communication skills by 
preparing a manuscript and expand knowledge in an area of interest through completion of a 
senior project. 

DHYG 413-423. Community Service I and II (1-1). The externship program provides 
opportunity for senior students to select experiences beyond those given within the Dental 
School setting. The selection of the community site is based on student's interests and career 
goals. Sites include well-baby clinics, prenatal clinics, community health centers, nursing 
homes, senior citizen centers, facilities for the handicapped, hospitals, military clinics and 
schools, day care centers, public health department, and research centers. 

48 




Dental Public Health Area of Concentration 

The following courses are the core curriculum of the Dental Public Health area of concentra- 
tion. Enrollment in this area of concentration is optional and class size is limited. 

DHYG 415-425. Dental Public Health (3-3). Current issues surrounding the present 
health care delivery system and concepts of health care management are introduced in seminar 
format. Topic areas include financing, quality assurance, the role of the federal government, 
geriatric care, the role of the manager, functions in the managerial process, grantsmanship and 
accounting. 

DHYG 416-426. Dental Public Health Practicum (3-3). The student spends eight 
hours per week working in the community in such areas as program planning, implementation 
and evaluation. These courses must be taken concurrently with DHYG 415-425. 

Courses in the other areas of concentration and six credit hours of electives in the Dental Pub- 
lic Health curriculum are offered at the University of Maryland Baltimore County and/or Col- 
lege Park campuses. The dental hygiene advisor will provide curriculum requirements, course 
offerings and personal counseling related to selection of courses in an area of concentration. 
Students may wish to select their area of concentration during the second semester of the jun- 
ior year. 



The Postcertificate Program 

The postcertificate program provides the opportunity for registered dental hygienists who hold 
a certificate or associate degree to pursue studies leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Dental Hygiene. The curriculum is designed in two phases of full- or part-time study to meet 
each individual's unique academic, clinical and career interests. 

Phase I: General Requirements. General course requirements for the baccalaureate de- 
gree may be taken at any one of the three University of Maryland campuses (College Park, 
Baltimore County or Eastern Shore) or at another accredited college or university. The courses 
are listed in the Preprofessional Program, freshman and sophomore years, on page 

Phase II: Postcertificate Requirements. The Postcertificate Program at the Dental 
School consists of two core seminars totaling 8 credit hours; an Area of Concentration to- 
taling 18 credit hours (see page 44 for description); and 5 credit hours of academic elec- 
tives. 

49 



Curriculum Planning 

Registered dental hygienists who have completed a two year accredited dental hygiene pro- 
gram and want to earn a baccalaureate degree should contact the dental hygiene advisor at 
either the University of Maryland College Park, Room 2109 Turner Lab, College Park, Mary- 
land 20742, or the Dental Hygiene Office, Dental School, in Baltimore. The advisor will de- 
termine the number of transferable credits and the number of additional preprofessional 
courses necessary for application to the postcertificate program. If all preprofessional curricu- 
lum requirements have not been fulfilled, the student will be advised to apply for enrollment 
at one of the University of Maryland campuses or at another accredited college or university. 
If the preprofessional curriculum has been completed, the student will be advised to apply to 
the Postcertificate Program at the Dental School. 

Admission and Application Procedures 

In addition to meeting the general course requirements, the student applying for admission to 
the Postcertificate Program at the Dental School must: 

1) Be a graduate of a two year accredited dental hygiene program. 

2) Have completed a minimum of one year of clinical practice as a dental hygienist. 

3) Be licensed or eligible for licensure in the State of Maryland. 

Applications for admission may be obtained from the Director of Admissions and Registra- 
tions, Room 132, Howard Hall, University of Maryland at Baltimore, 660 W. Redwood 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 . Applications must be received no later than February 1 
prior to the fall semester for which the student wishes to enroll. The applicant will be asked 
to appear for a personal interview. 

Enrollment at another University of Maryland campus does not guarantee admission to the Post- 
certificate Program at the Dental School. Enrollment in the Postcertificate Program is limited. 

Students who are offered admission will be required to send a deposit of $100 with a letter of 
intent to enroll. This deposit will be credited toward tuition at registration, but will not be re- 
funded in the event of failure to enroll. 

Student Expenses 

Approximate average expenditures are listed on page 47. The amount given for instru- 
ments/supplies; uniforms and shoes; and textbooks are not applicable for postcertificate stu- 
dents. Costs in these categories would be considerably lower, with minimal expense for in- 
struments/supplies. 

Graduation Requirements 

One hundred twenty-five (125) semester credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Science 
degree in dental hygiene. The last 30 credit hours toward the baccalaureate degree must be 
taken at the University of Maryland. Courses not offered at the Dental School will be taken at 
another University of Maryland campus. 

Course Descriptions 

DHYG 410-420. Seminar In Dental Hygiene (4-4) (Postcertificate only). 

Reinforcement and updating of dental hygiene professional skills and education. Topic areas, 
which are explored through seminar, laboratory, extramural and practicum experience formats, 
include dental public health, clinical and classroom teaching, preventive dentistry, interper- 
sonal communication, research design, management and leadership. 

DHYG 418-428. Dental Hygiene Practicum (1-3/1-3)* Didactic and clinical education 
in a special area of dental hygiene clinical practice, teaching, community dental health, or re- 
search. 

* Elective variable credit course that requires approval of department chairman. 
50 



ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS 




51 



Graduate Education 

Graduate programs leading to the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 
degrees are offered by the Departments of Anatomy, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Oral Pathol- 
ogy and Physiology. A Master of Science degree is offered by the Department of Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery and is described under Advanced Specialty Education. 

Programs are also available for those who wish to pursue a graduate degree in one of the basic 
sciences concurrently with clinic specialty education. The combined degree/specialty training 
program generally requires three years for the Master's degree and five years for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. These programs are highly individualized and are developed according to 
the needs and wishes of the candidate. 

A Master of Science of Oral Biology program is available for graduate students who are en- 
rolled in the certificate programs in the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, 
University of Maryland at Baltimore. The program is a multidisciplinary one, in that the grad- 
uate courses necessary to satisfy the Graduate School's requirements for the Master's degree 
will be selected from the various departments of the University. Students will receive training 
under the supervision and direction of a member of the Graduate Faculty. Courses in educa- 
tion have been added to various tracks in order to equip the students to become more effective 
teachers of their respective specialities. 

The Baltimore campus Graduate School Bulletin and application for admission may be ob- 
tained from the Office of the Dean for Graduate and Interprofessional Studies and Research, 
University of Maryland at Baltimore, 624 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Advanced Specialty Education Programs 

Assistant Dean for Advanced Specialty Education: Dr. Wilbur O. Ramsey 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland at Baltimore 
offers programs of postdoctoral study in the following recognized dental specialties: endodon- 
tics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, oral pathology, orthodontics, pedodontics, periodontics 
and prosthodontics. Each program has been accorded full approval by the Commission on Ac- 
creditation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary Educational Programs of the Council on Dental Ed- 
ucation of the American Dental Association. 

The program in oral and maxillofacial surgery is of thirty-six months' duration; a Master of 
Science Degree is offered as an option. All other clinical programs, however, provide an op- 
portunity for those candidates who plan careers in teaching and research to matriculate in a 
combined Certificate/Degree program of thirty-six months' duration. All programs begin each 
year on July 1. Candidates successfully completing twenty-four-month programs are awarded a 
certificate by the Dental School, University of Maryland at Baltimore. Those candidates suc- 
cessfully completing thirty-six-month programs are awarded a certificate by the Dental School 
and the degree, Master of Science in Oral Biology, by the Graduate School, University of 
Maryland at Baltimore. 

Applicants for all programs must have aD.D.S. orD.M.D. degree or its equivalent and must 
give evidence of high scholastic achievement. A brochure describing all specialty programs 
may be obtained from the Assistant Dean for Advanced Specialty Education. 

Applications for the program in oral and maxillofacial surgery should be requested from the 
Chairman of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; applications for all other pro- 
grams from the Assistant Dean for Advanced Specialty Education. 

Facilities 

All programs except oral and maxillofacial surgery operate in a modemly equipped clinic of 
the Dental School in an area apart from the predoctoral clinic. The program in oral and maxil- 
lofacial surgery is situated in the University of Maryland Hospital, a large, metropolitan teach- 
ing hospital adjacent to the Dental School. 

52 




Each student is provided an individual operatory. Each program provides a conference room 
for its students, and each maintains appropriate laboratory and research facilities. Further re- 
search facilities and assistance are provided by the biological science departments of the Den- 
tal School. 

Affiliated Institutions 

In addition to campus resources (the Dental School, the Graduate School, the School of Medi- 
cine and the University of Maryland Hospital), Advanced Specialty Education programs main- 
tain active didactic and clinical affiliations with numerous regional institutions. Significant 
among these are the John F. Kennedy Institute (an affiliate of The Johns Hopkins University); 
the Maryland School for the Blind; Mercy Hospital; the National Naval Medical Center, Be- 
thesda, Maryland; Kernan Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland; the Office of the Medical Exam- 
iner, City of Baltimore; and the H. K. Cooper Institute, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Students in 
the oral and maxillofacial surgery program also serve a one-month's residency in the Seguro 
Social De Peru, Hospital Central #2, Lima, Peru, South America. 

Curriculum 

All postdoctoral programs conform to requirements and guidelines for advanced specialty 
education programs developed by the Commission on Accreditation (Council on Dental 
Education) of the American Dental Association. The curriculum of each program is struc- 
tured to meet accreditation guidelines and to meet special requirements of individual stu- 
dents. All programs, however, reflect a curriculum structure which integrates: 

• selected course work in advanced biological sciences under the aegis of the Graduate 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore; 

• extensive experience in specialized clinical procedures under direction of the program 
staff and in appropriate affiliated institutions; 

• a comprehensive background in the literature and state of the art of the clinical disci- 
pline; 

• selected course work in related clinical, social and behavioral disciplines; 

• a strong research component; 

• a teaching component of a didactic and applied nature. 

The educational experience is designed to prepare students for comprehensive practice in a 
specialized discipline, with integration of related disciplines; to prepare students for examina- 
tion by appropriate examining boards for specialty practice; and to provide a foundation for 
careers in research and teaching. 

Strong clinical specialty practices are integrated with appropriate didactic instruction as in- 
dicated in the following summaries of course work typical of certificate programs: 

53 



Endodontics 

DANA 61 4. Advanced Anatomy of Head and Neck 
DANA622. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology 
DANA 633. Anatomy of the Temporomandibular Joint 
DMIC 609. Special Problems in Microbiology 
DPAT 612/613. Special Problems in Oral Pathology 
DPHR656. Dental Toxicology 
DPHS612. Advanced Clinical Physiology 
END0568. Endodontic Seminars 
END0579. Special Problems in Endodontics 



Oral Pathology 

DANA621. Mammalian Histology and Embryology 

DPAT 612/613. Special Problems in Oral Pathology 

DPAT 614. Histopathology Techniques 

DPAT 616/617. Advanced Histopathology of Oral Lesions 

DPAT 618. Seminars - Oral Pathology ~ 

PATH 609. Surgical Pathology 



Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 

DANA 61 4. Advanced Anatomy of Head and Neck 

DMIC 609. Special Problems in Microbiology 

DPAT 612/613. Special Problems in Oral Pathology 

DPAT 616/617. Advanced Histopathology of Oral Lesions 

DPHS612. Advanced Clinical Physiology 

DSUR601. Clinical Anesthesiology 

DSUR605. Surgical Anatomy 

DSUR609. Special Problems in Oral Surgery 

DSUR 620/621. Advanced Oral Surgery 

DSUR 630/631. Cranio-Facial Growth and Development 

DSUR 799. Research 



Orthodontics 

DANA614. Advanced Anatomy of Head and Neck 
DANA633. Anatomy of the Temporomandibular Joint 
DMIC 609. Special Problems in Microbiology 
DPAT 612/613. Special Problems in Oral Pathology 
DSUR 631/632. Cranio-Facial Growth and Development 
ORTH568. Seminars in Orthodontics 
ORTH579. Special Problems in Orthodontics 

Orthognathic Surgery Seminars 
PREV 542. Introduction to Biostatistics 



Pedodontics 

DANA622. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology 

DANA633. Anatomy of the Temporomandibular Joint 

DMIC 609. Special Problems in Microbiology 

DPAT 612/613. Special Problems in Oral Pathology 

DSUR 631/632. Cranio-Facial Growth and Development 

PED0568. Seminars in Pedodontics 

PED0579. Special Problems in Pedodontics (Research) 

54 



Periodontics 

DANA 61 4. Advanced Anatomy of Head and Neck 

DANA 622. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology 

DANA 633. Anatomy of the Temporomandibular Joint 

DMIC 609. Special Problems in Microbiology 

DPAT 612/613. Special Problems in Oral Pathology 

DPAT 616/617. Advanced Histopathology of Oral Lesions 

DPHR656. Dental Toxicology 

PERI 568. Seminars in Periodontics 

PERI 579. Special Problems in Periodontics 



Prosthodontics 

DANA 61 4. Advanced Anatomy of Head and Neck 
DANA622. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology 
DANA 633. Anatomy of the Temporomandibular Joint 
DMIC 609. Special Problems in Microbiology 
DAPT 612/613. Special Problems in Oral Pathology 
DPHR656. Dental Toxicology 
DPHS612. Advanced Clinical Physiology 
PERI 568. Seminars in Periodontics/Prosthodontics 
PREV 542. Introduction to Biostatistics 
REMV568. Seminars in Prosthodontics 
REMV579. Special Problems in Prosthodontics 
Orthognathic Surgery Seminars 



Continuing Education Program 

Associate Dean for Continuing Education: Dr. Robert W. Haroth 

The Dental School conducts a formalized program of continuing education that provides struc- 
tured educational experiences beyond basic preparation for the profession. It includes educa- 
tional activities that update, refresh and reinforce the professional knowledge and skill of the 
practitioner. An average of sixty courses of one or more days' duration are made available 
during each academic year for dentists and dental auxiliaries. The clinical, biological, social 
and behavioral sciences related to practice are included in the course offerings. The courses 
are conducted by the School's faculty, visiting faculty and distinguished practitioners from all 
sections of the country. The courses are not intended as collegiate credit courses; however, a 
Continuing Education Unit (CEU) which equals 10 clock hours is the measurement used for 
the individual's records of attendance. 

Clinical and laboratory facilities and a spacious classroom specifically designed and equipped 
for the Continuing Education Program have been made available for courses held at the 
School. Off-campus courses are also provided for practitioners located in rural areas of the 
state. 

Over 50 percent of the on-campus courses are laboratory or clinical participating courses. The 
availability of faculty expertise and facilities of a university-based continuing education pro- 
gram offers several advantages to the practitioners. 

Students and faculty are invited and encouraged to attend continuing education courses at no 
cost on a space-available basis. 

55 



STUDENT LIFE 




mi a 



56 



Office of Student Affairs 

The Office of Student Affairs is either directly or indirectly involved with all aspects of stu- 
dent life and welfare at the Dental School. Primary areas of responsibility include academic, 
personal and career counseling; financial aid; and advisory services. 

Students who experience financial, health, legal, employment, housing and other personal 
problems are counseled by the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and referred, as necessary, 
to the appropriate campus agency or office. In addition, counseling concerning specialty train- 
ing, military service, internships, dental education and dental research careers is available to 
undergraduate dental students. 

The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs serves as advisor to all student organizations and pub- 
lications; he also assists in the coordination of joint student-faculty professional, social and 
cultural programs, for which the Student Affairs Committee of the Faculty Council has the 
major responsibility. 

The Office of Student Affairs maintains direct liaison with administrators as well as 
campus, community and professional organizations and agencies for the effective conduct 
of all student affairs. 

Office of Academic Affairs 

The Office of Academic Affairs is the source of student information concerning the academic 
program and the repository for records of student academic performance. The policy of the 
University of Maryland regarding access to and release of student data/information may be 
found in the current UMAB campus information guide issued to all incoming students. 

A major function of the Office is coordinating the academic counseling and guidance pro- 
grams of the School. Departmental academic counseling and progress reports are maintained 
and monitored. Records concerning counseling, referrals and disposition are maintained and 
serve as a resource to the faculty and administration for purposes of academic evaluation. 

Textbook lists, course schedules, examination schedules and the academic calendar are dis- 
seminated through this Office. Program information distributed to students includes handouts 
concerning the grading system, course credits, and guidelines for the selection of students for 
clerkship programs. This Office is also the student's source of lecture schedules, course out- 
lines, examinations, and grades for the interdisciplinary Conjoint Sciences program. 

Official class rosters and student personal data and address files are maintained by the Office 
of Academic Affairs, which serves as a liaison between the Dental School and the Director of 
Admissions and Registrations of the University for the coordination of registration procedures. 

The Office is also responsible for coordination of a computerized grading system which (a) 
provides each Advancement Committee with a composite report on all students in the class at 
the end of each semester; (b) generates an individual grade report at the end of the first semes- 
ter to advise the student of his progress; and (c) provides a final grade report for the academic 
year to both the student and the University's Office of Admissions and Registrations, which 
maintains the student's permanent record and issues the official transcript. 

The Office of Academic Affairs, which is under the direction of the Associate Dean for Aca- 
demic Affairs, provides assistance to both students and faculty in matters relating to the aca- 
demic program. 

Office of Clinical Affairs 

All intramural and extramural clinical programs of the Dental School are coordinated by the 
Office of Clinical Affairs. Major functions of this Office include scheduling faculty from the 
various disciplines to each clinic module; scheduling the rotation of students to special assign- 
ments; assigning patients to students; maintaining patient records; and maintaining the records 
of clinical performance of students. In addition, the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs and 
his staff provide assistance to students and patients who encounter difficulty. More than 

57 



120,000 patient visits are provided annually in the clinics of the Dental School. The person- 
nel, supplies, equipment and collection of fees associated with the operation of the teaching 
clinics are additional responsibilities coordinated through this Office. 

Housing 

Increased enrollment at the UMAB professional schools has placed a strain on the limited on- 
campus housing facilities. Only single, full-time students are eligible to reside on campus. Pri- 
ority is given to undergraduate professional students. Assignment to the residence halls is 
based on date of application, distance from home to the campus and availability of space. All 
assignments are made without regard for race, creed or national origin. Students are assigned 
spaces by random selection; requests for specific roommates WILL NOT be honored. The 
University reserves the right to make changes in room assignments deemed to be in the best 
interest of the students and/or the University. Resident accommodations, primarily double oc- 
cupancy, are available in the Baltimore Student Union and Parsons Hall Residence for 
Women. Board contracts are not available on the Baltimore campus; meals may be purchased 
in the Baltimore Union or University Hospital cafeterias. Additional information and applica- 
tion forms may be obtained from the Director of the Baltimore Union, 621 West Lombard 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

The majority of students live in residential areas of the city and the surrounding suburbs. 
Upon acceptance into a Dental School program, students may request apartment and housing 
listings from the Office of Student Affairs or from the Director of the Baltimore Union. 

Student Health Service 

The School provides medical care for its students through the Student Health Service, located 
in Room 145, first floor of Howard Hall, 685 West Baltimore Street. The office is staffed by a 
director, assistant director, three internists, two psychiatrists, a psychologist, a gynecologist 
and three registered nurses. 

Baltimore Union 

The Baltimore Union, a five-story building which contains a cafeteria, conference rooms, 
laundry facilities, game room and lounges, is located at 621 West Lombard Street. The Union 
is a center for social activities such as dances, receptions and movies, as well as special serv- 
ices for students of the professional schools. The SYNAPSE pub is located in the basement. 

The Union also coordinates the operation of new recreational facilities atop the Pratt Street 
Garage. Facilities include handball courts, squash courts, tennis courts, a basketball court, 
weight room, locker room, showers and saunas. A copy of the operational policy concerning 
use of the facilities is available in the Athletic Manager's Office on the premises. 

Publications 

Dental School and campus publications include the semi-annual Dental Newsletter, with ar- 
ticles concerning dental education at the School; The Maryland Probe, an informative student 
publication which deals with topics and current issues of interest to dental students and fac- 
ulty; Happenings, published bi-monthly; and Focus published three times annually, to report 
events and news of interest to alumni, faculty and friends of the UMAB campus. These publi- 
cations are distributed free of charge. 

In addition, a yearbook, The MIRROR, is published annually by student editors and staff; and 
each year the Student Dental Association compiles and distributes a Student Directory. 

Organizations 

The University of Maryland Student Dental Association. The University of Mary- 
land Student Dental Association is the organizational structure of the student body. It is pre- 
sided over and governed by elected representatives from each class and is represented on ap- 

58 




propriate committees of the Faculty Council. The organization participates in certain 
student-faculty activities and sponsors and directs all student social activities. It is responsible 
for the publication of the School's yearbook, The MIRROR, and the student newspaper, The 
Maryland Probe. The UMSDA is unique among dental student organizations in having formu- 
lated its own constitution and code of ethics. 

American Student Dental Association. With the aid'of the American Dental Associa- 
tion (ADA) this organization (ASDA) was established in February, 1971. Its primary purposes 
are to secure scholarships and loans and to assist in other student-related affairs. Included in 
the ASDA membership is a subscription to the ADA Journal. 

Student American Dental Hygienists' Association. Members of the Student Ameri- 
can Dental Hygienists' Association (SADHA) are involved in activities such as hosting guest 
speakers, conducting fund-raising projects, presenting table clinics and maintaining liaison 
with the state and local organizations. They also participate in meetings and discussion groups 
on a regional and national level. Student representatives attend the annual meeting of the 
American Dental Hygienists' Association. 

Student National Dental Association. The Maryland Chapter of the Student National 
Dental Association was founded in 1973. The primary objective of this organization is to fos- 
ter the admission, development, and graduation of Black dental and dental hygiene students. 
Among the activities in which the Maryland Chapter is engaged are minority recruitment, tu- 
toring, social and professional programs, and community and university relations. 

American Association of Dental Schools. The Association's objective is to promote 
the advancement of dental education, research and service in all appropriately accredited insti- 

59 



tutions that offer programs for dental personnel. The Association has three membership cate- 
gories: individual, student and honorary. Student members receive the Journal of Dental Edu- 
cation and the Dental Student News, published by the Association. During the year the local 
chapter conducts programs to promote the goals of this organization. One Dental School rep- 
resentative each from the dental, dental hygiene and postdoctoral student membership is 
elected to serve on the Council of Students of the American Association of Dental Schools 
(AADS). 

Gamma Pi Delta. Chartered in 1965. Gamma Pi Delta is an honorary' student dental organi- 
zation with scholarship and interest in the field of prosthetic dentistry as a basis for admission. 
The objective of the organization is the advancement of prosthetic dentistry through lectures, 
table clinics and other academic activities which will stimulate the creative interest of students 
and the profession in general. 

Gorgas Odontological Society. The Gorgas Odontological Society was organized in 
1916 as an honorary' student dental society with scholarship as a basis for admission. The Soci- 
ety was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas. a pioneer in dental education, a teacher of 
many years' experience and a major contributor to dental literature. It was with the idea of 
perpetuating his name that the Society adopted it. 

To be eligible for membership a student must rank in the highest 30 percent of his class. 
Speakers prominent in the dental and medical fields are invited to address members at 
monthly meetings. An effort is made to obtain speakers not connected with the University. 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon. Phi Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon. national honorary 
dental society, was chartered at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 
versity of Maryland during the 1928-1929 academic year. Students whose rank for the entire 
course of study is among the highest 20 percent of the class are eligible. This high honor is 
conferred upon those seniors who. in addition to scholarship, have demonstrated exemplary 
character traits and potential for future professional growth and attainment. 

Academy of General Dentistry. This organization is open to all students in the Dental 
School. General dentists with extraordinary experiences to share present lecture-discussion 
programs which are interesting to all. Meetings are held several times a year after school 
hours. 

American Society of Dentistry for Children. This organization meets once a month 
during lunch in a lecture-discussion format. Subjects as varied as nutrition for children to N 2 
in private practice are discussed. All students are welcome to join the ASDC. 

Big Brother/Sister Program. This is a voluntary effort on the part of each member of the 
sophomore class to help and advise a member of the incoming freshman class. It is hoped that 
this assistance will continue through graduation of each class. The program has been made an 
official standing committee of the SDA. 

Dental Hygiene Big Brother/Sister Program. This is a voluntary effort on the part of 
each member of the senior class to help and advise a member of the junior class. It is hoped 
that this assistance will continue through graduation of each class. 

Professional Dental Fraternities. The professional dental fraternity is a Greek letter or- 
ganization of men and women bonded together by ritual. It is a specialized fraternity which 
limits its membership to selected graduates and students enrolled and satisfactorily pursuing 
courses in an accredited college of dentistry. It is not an honorary fraternity or recognition so- 
ciety which confers membership to recognize outstanding scholarship. 

Its aim is to promote the high ideals and standards of its profession, advance the professional 
knowledge and welfare of its members, and provide a medium through which its members, 
with a common interest, can develop everlasting friendships. 

To do this, the professional dental fraternity follows a pattern in the selection and training of 
its members that stresses the importance of high professional ethics and practices: fosters ath- 
letic and social functions that stimulate the development of life-long friendships; conducts an 

60 



extensive program of speakers, tours, forums and research projects that are designed to 
broaden the professional knowledge of its members; and grants scholarships and awards that 
encourage professional proficiency and provide a service to its college and community. It 
complements the curriculum of the college and provides the cultural and social graces to 
round out the whole man. 

The following professional dental fraternities constitute the American Dental Interfraternity 
Council and have over 140 undergraduate chapters on campuses of the dental schools in this 
country: Alpha Omega, founded in 1907; Delta Sigma Delta, founded in 1882; Xi Psi Phi, 
founded in 1889; and Psi Omega, founded in 1892. These fraternities have more than 150 ac- 
tive alumni chapters scattered throughout the world. Eighty-five percent of those active in the 
dental profession have fraternity affiliation. 



Awards 

Awards are presented to senior students at graduation to recognize the following achieve- 
ments and qualities: 

Dentistry 

— highest scholastic average 

— grade point average among the ten highest in the class 

— highest average in basic biologic sciences 

— highest average in basic dental science 

— ethical standards, kindness and humanitarianism 

— professional demeanor 

— devotion to the School and the profession 

— characteristics of an outstanding general practitioner 

— the most professional growth and development 

— conscientious and enthusiastic devotion to clinical practice 

— high proficiency in clinical care and patient management 

— greatest proficiency in oral and maxillofacial surgery 

— excellence in fixed partial prosthesis 

— excellence in complete oral operative restoration 

— excellence in practical set of full upper and lower dentures 

— outstanding senior thesis/table clinic 

— achievement, proficiency and/or potential in each of the following specialty areas: 

— anesthesiology 

— dentistiy for children 

— dental radiology 

— endodontics 

— gold foil operation 

— operative dentistry 

— oral medicine 

— oral pathology 

— oral and maxillofacial surgery 

— orthodontics 

— periodontology 

Dental Hygiene 

— highest scholastic average 

— grade point average among the five highest in the class 

— humanitarianism, ethical standards and devotion to the profession 

— interest in and potential for active participation in professional organizations 

— interest and participation in the Student American Dental Hygienists' Association 

— outstanding clinical performance 

— outstanding leadership and participation in community activities and student and 
professional organizations 

61 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 




62 



The University of Maryland 

Board of Regents 

Mr. Peter F. O'Malley, Chairman, 1985 

The Honorable Joseph D. Tydings, Vice Chairman, 1984 

Mr. Percy M. Chaimson, Secretary, 1981 

Mr. A. Paul Moss, Treasurer, 1983 

Mrs. Mary H. Broadwater, Assistant Secretary, 1983 

Mr. George W. Wilson, Jr. Assistant Treasurer, 1981 

The Honorable Wayne A. Cawley, Jr., Ex officio 

Mr. Ralph W. Frey, 1981 

Dr. Samuel H. Hoover, 1982 

The Honorable Blair Lee, III, 1985 

Mr. Allen L. Schwait, 1984 

Mrs. Constance C. Stuart, 1985 

Mr. Wilbur G. Valentine, 1982 

Mrs. Jennifer A. Walker, 1981 

Mr. John W. T. Webb, 1985 

Central Administration 

President 

John S. Toll, B.S., Yale University, 1944; A.M., Princeton University, 1948; Ph.D., 1952. 

Executive Vice President 

Albin O. Kuhn, B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

Vice President for General Administration 

Warren B. Brandt, B.S., Michigan State University, 1944; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., University of 

Illinois, 1949. 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 

David Adamany, A.B., Harvard College, 1958; J.D., Harvard Law School, 1961; M.S., 

University of Wisconsin, 1963; Ph.D., 1967. 

Vice President for General Administration 

Warren W. Brandt, B.S., Michigan State University, 1944; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 

1949. 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research 

David S. Sparks, B.S., Grinnell College, Iowa, 1944; M.S., University of Chicago, 1945; 

Ph.D., 1951. 

Vice President for Agricultural Affairs and Legislative Relations 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr., B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

Vice President for University Development 

Robert G. Smith, B.S., State University of New York at Geneseo, 1952; M.A., Ohio Univer- 
sity, 1956. 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore 

Officers of the University 

President 

John S. Toll— B.S., Yale University, 1944; A.M., Princeton University, 1948; Ph.D., 1952. 

Chancellor 

Albin O. Kuhn— B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S. 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs 

John M. Dennis— B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1945. 

63 



Principal Academic Officers 

Dean, Dental School 

Errol L. Reese— B.S., Fairmont State College, 1960; D.D.S., West Virginia University, 

1963; M.S., University of Detroit, 1968. 

Dean, School of Law 

Michael J. Kelly — B.A., Princeton University, 1959; Ph.D., Cambridge University, 1964; 

LL.B., Yale University, 1967. 

Dean, School of Medicine 

John M. Dennis— B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.D., 1945. 

Dean, School of Nursing 

Nan B. Hechenberger — B.S., Villa Nova University, 1956; M.S., The Catholic University of 

America, 1959; Ph.D., 1974. 

Dean, School of Pharmacy 

William J. Kinnard, Jr.— B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Purdue 

University, 1957. 

Dean, School of Social Work and Community Planning 

Ruth H. Young— A. B., Wellesley College, 1944; M.S.S.W., The Catholic University of 

America, 1949; D.S.W., 1965. 

Acting Dean of Graduate and Interprofessional Studies and Research 
Rosslyn W.I. Kessel— Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1960. 

Director, University of Maryland Hospital 

G. Bruce McFadden — B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1957; M.H.A., Medical College 

of Virginia, 1961. 

Officers for Central and Administrative Services 

Assistant to the Chancellor 
Roy Borom 

Director, Admissions and Registrations 
Wayne A. Smith 

Director, Business Services 
Robert C. Brown 

Director, Health Sciences Computer Center 
Donn Lewis 

Director, Health Sciences Library 
Cyril O. Feng 

Director, Housing and Student Union 
Elaine D. Kacmarik 

Director, Personnel 
Ronald J. Baril 

Director, Physical Plant 
Robert L. Walton 

Manager, Purchasing and Director, Special Services 
Wade A. Jolliff 

Director, Student Health Services 
Wilfred H. Townshend, M.D. 

Director, University Relations 
Louise White 

64 




Administrative Officers of the Dental School 

Errol L. Reese, Dean 
B.S., Fairmont State College, 1960; 
D.D.S., West Virginia University, 1963; 
M.S., University of Detroit. 1968. 

Warren M. Morganstein, Associate Dean 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1966; 
D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1975. 

Ernest F. Moreland, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 
B.S., University of Georgia, 1960; 
M.A., Western Carolina University, 1962; 
Ed.D., Indiana University, 1967. 

John F Hasler, Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs 
B.S., Indiana University, 1958; 
D.D.S. 1962; M.S.D., 1969. 

Donald E. Shay, Assistant Dean for Biological Sciences 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; 

M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; Ph.D., 1943. 

Robert W. Haroth, Associate Dean for Continuing Education 
D.D.S. , University of Maryland, 1958; M.Ed., 1972. 

Charles B. Leonard, Jr., Assistant Dean for Recruitment and Admissions 

B.A., Rutgers College, 1955; M.S. University of Maryland, 1957; Ph.D. 1963. 

Mark L. Wagner, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs 
A.B., Birmingham Southern College, 1959; 
D.M.D., University of Alabama, 1963. 

Wilbur O. Ramsey, Assistant Dean for Advanced Specialty Education 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1943 



65 



THE FACULTY 

Faculty Emeriti 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S., Dean Emeritus 
Irving I. Abramson, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
Joseph C. Biddix, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
Edward C. Dobbs, D.D.S., B.S., Professor Emeritus 
Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
Gardner P. H. Foley, A.M., A.B., Professor Emeritus 
Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S.. Professor Emeritus 
John I. White, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus 
Riley S. Williamson, Jr., D.D.S., Professor Emeritus 
George McLean, M.D., Associate Professor Emeritus 
Ida M. Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S., Librarian Emeritus 

Faculty 

Abosch, John P., Lecturer. Oral Health Care Delivery. B.S., University of Baltimore, 1966. 

Abraham, George C, Assistant Clinical Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry. I.Sc. Nowrasjee Wadia College 
(India). 1958; B.D.S., Bombay University, 1964; M.S.. Loma Linda University, 1967. 

Abrams, Ronald G., Associate Professor. Pediatric Dentistry, B.S.. University of Massachusetts, 1958; D.M.D., 
Tufts University, 1962. 

Adams, Curtis, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Aks, Harry, Associate Professor, Oral Diagnosis, D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1937. 

Allen, Andrew L, Associate Professor. Periodontics. B.A.. Bowdoin College, 1963; D.M.D.. University of 
Pennsylvania, 1967; M.S., The George Washington University, 1973. 

Allen, William R., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Andrews, Robert H., Jr., Assistant Professor. Oral Health Care Delivery. B.A.. Hamilton College, 1970; 
D.D.S., Columbia University. 1974. 

Andrews, Stanley S., Associate Clinical Professor. Endodontics. B.S.. St. John's University, 1961. D.D.S.. 
New York University. 1965: M.S.D.. University of Washington, 1971. 

Apatoff, David, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery. B.A., University of Maryland. 1974; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland. 1977. 

Applefeld, Mark M., Lecturer, Oral Diagnosis. B.S.. Washington and Lee University. 1965; M.D., University of 
Maryland. 1969. 

Arafat, Amira H., Assistant Professor, Oral Pathology. D.D.S.. Damascus University (Syria). 1959: M.S.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1971. 

Arthur, Mark S., Assistant Professor, Pharmacology. A.B.. West Virginia University, 1964; M.S., 1966: 
D.M.D., Tufts University, 1970. 

August, David S., Associate Clinical Professor, Endodontics, D.D.S., Temple University, 1964. 

Bacharach, David P., Clinical Instructor. Oral Diagnosis. B.A., Case Western Reserve University. 1971: 
D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1975. 

Bailey, Donald W., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Balciunas, Birute A., Assistant Professor. Oral Diagnosis. B.S., Notre Dame College. 1970: D.D.S.. Case 
Western Reserve University, 1975; M.S.D., Indiana University. 1979. 

Balis, Sophia, Associate Clinical Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Athens (Greece), 1957: 
D.D.S.. University of Toronto (Canada), 1966. 

Barrett, William, Clinical Instructor. Oral Diagnosis. B.A.. University of Maryland. 1973: D.D.S.. 1977. 

Barry, Sue-Ning C, Professor, Anatomy, B.A., Barat College. 1955; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1961. 

Bashirelahi, Nasir, Associate Professor. Biochemistry. B.S.. Tehran University (Iran), 1960; Pharm. D.. 1962: 
M.S. University of Louisville. 1965; Ph.D.. 1968.' 

Bateman, Claudia B., Instructor. Educational and Instructional Resources. B.A.. Virginia Commonwealth Uni- 
versity. 1972: M.L.S.. University of Maryland. 1975. 

Beckerman, Todd, Associate Professor. Oral Pathology. B.A.. Emory University. 1959: D.D.S.. Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1963. 

66 






Bederson, Paul D., Clinical Instructor, Oral Diagnosis, D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1979. 

Beelat, Deanna L, Instructor, Oral Pathology, B.S., University of Maryland, 1975. 

Belt, Ogden M., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Bennett, Robert B., Assistant Professor. Physiology, B.A., Carleton College, 1960; M.S., University of Ne- 
braska, 1963; Ph.D., 1967. 

Bergman, Stewart A., Associate Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. B.A., Brooklyn College, 1964; 
D.D.S., State University of New York, 1968. 

Bergquist, John J., Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1954; M.S., 1970. 

Berman, Thomas A., Clinical Instructor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.A., University of Maryland, 1973; 
D.D.S., 1976. 

Bernstein, Edgar J., Clinical Field Assistant Professor. 

Beverly, Lois Y., Lecturer, Oral Diagnosis, B.S., Howard University, 1956; M.D., University of Maryland. 
1960. 

Biederman, Paul D., Assistant Clinical Professor. Pediatric Dentistry, B.S.. City University of New York, 1966 
D.D.S., State University of New York, 1970. 

Bloom, Jordan S., Associate Clinical Professor, Oral Diagnosis, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1949 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Bonebreak, Byron A., Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor, Orthodontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1968 
D.M.D., 1972; M.S., West Virginia University, 1977. 

Bowers, Gerald M., Professor, Periodontics. B.S., University of Michigan. 1950; D.D.S.. 1954; M.S., Ohio 
State University, 1962. 

Boyer, Rosemary, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Bradbury, John R., Assistant Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry. B.A.. Ohio State University, 1969; D.D.S., 
1972. 

Bradshaw, Natalie K., Clinical Instructor. Periodontics. A. A.. Essex Community College, 1975; A. A., Com- 
munity College of Baltimore, 1976. 

Braun, Martin, Lecturer. Oral Diagnosis. M.D.. University of Maryland. 1970. 

Breslow, Rosalind, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery. M.A.. Columbia University, 1968; M.S., 
University of Maryland, 1979. 

Brooks, John, Clinical Instructor, Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1974; D.D.S.. 1979. 

Brotman, I. Norton, Clinical Professor, Oral Diagnosis, D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1936. 

Buchanan, John L., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Buchness, George R, Associate Professor, Basic Dental Science, B.S., Loyola College, 1945; M.S.. Catholic 
University of America, 1954; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1961. 

Bushel, Arthur, Lecturer, Oral Health Care Delivery, A.B., Brooklyn College, 1940; D.D.S.. Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1943;M.P.H., 1947. 

Butler, Donald P., Assistant Clinical Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, D.D.S., Baylor University, 
1967. 

Buxbaum, Jerome D., Associate Clinical Professor. Phvsiology. B.S.. University of Marvland. 1951; D.D.S.. 
1955. 

Byrd, Byron K., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Canion, Seth B., Assostant Clinical Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., Howard University, 1969; D.D.S.. 
1973. 

Cappuccio, Joseph P., Clinical Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. B.S.. University of Rhode Island, 
1943; D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1946. 

Carpenter, Timothy, Clinical Field instructor. 

Carr, John, Associate Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry. B.S.. Howard University. 1948; D.D.S.. University 
of Maryland, 1946. 

Carr, Robert A., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Cavalli, Anthony, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Ceen, Richard S., Associate Professor, Orthodontics, B.S., University of Tennessee, 1965; D.D.S., 1966. 

Chan, Gregory, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Chang, Yung-Feng, Professor, Biochemistry, B.S., National Taiwan University, 1958; M.S., 1960; Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1966. 

Charles, Gerald S., Jr., Assistant Professor, Oral Diagnosis, B.S.. Howard University, 1965; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1975; M. PH., Harvard University, 1976. 

Chen, Charles C, Clinical Instructor. Periodontics. B.S., University of Maryland, 1976; D.D.S., 1980. 

Chmar, William E., Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics, B.S., Loyola College, 1965; D.D.S., Georgetown 
University, 1969. 

Christiansen, Richard L., Lecturer, Orthodontics. D.D.S.. University of Iowa, 1959; M.S.D.. Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1964; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1970. 

Cohen, Barry L., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Cohen, Leonard A., Assistant Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A.. George Washington University, 1967; 
D.D.S., Howard University. 1971; M. PH.. Harvard School of Public Health, 1974; M.S.. 1976. 

Coll, James A., Assistant Clinical Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S.. University of Pittsburgh, 1969; D.M.D.. 
1969; M.S.. University of Oregon, 1974. 

Costello, Leslie C, Professor, Physiology. B.S.. University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; Ph.D.. 1957. 

Courtade, Simon A., Assistant Professor, Biochemistry, B.A., Wesleyan University, 1949; M.S., University of 
Michigan. 1952; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1965. 

67 



Craig, James F., Associate Professor. Educational and Instructional Resources, B.S., Western Illinois University, 

1968; M.S.. Indiana University, 1970; Ed.D., 1972. 
Crooks, Edwin L, Assistant Clinical Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Randolf Macon College, 

1967; D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1973. 
Crossley, Harold L, Assistant Professor, Pharmacology. B.S.. University of Rhode Island, 1964; M.S., 1970; 

Ph.D., 1972; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1980. 
Cylus, Grant, Clinical Instructor. 
Dana, Allan H., Assistant Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of Miami, 1959; M.B.A., 

1961. 
Davidson, William M., Professor, Orthodontics, A.B., Dartmouth College, 1960; D.M.D., Harvard University, 

1965; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1969. 
Davis, John, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Delisle, Allan L, Associate Professor, Microbiology, B.S., University of California. 1960; M.S.. 1961; Ph.D., 

University of Massachusetts, 1968. 
Dent, George E., Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Georgetown University, 

1961; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1965. 
DePaola, Louis G., Instructor, Oral Diagnosis, B.A., University of Maryland, 1971; D.D.S., 1975. 
DeRenzis, Alfred J., Assistant Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery. B.S.. Muhlenberg College, 1967; D.M.D., 

University of Pittsburgh, 1971 . 
DeSai, Rajendra J., Associate Clinical Professor, Removable Prosthodontics. B.D.S., Nair Dental College (In- 
dia), 1961; D.D.S.. Howard University, 1971. 
DeVore, Duane T., Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, D.D.S., Loyola University (Chicago), 1956; 

Ph.D., University of London, 1975; J. D., University of Maryland. 1979. 
Diaz, Jose H., Associate Professor. Fixed Restorative Dentistry. B.A.. University of Puerto Rico, 1941; D.D.S., 

University of Maryland, 1950. 
Dietrich, Charles D., Clinical Instructor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S.. University of Maryland, 1972; 

D.D.S., 1977. 
DiGianni, Joseph M., Assistant Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., St. John's University, 1966; 

D.D.S.. Georgetown University, 1970; M.S., 1977. 
Dolle, Frank A., Clinical Professor. Pharmacology, B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 1950; Ph.D., 

1954; D.D.S., 1959. 
Donnelly, Charles J., Lecturer, Oral Health Care Delivery, A.B., University of Michigan, 1942; D.D.S., 1945; 

M.P.H., 1948. 
Dorenberg, Terry, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Downen, Craig T., Clinical Field Instructor. 
Dumsha, Thomas C, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, B.A., University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1972; 

M.S., University of Maryland, 1976; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 
Dusek, Thomas, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Eisen, Mark Z., Assistant Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Basic Dental Science, B.S., University of 

Maryland. 1969; D.D.S.. 1973. 
Eisenberg, Stephen B., Clinical Instructor, Oral Diagnosis/Oral Health Care Delivery. D.D.S., University of 

Maryland, 1977. 
Eklund, David C, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Eldridge, Roger L., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of Maryland Baltimore 

County, 1975; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 
Elias, Samia A., Assistant Professor, Removable Prosthodontics, B.D.S.. Alexandria University (Egypt), 1965. 
Emerson, Jane R., Instructor. Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University of Maryland. 1977. 
Eskow, Roy L., Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics, B.A., University of Maryland, M.A., 1971; D.D.S., 

1974. 
Everett, Marylou S., Instructor, Dental Hygiene, A.S., University of Bridgeport, 1966; B.S., University of 

Maryland, 1976. 
Falkler, William A., Jr., Associate Professor. Microbiology, B.A., Western Maryland College, 1966; M.S.. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1969; Ph.D., 1971. 
Faraone, Karen L., Instructor, Removable Prosthodontics, R.N., University of Maryland. 1974; B.S., 1974; 

D.D.S., 1978. 
Feldman, Sylvan, Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics, B.S., University of Maryland. 1962; D.D.S.. 1965. 
Fetchero, Pat, Associate Professor, Removable Prosthodontics. A.B., West Virginia University. 1949; D.D.S., 

University of Maryland, 1952. 
Fielder, Robert C, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Finagin, William B., Associate Clinical Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry. B.S., University of Maryland, 

1959;D.D.S., 1963. 
Fisher, Howard B., Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics. B.A.. C.W. Post College. 1972; D.D.S., Howard 

University, 1976. 
Fisher, Marc R., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.A., Penn State University, 1971; D.D.S., Temple University, 

1976. 
Fix, David W., Clinical Field Instructor. 
Franklin, Renty B., Associate Professor, Physiology, B.S., Morehouse College, 1966; M.S., Atlanta University, 

1967; Ph.D., Howard University, 1972. 



68 



Frazier, Paul D., Lecturer. Orthodontics, B.S., McPherson College, 1958; D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1961; 
Ph.D., University of Washington, 1971. 

Fridinger, William T, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Friend, Alvin, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Gabelman, David M., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Gartner, Leslie P., Associate Professor, Anatomy, B.A., Rutgers University, 1965; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., 1970. 

Gher, Marlin E., Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S., University of Missouri, 1971. 

Gildenhorn, Harry, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Gillespie, George, Lecturer, Oral Health Care Delivery, L.D.S., Royal College of Surgeons (London), 1955; 
D.D.S., University of Toronto (Canada), 1963; M.P.H., University of Michigan, 1964. 

Gingell, James C, Assistant Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1968; 
D.D.S., 1972. 

Golski, John J., Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1965. 

Gordon, Leonard S., Clinical Instructor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1973; 
D.D.S., 1979. 

Grace, Edward, Clinical Instructor. 

Graham, Barry G., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1969; D.D.S., 
1973. 

Graham, Marvin M., Clinical Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, A.B., Cornell University, 1938; A.M., 
1939; D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1943. 

Granet, Michael A., Assistant Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1978. 

Gravitz, Ronald F., Assistant Clinical Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1973; 
D.M.D., Tufts University, 1976. 

Greeley, James H., Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, D.D.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1959; M.S.D., 
Indiana University, 1966. 

Greene, Matthew R., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1974; 
D.D.S., 1978. 

Grewe, John M., Clinical Professor, Orthodontics, B.S., University of Minnesota, 1960; D.D.S., 1962; M.S.D., 
1964; Ph.D., 1966. 

Grieco, Michael F., Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor, Removable Prosthodontics, B.S., Saint Peters College, 
1952; D.D.S., Temple University, 1956. 

Griswold, William H., Lecturer, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1958; D.D.S., 1963. 

Gutmann, James L., Associate Professor, Endodontics, D.D.S., Marquette University, 1970. 

Hal pert, Lawrence F., Clinical Professor, Periodontics/Basic Dental Science, A.B., The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1958; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1962. 

Hamilton, McDonald K., Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, A.B., Alma College, 1952; D.D.S.. Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1956. 

Hamlet, Sandra, Lecturer, Orthodontics, B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1959; M.A., University of Washing- 
ton, 1967; Ph.D., 1970. 

Haroth, Robert W., Associate Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry. D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1958; 
M.Ed., 1972. 

Hasler, John F., Professor, Oral Diagnosis, B.S.. Indiana University, 1959; D.D.S., 1962; M.S.D., 1969. 

Hawkins, Irving, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Hawley, Charles E., Special Lecturer, Microbiology, A.B., The Johns Hopkins University, 1957; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1962; M.S., University of Illinois, 1970; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1976. 

Hayden, Arthur L., Assistant Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, D.M.D., University of Pittsburgh. 1945. 

Hayduk, Susan E., Assistant Professor. Periodontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1966; D.M.D., 1969. 

Heaton, John F., Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, 1970; D.M.D., Medical Univer- 
sity of South Carolina, 1979. 

Helrich, Martin, Lecturer, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., Dickinson College, 1946; M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1946. 

Hiatt, James L., Associate Professor, Anatomy, B.S., Ball State University, 1959; M.S., 1968; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1973. 

Higginbottom, Mark A., Assistant Clinical Professor, Orthodontics, B.A., Syracuse University, 1970; D.M.D.. 
University of Pennsylvania, 1974. 

Hill, Dulaney, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Hoffman, Barry, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Hoffman, Steven L., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1975. 

Holston, Alvan M., Jr., Assistant Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S.. University of Maryland. 1964; 
D.D.S., 1967. 

Horlick, Alan S., Clinical Instructor, Oral Diagnosis, B.A.. State University of New York, 1971; D.D.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1975. 

Hostetter, Patti G., Instructor, Basic Dental Science, A. A., Essex Community College, 1974; D.D.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 1979. 

Hovland, Eric J., Assistant Professor, Endodontics. B.S., University of Maryland, 1968; D.D.S., 1972; M.Ed., 
Virginia Commonwealth University, 1977; M.B.A., Loyola College, 1980. 

Hrechka, Kenneth M., Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 

Hurdle, Edward A., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Iddings, John R., Assistant Clinical Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Roanoke College, 1962; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1966. 

69 



Indyke, Gregory, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Jansen, Alfred H., Jr., Lecturer, Microbiology, D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1958; B.S., 1962; M.S., 1968. 

Jeffrey, Barbara G., Assistant Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Goucher College, 1973; D.D.S., 

University of Maryland, 1977. 
Jeffrey, Robert I., Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1974; M.A., 

1974. 
Jerbi, Frank C, Professor, Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S.. Loyola University (Chicago). 1939. 
Josell, Stuart D., Assistant Professor. Pediatric Dentistry, D.M.D., Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1974; M.S., 

University of Connecticut, 1979. 
Joseph, J. Mehsen, Special Lecturer, Microbiology, A.B.. West Virginia University, 1948; B.S., Univerity of 

Toledo, 1955; M.S., West Virginia University, 1949; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1951. 
Kahn, Jeffrey M., Assistant Professor, Periodontics, A.B., University of Pennsylvania. 1971: D.M.D., 1973. 
Karn, Kenneth S., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, D.D.S., University of the Pacific. 1976. 
KatZ, Nathan, Assistant Clinical Professor. Oral Diagnosis, D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1948. 
Keene, Kathleen L, Instructor, Dental Hygiene, B.S., Columbia University, 1976. 
Keiser, Mark L., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.A., University of Maryland, 1973; D.D.S.. 1978. 
Khan, Makhdoom A., Assistant Professor, Anatomy. B.S., West Virginia University. 1966; M.S., 1971; Ph.D., 

1976. 
Kidder, George W., Ill, Professor, Physiology, A.B., Amherst College, 1956: Ph.D., University of Pennsylva- 
nia. 1961. 
Kihn, Francis J., Clinical Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., Loyola College, 1952; D.D.S., University of 

Maryland, 1956. 
Kleinman, Dushanka V., Special Lecturer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1969; 

D.D.S., University of Illinois. 1973; M.Sc.D., Boston University, 1976. 
Kline, Richard, Clinical Field Assistant Professor. 
Kogan, Stanley, Assistant Clinical Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. D.D.S., University of Maryland, 

1954. 
Kowalewski, Edward J., Lecturer, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. B.S.. Gettysburg College, 1942; M.D., 

George Washington University. 1945. 
Krywolap, George W., Professor. Microbiology, B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1960; M.S., Pennsylvania 

State University, 1962; Ph.D., 1964. 
Krzeminski, Arthur E., Assistant Clinical Professor, Endodontics, B.S., University of Detroit, 1956; D.D.S.. 

1960. 
Kula, Katherine S., Assistant Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., University of Dayton, 1966; M.S., 1972; 

D.M.D., University of Kentucky, 1977; M.S., University of Iowa, 1979. 
Kulick, Walter K., Clinical Instructor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., St. Bonaventure University, 1973; 

D.M.D.. University of Pennsylvania. 1977. 
Kunken, Gilbert, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Kutcher, Mark J., Assistant Professor. Oral Diagnosis, B.A., Temple University. 1966: D.D.S.. 1970: M.S.. In- 
diana University, 1977. 
Kuzma, Edward, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Labelle, Ann D., Lecturer, Oral Health Care Delivery. B.S.. D"Youville College. 1970; B.S., Southeastern Mas- 
sachusetts University, 1974; M.S., M.P.H., Harvard University. 1976. 
Lackey, Woodrow, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Lambooy, John P., Professor, Biochemistry, B.A., Kalamazoo College, 1937; M.S., 1938; M.A., University of 

Illinois, 1939; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1942. 
LaParle, Frank A., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Lekas, James S., Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics, B.S., University of Illinois, 1956; D.D.S.. 1960. 
Lenoir, Thomas E., Clinical Field Instructor. 
Leonard, Charles B., Professor, Biochemistry, B.A., Rutgers College, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 

1957; Ph.D., 1963. 
Leupold, Robert J., Professor, Removable Prosthodontics, D.M.D., Tufts University, 1949; M.A.. George 

Washington University, 1975. 
Lever, Barry S., Associate Clinical Professor, Periodontics, B.S., University of Pittsburgh. 1954; D.D.S.. 1958. 
Levin, Elka S., Assistant Clinical Professor, Oral Diagnosis. B.S., National College J.F. Alcorta (Argentina). 

1946; D.D.S.. University of Buenos Aires (Argentina). 1951; M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 1970; 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1971. 
Levinson, Dennis, Assistant Clinical Professor. Endodontics. B.A., University of Marvland. 1968: D.D.S., 

1972. 
Levy, Bernard A., Associate Professor. Oral Pathology. A.B.. Ohio University, 1963; D.D.S.. Western Reserve 

University, 1966; M.S.D.. Indiana University. 1969. 
Libonati, Joseph P., Lecturer, Microbiology, M.S.. Duquesne University. 1965; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

1968. 
Light, Jack, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Lindenberg, Richard, Lecturer, Anatomy, M.D.. University of Berlin, 1944. 
Linthicum, Dorothy S., Clinical Instructor. Educational and Instructional Resources, B.S., Baylor University, 

1971: M.A.. University of Maryland, 1978. 
Livaditis, Gus J., Assistant Clinical Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry. D.D.S.. Temple University, 1970. 
Livingston, Herbert L., Associate Clinical Professor, Periodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; 

D.D.S.. Georgetown University, 1968. 

70 



Lombardi, John, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1978. 

Long, Earl V., Assistant Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery/AHEC, A.B.. University of West Virginia, 1952; 
M.S.. 1955; D.D.S., 1964. 

Long, ROSS E., Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor, Orthodontics, B.A., Dartmouth College. 1970: D.M.D., Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, 1978; M.S., 1978; Ph.D.. University of North Carolina, 1979. 

Lucas, Peter, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics. B.S., University of Maryland, 1971; M.S.. University of South- 
ern California, 1971; D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1978. 

Lunin, Martin, Professor, Oral Pathology, B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1938; D.D.S., Washington Univer- 
sity, 1950; M.P.H., Columbia University, 1952. 

Mackler, Bruce F., Associate Clinical Professor, Oral Pathology, B.A., Temple University, 1964; M.S., Penn 
State University, 1965; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1970. 

MacLeod, Douglas K., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Maddox, Elton P., Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Morgan State College. 
1968; D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1972. 

Mader, Carson L., Assistant Clinical Professor. Anatomy, A.B., Lafayette College, 1963; D.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1967; M.S.D., University of Indiana, 1974. 

Mandel, Bruce P., Clinical Instructor. Periodontics, B.A., Loyola College, 1975; D.D.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1979. 

Markotf, Bruce W., Clinical Instructor, Oral Diagnosis. B.S.. University of Maryland. 1973; D.D.S.. 1977. 

Mastrola, Frank W., Jr., Associate Professor. Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Providence College. 1956; 
D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1960. 

Mattocks, John H., Assistant Clinical Professor, Endodontics. B.S., Livingston College, 1964; D.D.S., Howard 
University, 1972. 

Maupln, John E., Clinical Field Instructor. 

McWilliams, Roger W., Assistant Clinical Professor, Oral Diagnosis, B.A., Colgate University, 1969; D.M.D., 
University of Pennsylvania. 1972; Ph.D.. 1976. 

Melller, Timothy F, Assistant Professor, Oral Diagnosis, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1970; D.D.S., 
University of Maryland, 1975; M.S., The Johns Hopkins University. 1978. 

Meszler, Richard M., Associate Professor. Anatomy, A.B., New York University, 1964; Ph.D., University of 
Louisville, 1969. 

Metzger, Cheryl T., Assistant Professor, Dental Hygiene, B.S., Ohio State University, 1967; M.S., University of 
Michigan, 1971. 

Miller, Richard A., Clinical Instructor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1974; D.D.S., 
1978. 

Miller, Susan S., Assistant Professor, Dental Hygiene, A.A.S., New York City Community College. 1960; B.S., 
Columbia University, 1974; M.S., Columbia University, 1975. 

Minah, Glenn E., Assistant Professor, Microbiology/Pediatric Dentistry, A.B.. Duke University, 1961: D.D.S., 
University of North Carolina, 1966; M.S.. University of Michigan. 1970; Ph.D.. 1976. 

Moffitt, William C, Associate Professor, Periodontics/Basic Dental Science, D.D.S.. Ohio State University. 
1956; M.S.. 1964. 

Moreland, Ernest F, Professor, Educational and Instructional Resources, B.S., University of Georgia. 1960; 
M.A., Western Carolina University. 1962; Ed.D., Indiana University. 1967. 

Morganstein, Warren M., Associate Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery. B.S.. University of Maryland. 1966: 
D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1975. 

Morris, Edwin L., Assistant Clinical Professor. Orthodontics, B.A.. University of Maryland, 1971; D.D.S.. 
1974. 

Mort, Kenneth E., Associate Clinical Professor. Removable Prosthodontics. D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 
1967; M.S.. University of Missouri. 1970. 

Mosca, John, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Mulford, Patricia L., Instructor. Dental Hygiene. B.S.. University of Maryland. 1974. 

Muller, Marshall K., Clinical Instructor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Wisconsin. 1964; 
D.M.D.. Washington University. 1977. 

Myslinski, Norbert R., Associate Professor, Physiology, B.S., Canisius College, 1969; Ph.D.. University of Illi- 
nois, 1973. 

Nauman, Robert K., Associate Professor, Microbiology. B.S.. Pennsylvania State University, 1963; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, 1965; Ph.D., 1968. 

Nelson, Joseph, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Nelson, Sharon L., Assistant Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry. B.S.. Whitworth College. 1969; D.D.S., 
University of Washington, 1976. 

Niswander, Jerry, D., Clinical Professor. Orthodontics. D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1955; M.S., 1962. 

Norris, James P., Clinical Professor. Endodontics. B.S.. University of Maryland. 1950; D.D.S., 1956. 

Ochfeld, Lawrence J., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Oryshkevych, Yaromyr, Special Lecturer, Microbiology. M.S., Baylor University. 1969; D.D.S.. University of 
Maryland. 1971. 

Overholser, C. Daniel, Jr., Associate Professor, Oral Diagnosis. B.S.. University of Notre Dame. 1966; 
D.D.S.. Indiana University, 1970; M.S.D., 1972. 

Owen, David G., Associate Professor. Pediatric Dentistry. A.B.. Syracuse University, 1960; D.D.S.. McGill Uni- 
versity, 1964; A.M.. University of Chicago. 1969. 

Paden, Lawrence, Clinical Field Instructor. 

71 



Page, Lawrence R., Associate Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S., University of Michigan, 1968; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1975. 

Park, Jon K., Associate Professor, Oral Diagnosis, D.D.S., University of Missouri, 1964; B.A., Wichita State 
University, 1969; M.S., University of Missouri, 1971. 

Parker, Elaine, Instructor, Dental Hygiene, B.S., University of Maryland, 1977. 

Payne, Thomas M., Assistant Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1968; M.S., 
1976; D.D.S., 1978. 

Peterson, Douglas E., Assistant Professor, Oral Diagnosis, D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1972; Ph.D., 
1976. 

Peterson, Leslie Angell, Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, A.S., University of Vermont, 1975; B.S., 1976. 

Piavis, George W., Professor, Anatomy, A.B., Western Maryland College, 1948; M.Ed., 1952; Ph.D., Duke 
University, 1958. 

Pierre, Lawton J., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Plessett, David N., Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics,. B. A., Pennsylvania State University, 1949; 
D.D.S., Temple University, 1958. 

Prater, Larry D., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Provenza, D. Vincent, Professor, Anatomy, B.S., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; Ph.D., 1952. 

Quarantillo, Edward P., Associate Professor, Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S., University of Pittsburgh, 
1938. 

Quarantillo, Frederick J., Assistant Clinical Professor, Endodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1969; 
D.D.S., 1973; M.S., George Washington University, 1978. 

Quinton, Debra J., Clinical Instructor, Dental Hygiene, A. A., Broome Community College, 1972; B.S., Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1979. 

Rabin, E. Marvin, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Rabin, Harriet K., Instructor/ Academic Advisor, Dental Hygiene, B.S., University of Maryland, 1974. 

Ramsey, Wilbur O., Professor, Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Reese, Errol L., Professor, Removable Prosthodontics, B.S., Fairmont State College, 1960; D.D.S., West Vir- 
ginia University, 1963; M.S., University of Detroit, 1968. 

Richardson, Willie J., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Richter, Henry E., Jr., Associate Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. B.S., University of Maryland, 1954; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1958. 

Riger, Michael J., Assistant Clinical Professor, Orthodontics, B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo, 
1970; D.M.D., Tufts University, 1974; M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo, 1979. 

Rogers, Vincent C, Lecturer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A., University of Maryland, 1966; D.D.S., 1971; 
M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins University, 1975. 

Romberg, Elaine, Assistant Professor, Educational and Instructional Resources, B.S., Vassar College, 1960; 
M.Ed., Lesley College, 1963; Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 1977. 

Rubinstein, Linda, Instructor, Dental Hygiene, B.S., University of Maryland, 1976. 

Rubier, Constance G., Clinical Instructor, Orthodontics, B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic, 1973; B.S., 1974; 
M.S., 1975; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 

Rudo, Frieda G., Professor, Pharmacology, A.B., Goucher College, 1944; M.S., University of Maryland, 1960; 
Ph.D., 1963; D.Sc, Goucher College, 1976. 

Rule, James T., Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., Temple University, 1953; D.D.S., 1957; M.S., University 
of Chicago, 1960. 

Rullman, Martha S., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., Old Dominion University, 1972. 

Russell, Donald G., Clinical Instructor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry. D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Sachs, Joseph K., Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1974. 

Sachs, Myron H., Associate Clinical Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, D.D.S.. Columbia University, 1939. 

Sachs, Robert I., Clinical Instructor, Oral Diagnosis, B.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1967; M.S., Purdue 
University, 1972; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 

Sanidad, Orlando R., Clinical Instructor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, D.M.D., University of the East (Philip- 
pines), 1960; B.A., Ohio State University, 1969; D.D.S.. 1972. 

Savel, Jerome J., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Savill, Sandra J., Assistant Professor. Dental Hygiene, A. A.. Southern Illinois University, 1964; B.A., Eastern 
Illinois University, 1974; M.Ed., Washington University, 1977. 

Scheitler, Lawrence E., Assistant Clinical Professor, Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University of Illinois, 1971; 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1975. 

ScherliS, Sidney, Associate Clinical Professor, Anatomy, B.A.. University of Pennsylvania, 1934; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 1938. 

Schindler, Fred, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Schmunk, Terry, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Schoenbrodt, Frederick A., Assistant Clinical Professor, Orthodontics, B.A., Gettysburg College, 1965 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1969: M.S., Georgetown University, 1975. 

Schubert, Lloyd V., Jr., Clinical Instructor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1974 
D.D.S., 1978. 

Schulz, Earle M., Jr., Associate Clinical Professor, Pediatric Dentistry, B.S., University of Maryland, 1960 
D.D.S., 1962; M.S., University of Iowa, 1972. 

Schunick, Howard E., Associate Clinical Professor, Endodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 1961; D.D.S.. 
1962. 

72 



Schwartz, Harry B., Assistant Clinical Professor, Removable Prosthodontics, B.S., University of Maryland, 

1961; D.D.S., 1965. 
Schweizer, Peter J., Lecturer, Oral Halth Care Delivery, M.B.A., Dickinson College, 1968. 
Scornavacca, Ronald J., "Assistant Clinical Professor, Orthodontics, B.S., Villanova University, 1964; 

D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1968. 
Seibel, Werner, Associate Professor, Anatomy, B.A., Brooklyn College, 1965; M.A., Hofstra University, 1968; 

Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University. 1972. 
Shane, Sylvan, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Shay, Donald E., Professor, Microbiology, B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 

1938; Ph.D., 1943. 
Shelton, Charles S., Clinical Field Instructor. 
Shelton, Preston G., Associate Professor, Pediatric Dentistry. B.S., John Carroll University, 1963; D.D.S., 

University of Michigan, 1967; M.S., University of Nebraska, 1971. 
Shockett, Howard P., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1979. 
Shulman, Eli M., Associate Clinical Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, A.B.. Ohio State University, 1942; 

D.D.S., 1947. 
Shulman, Mark, Clinical Instructor, Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1971; D.D.S., 1975. 
Siegel, Sherril, Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, B.S., Columbia University, 1973; D.M.D., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1978. 
SMberman, Paul B., Clinical Instructor, Oral Diagnosis, B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1972; D.D.S., 

University of Maryland, 1977. 
Silverman, Wayne, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Sindler, Arnold J., Assistant Clinical Professor. Periodontics, B.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1966; 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1976. 
Singer, Jacquelyn L., Assistant Professor. Dental Hygiene. B.A., Ohio State University, 1968; M.S., Old Do- 
minion University, 1976. 
Smith, Channing D., Clinical Field Instructor. 
Smith, Mary Y., Assistant Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of Maryland, 1973; A. A., 

R.N., Howard Community College, 1980. 
Smith, Richard J., Assistant Professor, Orthodontics, B.A., Brooklyn College, 1969; M.S.. Tufts University, 

1973; D.M.D., 1973. 
Smith, Wallace G., Ill, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Snyder, Merrill J., Special Lecturer, Microbiology, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; M.S., University of 

Maryland, 1950; Ph.D.. 1953. 
Snyder, Thomas L., Associate Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., St. Joseph's College, 1967; D.M.D., 

University of Pennsylvania, 1971; M.B. A., 1974. 
Sobkov, Theodore S., Clinical Professor, Periodontics, B.A., University of Maryland, 1958; D.D.S., 1962. 
Soble, Rosalynde K., Assistant Professor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.A.. University of Maryland, 1944; 

M.S.W.. 1965; Ph.D., 1976. 
Sorrell, Paula, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Staling, Leah, Assistant Research Professor, Physiology, B.S., University of Maryland, 1944; M.S., 1952. 
Stannard, Gary L., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Stevens, Mark S., Associate Professor, Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S., St. Louis University, 1960. 
Strassler, Howard E., Assistant Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., State University of New York, 

1971; D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1975. 
Straube, William D., Assistant Clinical Professor, Removable Prosthodontics, B.S., Oregon State University, 

1965; D.M.D., University of Oregon, 1967; M.S. D., University of Washington, 1973. 
Strauss, Howard, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Streckfus, Charles, Clinical Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1970; 

M.S., Towson State College, 1973; D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1978. 
Strozykowski, Joseph, Clinical Field Instructor. 
Sullivan, Craig D., Clinical Instructor, Oral Diagnosis, B.A., Towson State University, 1973; D.D.S., University 

of Maryland. 1977. 
Summerhays, Gerald S., Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics, B.A.. University of Utah, 1969; D.D.S., 

University of Washington. 1973. 
Suzuki, Jon B., Clinical Instructor, Periodontics, B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1968; Ph.D., Illinois Insti- 
tute of Technology, 1971; D.D.S., Loyola University, 1978. 
Swancar, James R., Associate Professor, Oral Pathology, B.A., Western Reserve University. 1952; D.D.S., 

1956; M.S.. 1963. 
Sweeney, Kevin P., Clinical Instructor. Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S., Manhattan College, 1974; D.D.S.. 

University of Maryland, 1978. 
Sweren, Edgar, Assistant Clinical Professor, Orthodontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1954. 
Swinehart, D. Robert, Clinical Professor. Orthodontics, A.B., Dartmouth College, 1933; D.D.S., University of 

Maryland. 1937. 
Sydiskis, Robert J., Associate Professor. Microbiology. B.A.. University of Bridgeport. 1961; Ph.D.. North- 
western University, 1965. 
Sydney, Sheldon B., Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics, D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1975. 
Tewes, Warren D., Assistant Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.S.. Randolph-Macon College, 1971; 

D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1975. 

73 



Thompson, Van P., Assistant Professor. Basic Dental Science. B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1966; 
Ph.D., 1971; D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1979. 

Thut, Paul D., Associate Professor, Pharmacology, A.B., Hamilton College, 1965; M.S.. University of Rhode Is- 
land, 1968; Ph.D., Dartmouth College, 1971. 

Tilghman, Donald M., Associate Clinical Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1958; D.D.S.. 1961. 

Trager, Michael B., Clinical Instructor, Endodontics, B.A., University of California Los Angeles, 1975; 
D.M.D., Washington University. 1978. 

Trotter, Powell B., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Ude, James A., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Vandenberge, John, Clinical Field Instructor. 

VandenBosche, Raoul C, Assistant Clinical Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentsitry. A.B.. College of the Holy 
Cross, 1962; D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1966. 

Vandermer, Jack D., Assistant Clinical Professor. Oral Diagnosis, B.S., Pennsylvania State University. 1963; 
D.D.S.. University of Maryland. 1967; M.Ed.. 1973. 

Varlpatis, Stephen M., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Vernino, Arthur R., Assistant Clinical Professor, Periodontics. B.A., St. Vincent's College. 1956; D.D.S.. Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh. 1960. 

Wagley, Philip C, Associate Professor. Removable Prosthodontics, D.D.S.. University of Pennsylvania, 1943; 
M.P.H.. The Johns Hopkins University, 1971. 

Wagner, Mark L, Associate Professor, Pediatric Dentistry. A.B.. Birmingham Southern College, 1959; D.M.D., 
University of Alabama, 1963. 

Walker, Michael R., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Wank, Harvey, Clinical Instructor. Orthodontics, A.B., City University of New York, 1968; D.M.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1973. 

Ward, George T., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Warren, Stephen R., Assistant Professor, Endodontics. B.S.. Brescia College, 1971; D.M.D.. University of 
Kentucky. 1975. 

Weiner, Lowell B., Clinical Instructor. Physiology. A. A.. Montgomery Jr. College, 1962; B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1964; D.D.S., Howard University, 1968. 

Weiner, Stephen A., Assistant Clinical Professor. Oral Diagnosis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1965; D.D.S., 
1969. 

Weinman, Jonathan H., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Weinstein, Paul, Lecturer, Oral Health Care Delivery, B.S., City College of New York, 1949; B.L., New York 
University, 1952. 

Whitaker, George C, Assistant Professor. Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.A., Earlham College, 1970; D.D.S., 
Howard University, 1974; M.S.D., Indiana University, 1977. 

Williams, George C, Instructor, Oral Health Care Delivery. B.S.. Washington College, 1971: D.D.S.. Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1978. 

Williams, George H., Ill, Assistant Professor, Fixed Restorative Dentistry. B.S.. Tusculum College, 1962; 
D.D.S.. University of Maryland, 1966. 

Williams, Henry R., Jr., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Williams, Lisa T, Instructor. Oral Diagnosis, B.S.. University of Maryland, 1978. 

Williams, Robert E., Jr., Assistant Professor. Orthodontics. B.S.. University of Pittsburgh. 1965; D.M.D.. 
1969. 

Winson, Dennis E., Associate Clinical Professor. Periodontics. B.S.. University of Maryland, 1961: D.D.S., 
Georgetown University. 1965. 

Witbeck, Ernest, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Wood, Morton, Assistant Professor. Fixed Restorative Dentistry, B.A., American International College. 1965: 
D.D.S.. University of Maryland. 1969; M.Ed.. The Johns Hopkins University. 1979. 

Wood, Robert, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Woods, Robin, Clinical Instructor. 

Woolridge, Edward D., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Wyett, Ronald, Clinical Field Instructor. 

Wyman, Frederick N., Clinical Field Instructor. 

Wynn, Richard L., Associate Professor, Pharmacology, B.S., University of Maryland, 1964; M.S., 1966; 
Ph.D.. 1970. 

Zeller, Gregory G., Instructor. Fixed Restorative Dentistry. D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1975. 

Zeren, Karl J., Assistant Clinical Professor. Periodontics. B.S.. University of Maryland, 1969: D.D.S.. 1975. 

Zupnik, Robert M., Clinical Professor. Periodontics. B.S.. University of Maryland, 1954: D.D.S.. Georgetown 
University. 1958; M.S.D., Boston University. 1964. 



74 



ASSOCIATE STAFF 

Baier, Richard G., Removable Prosthodontics, A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 1976. 

Britt, John W., Fixed Restorative Dentistry. 

Charles, Ambrose K., Biochemistry, B.S., University of Kerala, 1963; M.S., University of Baroda, 1970; 

Ph.D., University of Delhi, 1974. 
Kavali, Tony M., Central Clinic Services. 

King, William R, Jr., Removable Prosthodontics, A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 1971. 
Kreutzer, Lawrence W., Orthodontics. 

Land, Myra R., Educational and Instructional Resources, B.A., Goucher College, 1956. 
Organ, Robert J., Periodontics. 

Savopoulos, Nell M., Dean's Office, B.A., Mary Washington College, 1953. 
SulS, Frederick J., Fixed Restorative Dentistry, A. A., Community College of Baltimore, 1972. 
Truelove, Rosalind B., Pediatric Dentistry, A.S.. University of Bridgeport, 1962. 

Deans of Dental Schools in Baltimore 

Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Chapin A. Harris 1840-1841 

Thomas E. Bond 1841-1842 

Washington R. Handy 1842-1853 

Philip H. Austen 1853-1865 

Ferdinand J.S. Gorgas 1865-1882 

Richard B. Winder 1882-1894 

M. Whilldin Foster 1894-1914 

William G. Foster 1914-1923 

Maryland Dental College 
1873-1878 

(Merged with Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 1878) 

Richard B. Winder 1873-1878 

Dental Department 
University of Maryland 

(Founded 1882) 

Ferdinand J.S. Gorgas 1882-1911 

Timothy O. Heatwole 191 1-1923 

Dental Department 

Baltimore Medical College 

1895-1913 

(Merged with University of Maryland in 1913) 

J. William Smith 1895-1901 

William A. Montell 1901-1903 

J. Edgar Orrison 1903-1904 

J. William Smith 1904-1913 

Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Dental School 
University of Maryland at Baltimore 

(Baltimore College of Dental Surgery consolidated with University of Maryland in 1923) 

Timothy O. Heatwole 1923-1924 

J. Ben Robinson 1924-1953 

Myron S. Aisenberg 1953-1963 

John J. Salley 1963-1974 

Errol L. Reese 1974- 

75 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association is an independent organization of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland at Baltimore, representing approximately 
5,000 graduates world wide. With headquarters in the Dental School and five chartered 
sections, the Association is actively interested in the organizational structure of the School. 

The annual meeting is held during Alumni Week and coincides with graduation. Quarterly 
meetings are held during the year at which time Association business is conducted. 

Throughout the year alumni receptions are held throughout the country, and officers of the 
Association participate whenever possible. In addition, social affairs are held at the Dental 
School for the students and alumni. 

Yearly the Association honors one of the alumni by bestowing the Distinguished Alumnus 
Award. This is the highest award the Association can bestow. 



Alumni Association Officers 1980 



President 

Dr. George H. Williams III 
12116 Jerusalem Road 
Kingsville, Maryland 21C87 



66 



President-Elect 
Dr. Robert V. Bates '56 
10634 York Road 
Cockeysville, Maryland 21030 

First Vice President 
Dr. Joe N. Price 52 
6921 Annapolis Road 
Landover Hills, Maryland 20784 

Second Vice President 
Dr! William Strahan '48 
220 University Boulevard. West 
Silver Spring. Maryland 20901 



Secretary 

Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio '46 
6810 North Charles Street 
Towson, Maryland 21204 

Recording Secretary 

Dr. Robert W. Haroth '58 

Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

Baltimore. Maryland 21201 

Treasurer 

Dr. J. Philip Norris '56 
1207 Frederick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 



Editor 

Dr. Kyrle W. Preis 

Mt. Vista and Belair Roads 

Kingsville. Maryland 21087 

Historian- Archivist 
Mr. Gardner P. H. Foley 
4407 Sedgwick Road 
Baltimore. Maryland 21210 

Past President 
Dr. Charles L. Page, Jr. '53 
8403 Loch Raven Boulevard 
Baltimore. Maryland 21204 




76 



tiu,+.~.*-.. 




University Alumni Council Representatives 



Dr. Harry W. F. Dressel '45—1980 
6340 Frederick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

Dr. Clayton S. McCarl '56—1981 

28 Ridge Road 

Greenbelt, Maryland 20770 



Dr. James R. Sullivan '57—1982 
419 Burnt Mills Avenue 
Silver Spring, Maryland 20901 



Alternates 

Dr. Robert P. Fleishman 



'63 



1134 York Road 
Lutherville, Maryland 21093 



Dr. Roy Eskow '74 
5225 Pooks Hill Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 20014 

Dr. D. Michael Brown '61 

Suite 211, Capitol Plaza Building 

Landover Hills. Maryland 20784 



Executive Council 

George H. Williams, III '66 
Kingsville. Maryland 

Robert V. Bates '56 
Cockeysville, Maryland 

Joe N. Price '52 
Landover Hills, Maryland 

William Strahan '48 
Silver Spring. Maryland 

Joseph P. Cappuccio '46 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Robert W. Haroth '58 
Baltimore, Maryland 

J. Philip Norris '56 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Kyrle W. Preis '29 
Kingsville. Maryland 

Gardner P. H. Foley 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Charles L. Page, Jr. '53 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Elected Members 
Hector DiNardo '53—1980 
York Road and 
Greenmeadow Drive 
Timonium. Maryland 21093 

Raymond Palmer. Jr. '56—1980 
201 Baltimore and Annapolis 
Boulevard. NW 
Glen Burnie, Marvland 21061 



Don N. Brotman '55—1981 

Horizon House 

Baltimore. Maryland 21202 

William Schunick '34—1981 
2707 Glen Avenue 
Baltimore. Maryland 21215 

Gerald Eskow '51—1982 
3001 Sollers Point Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21222 

Robert Murphy '56—1982 
605 Baltimore and Annapolis 

Boulevard 
Severna Park, Marvland 21 146 



Endowment Fund Trustees 



Trustees ex officio 

George H. Williams, III '66, President 
Robert V. Bates '56. President-Elect 
Joseph P. Cappuccio '46. Secretary 
J. Philip Norris '56, Treasurer 
Errol L. Reese, Dean 

Elected Trustees 

William E. Wolfel. Jr. '53—1980 
5200 Baltimore National Pike 
Baltimore, Maryland 21229 



Paul Hoffman '27—1980 
10401 Old Georgetown Road 
Bethesda, Maryland 20014 

Alex Boro '38—1981 

201 South Southwood Avenue 

Annapolis, Maryland 21401 

Frank Dolle '59—1981 
1213 Dulaney Valley Road 
Towson, Maryland 21204 



D. Robert Swinehart '37—1982 
Medical Arts Building 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Kenneth W. Price '53—1982 

9801 Georgia Avenue 

Silver Spring. Maryland 20902 



77 



Past Recipients of the Distinguished Alumnus Award 

1956 George M. Anderson '19 1963 Grayson W. Gaver '22 1972 Meyer Eggnatz '28 

1957 No Award 1964 Conrad L. Inman, Sr. '15 1973 Ernest B. Nuttall '31 

1958 J. Ben Robinson '14 1965 Rudolph O. Schlosser '03 1974 Kenneth Randolph '39 
1958 Frank J. Houghton 17 1965 Arthur I. Bell '19 1975 Samuel Hoover '25 
1958 Harry B. McCarthy '23 1966 Daniel F. Lynch '25 1976 Harry Levin '26 

1958 Myron S. Aisenberg '22 1967 Samuel Pruzansky '45 1977 Lewis Fox '27 

1959 Howard Van Natta '14 1968 Saul Gale '22 1978 Joseph P. Cappuccio '46 

1960 Gen. Robert H. Mills '07 1969 F. Noel Smith '23 1979 Kyrle W. Preis '29 

1961 James E. John '13 1970 A. James Kershaw '32 1980 Irving Abramson '32 

1962 J. Stephenson Hopkins '05 1971 C. Adam Bock '22 



Past Presidents of the Alumni Association 

(Since the merger of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery with the Dental School, 
University of Maryland, June, 1923) 

*Frank P. Duffy '06 1922-1930 

♦B. Lucien Brun '05 1930-1933 

*Wiley W. Smith '00 1933-1934 

*B. Sargent Wells, Sr. '14 1934-1935 

George M. Anderson '19 1935-1936 

*Arthur I. Bell '19 1936-1939 

*Harry E. Kelsey '96 1939-1940 

Brice M. Dorsey '27 1940-1941 

♦Leonard I. Davis '21 1941-1942 

♦James H. Samuel '14 1942-1944 

*F. Noel Smith '23 1944-1945 

♦Elmer F. Corey '28 1945-1946 

*C. Adam Bock '22 1946-1947 

♦Paul A. Deems '28 1947-1948 

Arthur L. Davenport '10 1948-1949 

Conrad L. Inman, Sr. '15 1949-1950 

Harry B. McCarthy '23 1950-1951 

♦Thomas J. Bland, Jr. '17 1951-1952 

Harry Levin '26 1952-1953 

Eugene L. Pessagno. Jr. '40 1953-1954 

♦Albert Cook '33 1954-1955 

♦Lawrence Bimestefer '34 1955-1956 

♦Gerard Devlin (♦) '23 1956-1957 

Frank Hurst '27 1956-1957 

♦Daniel E. Shehan '22 1957-1958 

Edwin G. Gail '18 1958-1959 

Harry Dressel '45 1959-1960 

Daniel Lynch '25 1960-1961 

Joseph Cappuccio '46 1 96 1 - 1 962 

♦Lewis Toomey '42 1962-1963 

♦L. Lynn Emmart '22 1963-1964 

Calvin Gaver '54 1964-1965 

Irving Abramson '32 1965-1966 

Ashur Chavoor '48 1966-1967 

J. Philip Norris '56 1967-1968 

Eugene Leatherman '54 1968-1969 

Meyer Eggnatz '28 1969-1970 

Ernest Nuttall '31 1970-1971 

Joseph Seipp '55 1971-1972 

Leon Seligman '33 1972-1973 

Francis Veltre '59 1973-1974 

William Patteson '57 1974-1975 

Kyrle Preis '29 1975-1976 

Conrad Inman, Jr. '44 1976-1977 

Michael Ventura '50 1977-1978 

Charles Page, Jr. '53 1978-1979 

George H. Williams, III '66 1979-1980 

♦ Deceased 
(*) Resigned 

78 



STATEMENT OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland at Balti- 
more is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution. It adheres to all federal and 
state laws and regulations on nondiscrimination regarding race, color, religion, age, na- 
tional origin or sex. It adheres to all federal and state laws and regulations on nondiscrimi- 
nation regarding physical or mental handicap. 

Students are considered for admission to the University of Maryland Dental School without 
regard to race, color, creed or sex. It is the objective of the School to enroll students with di- 
versified backgrounds in order to make the educational experience more meaningful for each 
individual as well as to provide dental health practitioners to all segments of the community. 

The Dental School is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Dental and Dental 
Auxiliary Educational Programs of the Council on Dental Education of the American Den- 
tal Association. 

The University of Maryland has been elected to membership in the Association of Ameri- 
can Universities. This Association, founded in 1900, is an organization of those universi- 
ties in the United States and Canada generally considered to be preeminent in the fields of 
graduate and professional study and research. 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between 
the student and the University of Maryland. The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement at any time within the student's term of residence. The Uni- 
versity further reserves the right, at any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it con- 
siders such action to be in the best interests of the University. 




79 



CAMPUS MAP 





« u 




20¥ 











BUILDING KEY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



Medical Technology. School of 
Pharmacy. Physical Therapy. 
Radiologic Technology classrooms, 
offices, laboratories 
Alpha House. 828 N. Eutaw Street 
(off campus) 

Baltimore Union. 621 W Lombard 
Street 

Cafetena. student housing, meeting 
rooms for students and faculty, 
lounges, game room. Synapse 
Bressler Research Building. 29 S 
Greene Street 

Medical school research labs. Balti- 
more offices of the university's 
Board of Regents 

Walter P Carter Center. 630 W 
Fayette Street 

The university uses this facility 
jointly with the Inner City Mental 
Health Program and the State De- 
partment of Mental Hygiene. 
Community Pediatric Center. 412 
W Redwood Street (off campus) 
Innovative program of comprehen- 
sive health care for children in 
southwestern health distnct Feder- 
ally funded 

Davidge Hall. 522 W Lombard 
Street 

Built in 1812 and designed by Rob- 
ert Carey Long Sr . who used the 
Pantheon in Rome as his model 
The oldest building in the nation 
used continuously for medical edu- 
cation The university's Medical 
Alumni Association plans to restore 
the building to its onginal state and 
open it to the public as a medical 
museum 

Dunning Hall. 636 W. Lombard 
Street 

School of Pharmacy classrooms and 
offices, drug manufactunng lab. poi- 
son information center 



9 Fayette Street Garage. 633 W Fay- 
ette Street 

10 Gray Laboratory. 520 Rear W 
Lombard Street 

Physical Therapy Office. Campus 
Police, Center for the Graduate 
Social Work Education of the Hear 

11 ing Impaired 

Hayden-Hams Hall. 666 W Balti- 
more Street 

Baltimore College of Dental Sur 
gery. Dental School, clinics, class 
rooms, labs, offices 

12 Health Sciences Computer Center. 
610 W Lombard Street 
Computer Center, pharmacy school 
offices and labs. Medical Technol 
ogy labs. Division of Clinical Investi- 
gation. Office of Student Affairs. 

13 Health Sciences Library. Ill S. 
Greene Street 

Main library for all professional 
schools except the School of Law 
Includes histoncal book collection 
and computerized circulation and 
information services 

14 Howard Hall, 660 W Redwood 
Street 

Central Administration offices, med 
ical school classrooms, offices, labs 

15 Howard Hall Tower. 655 W Balti 
more Street 

Medical school classrooms, offices, 
labs Administrative offices of the 
medical school, including the office 
of dean and vice chancellor 

16 Institute of Psychiatry and Human 
Behavior. 645 W Redwood Street 
(E. F and G wings of the hospital) 
The medical school's center for psy- 
chiatric teaching and research as 
well as inpatient and outpatient 
care 

17 Kelly Memonal Building. 650 W. 
Lombard Street 

Headquarters of Maryland Pharma 
ceutical Association B Olive Cole 
Museum 



18 Lane Hall. 500 W Baltimore Street 
School of Law classrooms, offices, 
library. Developmental Disabilities 
Law Clinic 

19 Legal Services Clinic. 116 N Paca 
Street 

20 Lombard Building. 511 W Lorn 
bard Street 

Bookstore. University Relations. 

21 Maryland Institute for Emergency 
Medical Services. 22 S Greene 
Street 

The first major trauma program in 
the nation, combining multidisciph 
nary teaching and research with ex- 
pert round-the-clock care for the 
cntically ill and injured in the state 

22 Medical School Teaching Facility. 
10 S Pine Street 

Medical school classrooms, offices, 
research labs, animal facility. Office 
of Medical Education. Illustrative 
Services 

23 Medical Technology Building. 31 S 
Greene Street 

Medical school offices, labs. 

24 Mencken House. 1524 Hollins 
Street (off campus) 

25 Methadone Program. 104 N 
Greene Street (off campus) 

26 National Pituitary Agency. 210 W. 
Fayette Street (off campus) 
Under contract with the National 
Institutes of Health, the University 
of Maryland administers the NPA. 
which is the official agency for col 
lection and distribution of human 
pituitary hormones for research pur- 
poses 

27 Newman Center. 712 W Lombard 
Street 

2* N.lsson House. 826 N Eutaw Street 
(off campus) 

29 Parsons Residence Hall for Women. 
622 W Lombard Street 

30 Pratt Street Garage and Athletic Fa 
cility. 646 W Pratt Street 



33 



34 



<5 



31 Redwood Hall. 721 W Redwood 
Street 

Division of Alcoholism and Drug 
Abuse offices, clinical areas 

32. School of Nursing Building 655 W 
Lombard Street 

Nursing school classrooms, offices 
School of Social Work and Admin 
istration Building. 525 W Redwood 
Street 

Office of the chancellor School of 
Social Work and Community Plan- 
ning classrooms, offices 
State Medical Examiner's Building. 
Ill Penn Street 

Stroke Center. 412 W Redwood 
Street (off campus) 

36 Temporary Academic Building. 601 
Rear W Lombard Street 

School of Social Work and Com- 
munity Planning classrooms, offices 

37 Tuerk House. 106 N Greene Street 
(off campus) 

Residential facility for alcoholism 
programs of the University of Mary- 
land Hospital. (Also Alpha and Nils- 
son Houses ) 

38 University College. 520 W Lom- 
bard Street 

Offers degree and non degree edu 
cational programs Juvenile Law 
Clinic 

39 University Garage. 701 W Red- 
wood Street 

Helistop 

University of Maryland Hospital. 22 
S Greene Street 

Western Health Clinic. 700 W 
Lombard Street 

Whitehurst Hall. 624 W Lombard 
Street 

Graduate School office, nursing, 
pharmacy, social work and commu- 
nity planning offices, classrooms 



40 



80 



Index 

Academic policies 20 

Accelerated Professional Training Program 38 

Administrative Officers 65 

Admission/Application: 

Dental program 18 

Dental hygiene program 46 

Graduate program 52 

Postgraduate programs 52 

With advanced standing 19 

Alumni Association 76 

Awards: 

Dental students 61 

Dental hygiene students 61 

Baltimore Union 58 

Calendar 5 

Campus Map 80 

Combined degree programs: 

Undergraduate 20 

Graduate 52 

Continuing Education Program 55 

Course descriptions: 

Accelerated professional training 39 

Dental program 27 

Dental hygiene program 47 

Postgraduate programs 53 

Curriculum: 

Dental 25 

Dental hygiene 43 

Dental Admissions Test 18 

Dental Hygiene Admissions Test 46 

Departments of instruction 27 

Disclosure of information policy 12 

Dress Code 23 

Employment opportunities: 

Dental 24 

Dental hygiene 43 

Expenses: 

Dental students 23 

Dental hygiene students 47 

Faculty and staff 66 

Financial Aid: 

Dental 14 

Dental hygiene 15 

Graduate programs 52 

Graduation requirements: 

Dental program 22 

Dental hygiene program 47 

Diploma application 12 

Early graduation 22 

Health requirements 12 

Housing 58 

Insurance: 

Health 12 

Professional liability: 

Dental 12 

Dental hygiene 12 

Lecture funds 5 

Library 4 

Minimester 22 

Museum 4 

Organizations 58 

Publications 58 

Registrations 7 

Resident status 7 

Specially Tailored Educational Program 21 

Student Judicial Policy 24 

Student Health Service 58 

Transcripts 11 

Tuition 8 

Withdrawal 10 

81 



At the Dedication of Hayden-Harris Hall 
on March 5, 1971 

"Within these stones and bricks, 
healing is to be administered, and no 
less important, human relationships 
developed between teachers and 
students and between students and 
patients. If ever patients are regarded 
as clinical material, this building will 
have been degraded and its use 
corrupted. We must never forget that 
the word patient comes from the Latin 
root which means to suffer. Clinical 
material does not suffer. Human beings 
do." 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Regents 

University of Maryland 



"The University is the rear guard and 
the advance agent of society. It lives in 
the past, the present, and the future. It 
is the storehouse of knowledge; it 
draws upon this depository to throw 
light upon the present; it prepares 
people to live and make a living in the 
world of today; and it should take the 
lead in expanding the intellectual 
horizons and the scientific frontiers, 
thus helping mankind to go forward, 
always toward the promise of a better 
tomorrow. " 

From the inaugural address of 
Dr. Wilson A. Elkins 
President, University of Maryland 
1955-1978 



82 



)ENiAL ;>;. \:\ iv 



:>f M/ 



/'ti. um 



984 






' 



DENTAL SCHOOL BULLETIN 
1982-1984 



Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Dental School 
University of Maryland at Baltimore 



"Within these stones and bricks, healing is to 
be administered, and no less important, human 
relationships developed between teachers and 
students and between students and patients. If 
ever patients are regarded as clinical material, 
this building will have been degraded and its 
use corrupted. We must never forget that the 
word patient comes from the Latin root which 
means to suffer. Clinical material does not suf- 
fer. Human beings do. ' ' 

From the address of 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Regents 

University of Maryland 

Dedication of Hayden-Harris Hall 

March 5, 1971 






CONTENTS 



General Information 1 

Matriculation Policies and Procedures 

scholarship and Loan Funds 9 
\ The Dental Program 13 
I ^"he Dental Hygiene Program 31 

\dvanced Education Programs 39 

Student Life 42 
■Administration 47 
■Faculty Emeriti 47 

Mumni Association 49 
■Index 51 
jf Campus Map 52 



*■ 



I 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Statement of Philosophy 

As the art and science of dentistry have 
evolved since its origin in 1840, the dental pro- 
fession has demonstrated a variety of achieve- 
ments. Technical excellence in clinical proce- 
dures has been augmented by an improved 
understanding of human biology. 

The Dental School's programs focus on the 
three basic aims of the academic community— 
teaching, research and service. As a university 
discipline, dental education must meet and sur- 
pass its previous accomplishments to ensure the 
continued advancement of dentistry. While the 
process of education must remain anchored 
firmly to time-tested principles, it must also 
continually extend itself to uncover hidden 
truths within these same principles and thereby 
contribute to man's progress toward better un- 
derstanding and control of his environment. 

The School 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Den- 
tal School, University of Maryland at Baltimore 
has the distinction of being the oldest dental 
college in the world. Formal education to pre- 
pare students for the practice of dentistry origi- 
nated in 1840 with the establishment of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. The char- 
tering of the school by the General Assembly 
of Maryland on February 1 , 1 840 represented 
the culmination of the efforts of Dr. Horace H. 
Hayden and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, two dental 
practitioners who recognized the need for sys- 
tematic formal education as the foundation for 
a scientific and serviceable dental profession. 
Together they played a major role in establish- 
ing and promoting formal dental education, and 
in the development of dentistry as a profession. 
Convinced that support for a formal course in 
dental education would not come from within 
medical schools, Dr. Hayden undertook the es- 
tablishment of an independent dental college. 




Dr. Harris, an energetic and ambitious young 
man who had come to Baltimore in 1830 to 
study under Dr. Hayden, was active in the ef- 
fort to found the College, relieving Hayden 
(who was seventy at the time) of many of the 
details involved in such an endeavor. 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
served as a prototype for dental schools gradu- 
ally established in other American cities and 
originated the pattern of modern dental educa- 
tion, with equal emphasis on sound knowledge 
of general medicine and development of the 
skills of dentistry. Through its contributions to 
dental and medical progress and through the 
prominent role of its faculty and graduates in 
the development of the profession, the Balti- 



more College of Dental Surgery has exerted a 
remarkable influence on professional dentistry. 

The present dental school evolved through a 
series of consolidations involving the Maryland 
Dental College, which merged with the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery in 1878; the 
Dental Department of the University of Mary- 
land, founded in 1882; and the Dental Depart- 
ment of the Baltimore Medical College, which 
merged with the University of Maryland Dental 
Department in 1913. The final consolidation 
took place in 1923, when the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery and the University of 
Maryland Dental School were combined to cre- 
ate a distinct department of the University un- 
der state supervision and control. 

In 1970 the Dental School moved into 
Hay den-Harris Hall, a new five-story building 
with modern equipment and treatment facilities. 
The Dental School today offers one of the fin- 
est programs of dental education in the world. 
Continuing efforts are made to provide educa- 
tional and training experiences consistent with 
evolving concepts and advances in the delivery 
of dental health care. 

In addition to the D.D.S. program, the 
School offers a baccalaureate degree program 
in dental hygiene designed to prepare students 
for careers in dental hygiene practice, teaching 
and other areas related to this important dental 
auxiliary field. Graduate programs leading to a 
master's or doctoral degree in anatomy, bio- 
chemistry, microbiology, oral pathology and 
physiology are also offered. A large number of 
faculty members are actively engaged in re- 
search; research opportunities are available to 
dental students as well as to graduate and post- 
graduate students. 

Postgraduate training is offered in the 
specialty areas of endodontics, oral and maxil- 
lofacial surgery, oral pathology, orthodontics, 
pedodontics, periodontics and prosthodontics. 
A program leading to the degree Master of 
Science in Oral Biology is available to candi- 
dates seeking certificates of advanced education 
in the dental specialties. Also offered are a pro- 
gram in general dentistry providing advanced 
training in clinical dentistry and applied basic 
sciences for the generalist, and a general prac- 
tice residency program through the Dental 
School and the University of Maryland Hospi- 
tal. 

The School's continuing education program 
provides opportunities for dental and dental 
auxiliary practitioners to update their knowl- 
edge and skills. Approximately fifty courses are 
conducted annually in special facilities designed 
for the program. 



After more than 140 years of service to den- 
tal education, the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of Mary- 
land at Baltimore continues to fulfill, through 
its graduates, the aspirations of its founders to 
provide scientifically trained professionals to 
serve the oral health care needs of society. 



The Campus 

The Dental School is located on the campus of 
the University of Maryland at Baltimore in the 
heart of metropolitan Baltimore. Other major 
units of this campus are the Graduate School, 
Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, Phar- 
macy, Social Work and Community Planning, 
and the University of Maryland Hospital. These 
professional schools and their service programs 
contribute to the health and welfare of the citi- 
zens of Maryland. The support and utilization 
of the University's services by community resi- 
dents in turn represent a vital resource for the 
University. 



The City 

Statistically, Baltimore is the largest city in 
Maryland, the ninth most populous in the na- 
tion, and site of the country's fourth largest 
foreign commerce seaport. The Baltimore re- 
gion has much to offer the student, from the 
sophistication and culture of a large, metropoli- 
tan city, to the beauty and leisure of the water- 
front and rural areas that surround it. Having 
been the location of many significant events in 
the nation's history, including the writing of 
the national anthem, Baltimore maintains a 
strong feeling for the past as typified by the 
many charming neighborhoods of restored 
houses and abundance of historic buildings. 

And yet, Baltimore has become increasingly 
forward-thinking and is making outstanding 
progress in the revitalization and rebirth of its 
downtown area. A prime example is Charles 
Center, one of the early models for urban 
planning in the country, which incorporates a 
theater, hotel, shops, and series of plazas and 
elevated walkways that are used as settings for 
frequent fairs, concerts, art shows and festivals 
Even closer to campus, one of the most excit- 
ing renovated places is the inner harbor. This 
busy port area includes office buildings, apart- 
ments, schools, parks, recreational facilities — 
in all, an entirely new living and working 
complex. 




Downtown Baltimore and Inner Harbor with Dental School circled. 



As a cultural center, Baltimore has offerings 
to please the most discriminating. It possesses 
an excellent symphony, a professional opera 
company, many professional and semiprofes- 
sional theaters, the Peabody Conservatory of 
Music, outstanding museums, excellent li- 
braries, and historical and scientific societies, 
the newest of which are the Maryland Academy 
of Sciences Center that opened in the inner har- 
bor area in 1976 and the National Aquarium 
which opened in 1981. 

Sports fans, too, have a lot to savor in Balti- 
more thanks to the wide range of professional 
; and collegiate teams. The city is famous, of 
! course, for the Orioles and the Colts, but both 
spectators and participants will also find excel- 
lent hockey, soccer, lacrosse, basketball, horse- 
racing, golf and tennis close at hand. Also 
nearby is the Chesapeake Bay, offering numer- 
ous water sports and the seafood for which Bal- 
timore is famous. 

The Health Sciences Library 

The Health Sciences Library of the University 
of Maryland serves the professional schools of 



Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, So- 
cial Work and Community Planning, the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Hospital, the Graduate 
School, and other affiliated institutions. Cur- 
rently the Library has over 240,000 volumes 
and over 3,100 periodical subscriptions. The 
collection size ranks the Library among the fif- 
teen largest health sciences libraries in the 
United States. 

The Health Sciences Library provides Com- 
puterized Reference and Bibliographic Services 
(CRABS), which is an automated literature re- 
trieval system. Using the Information Specialist 
as an intermediary, the patron is able to com- 
pile bibliographic and factual information in a 
matter of minutes. The Library has access to 
over thirty computerized data bases in the sci- 
ences and social sciences including MEDLINE, 
PSYCHINFO, ERIC, TOXLINE, SOCIAL 
SCI-SEARCH and SCI-SEARCH. 

The Library is open 8:00 a.m.- 10:00 p.m. 
(Monday-Friday), 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. (Satur- 
day), and 12:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. (Sunday). Spe- 
cial holiday and summer hours are posted. Bor- 
rowers must show a UMAB ID badge validated 
for the current year. 



Museum of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery 

The Museum of the Baltimore College of Den- 
tal Surgery is located in the Reading Room of 
the Independent Learning Center on the ground 
floor of Hay den-Harris Hall. Some special dis- 
plays are appropriately located in other areas of 
the building. 

Because of its heritage from the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery and the importance 
of Baltimore in the development of professional 
dentistry, the Museum has developed a large 
and valuable collection of objects and speci- 
mens of historical and professional interest. 
Several items of national and international in- 
terest, such as George Washington's ivory and 
gold dentures, are on loan to the Smithsonian 
Institution in Washington, D.C., where they 
may be shared with a larger audience. 

Items currently on display in the Museum in- 
clude dental chairs and operatories from various 
periods of dental history, instrument cabinets, 
early instruments, dentures representing the 
various stages through which the art of dental 
prosthesis progressed, the Guerini cabinet con- 
taining replicas of dental appliances from the 
most ancient times through the 18th Century, 
and portraits of leaders in the development of 
professional dentistry. 

The Museum and the Independent Learning 
Center are open throughout the year Monday 
through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
with extended hours evenings and Saturdays 
during the regular academic year. Group tours 
are welcome, but arrangements must be made 
in advance by calling (301) 528-7944. 

Special Lecture Funds 

The Grayson W. Gaver Memorial Lecture. 
Through the generosity of both his family and 
the School alumni, an endowed lectureship was 
established in memory of the late Dr. Grayson 
W. Gaver, an outstanding leader in the field of 
prosthodontics and a distinguished member of 
the faculty for many years. The Gaver Lecture 
is presented annually as part of Student-Faculty 
Day activities. 

The William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell Lec- 
ture. In 1965 two faithful alumni, Drs. William 
B. and Elizabeth S. Powell, presented the 
School with a generous contribution for the 
purpose of instituting special lectures for the 
benefit of the student body and faculty. The 
first lecture in the series was presented in 
April, 1966. These lectures provide a means of 
broadening the total academic program. 

The Stephen E. and Jeffrey A. K lei man Lec- 



tures in Dentistry and Medicine. As a tribute to j 
the selection of health profession careers by his 
sons, Dr. Bernard S. Kleiman established this 
annual lecture program at the University of 
Maryland Dental School and School of Medi- 
cine. For these lectures, which are scheduled to 
alternate annually between the schools, distin- 
guished individuals will be invited to lecture on 
topics pertinent and applicable to practicing 
dentists or physicians. 

In addition to these annual lectures, there are 
three special lectures which are presented on a 
rotating basis once every three years as part of 
the Commencement/ Alumni Week activities: 
The John E. Fogarty Memorial Lecture, spon- 
sored by the Rhode Island Section of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery Alumni Asso- 
ciation; The Hayden-Harris Memorial Lecture, 
sponsored by the Alumni Association; and The 
J. Ben Robinson Memorial Lecture, sponsored 
by the Maryland Section of the American Col- 
lege of Dentists. 

1982-1983 Academic Calendar 

Following is the academic calendar for 1982- 
83. This schedule is subject to change, and is 
provided only for general information concern- 
ing the length of terms and holidays. 



August 30-31 


Freshman orientation 


September 1 


First semester begins 


September 6 


Labor Day (school closed) 


November 25-26 


Tfianksgiving recess 


December 16 


First semester ends 


December 17-23 


Exam week 


December 24-31 


Christmas recess 


January 3-21 


Minimester 


January 14 


Martin Luther King 's 
Birthday (school closed) 


January 24 


Second semester begins 


March 14-18 


Spring Vacation 


May 13 


Second semester ends 


May 16-20 


Exam week 


May 20 


Graduation 



MATRICULATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 



Registration Procedures 

To attend classes students are required to regis- 
ter each term in accordance with current regis- 
tration procedures. Fees are due and payable on 
the dates specified for registration. Registration 
is not completed until all financial obligations 
are satisfied. Students who do not complete 
their registration will not be permitted to attend 
classes. A fee will be charged for late registra- 
tion. 

Although the University regularly mails bills 
to advance-registered students, it cannot assume 
responsibility for their receipt. If any student 
does not receive a bill prior to the beginning of 
a semester in which he has advance registered, 
it is the student's responsibility to contact the 
Office of the Registrar or Office of the Cashier, 
Howard Hall, during normal business hours. 

Any enrolled student may request at registra- 
tion the postponement of payment of one-half 
of the tuition rate for thirty (30) days; all other 
fees are due and payable. For this service a 
charge of $2.00 will be made. 

If a satisfactory settlement or agreement for 
settlement is not made with the Business Office 
within ten days after a payment is due, the stu- 
dent is automatically prohibited from attending 
classes and will forfeit the other privileges of 
the Dental School. 

All checks and money orders should be made 
payable to the University of Maryland for the 
exact amount of the actual bill. 

No diploma, certificate or transcript of record 
will be issued to a student who has not made 
satisfactory settlement of his University ac- 
count. 

Determination of In-State Status 

An initial determination of in-state status for 
admission, tuition and charge-differential pur- 
poses will be made by the University at the 
time a student's application for admission is 




under consideration. The determination made at 
that time, and any determination made there- 
after shall prevail in each semester until the 
determination is successfully challenged. 

Students classified as in-state for admission, 
tuition and charge-differential purposes are re- 
sponsible for notifying the Office of Admis- 
sions, in writing, within fifteen (15) days of 
any change in their circumstances which might 
in any way affect their classification at UMAB. 

The determination of in-state status for ad- 
mission, tuition and charge-differential pur- 
poses is the responsibility of the Office of Ad- 
missions and Registrations. Copies of the 
University's policy are available in the Admis- 
sions Office and in each dean's office. 



1982-83 Tuition and Fees 



Dental Program 

Matriculation (New Students) 
Tuition (Fixed Charges) 

In-State 

Out-of-State 
Instructional Resources Fee 
Student Activities Fee 
Student Health Fee 
Hospitalization Insurance** 

One Person 

Two Persons 

Family 
Supporting Facilities Fee 
Student Liability Insurance 
Dormitory Fee 

(Double Occupancy) 
Graduation Fee (Seniors) 



Fall 


Spring 


Total 


B 20.00 


$ - 


$ 20.00 


1829.00 


1829.00 


3658.00 


3593.00 


3593.00 


7186.00 


23.00 


23.00 


46.00 


16.50 


16.50 


33.00 


11.00 


11.00 


22.00 


111.12 


111.12 


222.24* 


217.32 


217.32 


434.64* 


289.92 


289.92 


579.84* 


44.00 


44.00 


88.00 


15.00 


— 


15.00 


750.00 


750.00 


1500.00 


— 


15.00 


15.00 



* 198 1-82 Fees 

^Hospitalization Insurance— University's program or equivalent insurance coverage required of 
all dental students in addition to the Student Health Fee. 



Dental Hygiene Program 

Matriculation (New Students) 
Tuition (Fixed Charges) 

In-State 

Out-of-State 
Instructional Resources Fee 
Student Activities Fee 
Student Health Fee 
Hospitalization Insurance** 

One Person 

Two Persons 

Family 
Supporting Facilities Fee 
Student Liability Insurance 
Dormitory Fee (Double Occupancy) 
Graduation Fee (Seniors) 



Fall 


Spring 


Total 


5 15.00 


$ - 


$ 15.00 


478.50 


478.50 


957.00 


1559.50 


1559.50 


3119.00 


18.00 


18.00 


36.00 


16.50 


16.50 


33.00 


11.00 


11.00 


22.00 


111.12 


111.12 


222.24* 


217.32 


217.32 


434.64* 


289.92 


289.92 


579.84* 


44.00 


44.00 


88.00 


10.50 


— 


10.50 


750.00 


750.00 


1500.00 


— 


15.00 


15.00 



* 198 1-82 Fees 
^Hospitalization Insurance— University's program or equivalent insurance coverage required of 
all full-time dental hygiene students in addition to the Student Health Fee. 



Explanation of Fees 

The Application and/or Matriculation Fee 

Dartially defrays the cost of processing applica- 
tions for admission and enrollment data in the 
Drofessional schools. These are not refundable. 
The Application Fee will be applied against the 
Matriculation Fee for accepted students. 

The Instructional Resources Fee is 

:harged to provide supplies, materials, equip- 
ment and to defray other costs directly asso- 
rted with the instructional program. 

The Student Activities Fee is used to 
meet the costs for various student activities, 
student publications and cultural programs. In 
each of the schools that has a Student Activities 
Fee, the Student Government Association, in 
cooperation with the dean's office of the 
school, recommends expenditure of the fee col- 
lected. 

The Student Health Fee is charged to 
help defray the cost of providing a Campus 
Health Service. This service includes routine 
examinations and emergency care. Acceptable 
medical insurance is required in addition to the 
Student Health Fee. 

Health Insurance is required of all full- 
time students. A brief outline of the Student 
Health Insurance Program is furnished each 
student. Students with equivalent insurance 
coverage must provide proof of such coverage 
at the time of registration and obtain a Health 
Insurance Waiver. 

The Supporting Facilities Fee is used for 
expansion of various campus facilities that are 
not funded or are funded only in part from 
other sources. 



Student Liability Fee (malpractice) is 
charged all professional school students. 

The Graduation Fee is charged to help de- 
fray costs involved with graduation and com- 
mencement. 

Fees for Auditors are the same as those 
charged for courses taken for credit at both the 
undergraduate and graduate level. Audited 
credit hours will be added to a student's total 
credit enrollment to determine whether or not a 
student is full-time or part-time for tuition and 
fee assessment purposes. 

Special students are assessed tuition and fees 
in accordance with the schedule for the compa- 
rable undergraduate, graduate or first profes- 
sional classification. 



• A service charge is assessed for dishonored 
checks and is payable for each check which is 
returned unpaid by the drawee bank on initial 
presentation because of insufficient funds, pay- 
ment stopped, postdating, drawn against uncol- 
lected items, etc. 

For checks up to $50.00 $ 5.00 

For checks from $50.01 to $100.00 . .$10.00 
For checks over $100.00 $20.00 

• A late registration fee is charged to defray 
the cost of the special handling involved for 
those who do not complete their registration on 
the prescribed days. 

• No degree will be conferred, nor any di- 
ploma, certificate, or transcript of record issued 
to a student who has not made satisfactory set- 
tlement of his account. 

• The University reserves the right to make 
such changes in fees and other charges as may 
be necessary. 

Withdrawal and Refund of Fees 

Students desiring to leave the School at any 
time during the academic year are required to 
file with the Dean a letter of resignation. In ad- 
dition, an Application for Withdrawal Form 
bearing the proper signatures must be filed with 
the Office of the Registrar. The student must 
satisfy the authorities that he has no outstand- 
ing obligations to the School and return his stu- 
dent identification card. 

If the above procedures are not completed, 
the student will not be entitled to honorable 
dismissal and will forfeit the right to any re- 
funds to which he would otherwise be entitled. 
The date used in computing refunds is the date 
the application for withdrawal is signed by the 
Dean. 

Refunds. Students officially withdrawing 
from the School will be credited for all aca- 
demic fees charged to them less the Matricula- 
tion Fee, in accordance with the following 
schedule for the date instruction begins: 
Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 
Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks 

Official University Records 

Transcript of Record. Students and alumni 
may secure transcripts of their UMAB record 
from the Registrar's Office. There is a tran- 
script charge of $2.00 per copy. Checks should 



be made payable to the University of Maryland. 
There is no charge for issuance of transcripts 
between University of Maryland campuses. A 
request for transcripts must be made in writing 
and should be made at least two (2) weeks in 
advance of the date when the records are actu- 
ally needed. Transcripts are issued in turn as 
requests are received. 

No transcript will be furnished any student or 
alumnus whose financial obligations to the Uni- 
versity have not been satisfied. 

Disclosure of Student Information. In 

accordance with "The Family Education Rights 
and Privacy Acts of 1974" (PL 93-380), popu- 
larly referred to as the "Buckley Amendment," 
disclosure of student information, including fi- 
nancial and academic, is restricted. Release to 
anyone other than the student requires a written 
waiver from the student. A full policy state- 
ment may be found in the current UMAB cam- 
pus information guide issued to all incoming 
students. 



Diploma Application 

Degree requirements vary according to the 
UMAB school program in which a student is 
registered. However, each degree candidate 
must file a formal application for diploma with 
the Office of the Registrar at the beginning of 
the term in which the student expects to gradu- 
ate. This must be done by the end of the third 
week of the semester or the second week of the 
summer session. 

A student who does not graduate on the orig- 
inally expected date must reapply for gradua- 
tion by the appropriate deadline. 

Student Health Requirements 

All students are required to have Blue Cross 
hospitalization insurance or its equivalent. A 
special Blue Cross/Blue Shield student policy is 
available to all students enrolling in the School. 
Detailed information regarding the provisions 
of the student policy may be obtained from the 
Campus Health Office. At the time of registra- 
tion each student must either purchase the stu- 
dent Blue Cross/Blue Shield coverage or pro- 
duce certified proof of equivalent coverage. 
Upon arrival on campus, students are re- 
quired to have a tuberculin skin test as part of 
the registration process. Students with a nega- 
tive tuberculin skin test will be retested each 
year upon returning to school. For students 
who convert from a negative to positive skin 



test, an x-ray of the chest will be obtained at 
intervals and suppressive medication may be 
recommended. 

In addition to a tuberculin skin test, each stu 
dent is required to undergo a physical examina 
tion, including a urinalysis. Any glasses nor- 
mally worn or used for reading should be in the 
student's possession at the time of the examina 
tion, whether it is performed by a private or a 
Campus Health Service physician. 

Student Professional Insurance 

It is the policy of the Dental School that dental 
and dental hygiene students in each year of the 
program be required to carry professional liabil 
ity insurance as a condition for enrollment. 
This policy also applies to all Advanced Spe- 
cialty Education students. Undergraduate stu- 
dents, both dental and dental hygiene, will ob- 
tain insurance coverage through a group 
program for a reasonable premium. This plan, 
payable at enrollment each year, can also pro- 
vide equipment coverage for an additional nom 
inal premium. Information regarding profes- 
sional coverage for undergraduate students is 
available through the Dental School's Office of 
Student Affairs or the Associate Dean for Clini 
cal Affairs. 



S 




s 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 



)ental Students 

Iniversity Grants. In an attempt to meet the 
ver increasing needs of students, the Maryland 
jgislature each year allocates to the University 
ands earmarked for student assistance. As a 
isult, university grants are available to disad- 
antaged students who demonstrate a financial 
eed. Awards are made on an individual basis 
Iter careful review of the student's current fi- 
nancial situation. 

Jealth Professions Student Loans. Under 
ie Federal Health Professions Program, loans 
•e made available to qualified students. Loans 
re reviewed on an annual basis and vary in 
hnount depending on the student's financial 
jed. Students are not assessed interest pre- 
iums until they graduate and begin repay- 
ent. Repayment begins one year after gradua- 
)n and must be completed within ten years 
om that time. The current interest rate is 9 
,^rcent per annum. 

ink Loans. Through the Maryland Higher 
iucation Loan Corporation and the United 
udent Aid Fund, loan programs which permit 
idents to borrow money from their home 
wn banks have been established. Graduate 
d professional students may borrow up to 
,000 per year to assist in meeting their edu- 
tional expenses. Borrowers begin repayment 

I months after graduation or withdrawal from 
lool. At the present time, simple interest is 
arged at the rate of 9 percent. Further details 
ly be secured from the UMAB Office of Stu- 
nt Aid. 

»e Edward S. Gaylord Educational En- 
bwment Fund. Under a provision of the 

II of the late Dr. Edward S. Gaylord of New 
iven, Connecticut, an amount approximating 
|6,000, the proceeds of which are to be de- 
ted to aiding worthy students in securing a 



dental education, was bequeathed to the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore. 

Lawrence A. Haskins Memorial Student 
Loan Fund. This fund, honoring the memory 
of Dr. Haskins, Class of 1970, provides loans 
to deserving students in the Dental School, 
University of Maryland at Baltimore. Loans 
made from the fund shall bear 7 percent inter- 
est per annum to accrue with the start of the re- 
payment period which shall last no longer than 
ten years. The repayment period shall begin 
one year after the completion of studies. 

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation. During 
World War II the Foundation recognized the 
burden that the accelerated course imposed 
upon many dental students who, under normal 
circumstances, would earn money for their edu- 
cation by employment during the summer vaca- 
tion. The Foundation granted to this School a 
fund to provide rotating loans to deserving den- 
tal students. 

The Albert A. Harrington Fund. This fund 
was established in 1954 by the New Jersey 
Alumni Association in memory of Dr. Albert 
A. Harrington, a member of the Class of 1910. 
The fund is a source of valuable help in aiding 
students to solve temporary financial problems. 

The Dr. Joseph Anthony Pennino Memo- 
rial Scholarship Fund. Under the provision 
of the will of the late Elizabeth Pennino, this 
endowed scholarship fund was established as a 
memorial to Dr. Joseph Anthony Pennino, 
Class of 1928, to provide scholarships to de- 
serving students in the D.D.S. program of the 
Dental School. 

The Student Dental Association— Alumni 
Fund. This fund, created in 1960, was es- 
tablished for the purpose of aiding any student 
who may be in need of an emergency loan. 




The Russell Gigliotti Memorial Student 
Loan Fund. This fund is intended to provide 
financial assistance primarily but not exclu- 
sively to students in the preclinical years, for 
which costs are significantly higher because of 
required instrument and material purchases. 
Any undergraduate dental student who qualifies 
for financial aid, and who is unable to secure 
other University financial assistance, is eligible 
to apply. 

A maximum of $500 annually will be loaned 
to one student; no student may receive more 
than two loans during the period of training. 
Simple interest at the rate of 5 percent per an- 
num will be charged, commencing three 
months after graduation. Principal plus interest 
must be repaid within twenty-seven months fol- 
lowing graduation. 

The fund was established in 1977 in memory 
of Dr. Russell Gigliotti, an alumnus and dedi- 
cated member of the faculty for more than 
thirty years. 

Health Education Assistance Loan. Dental 
students who are U.S. citizens and are enrolled 
full time in the dental program may borrow up 
to $15,000 per year to a cumulative maximum 
of $60,000. 

The loans are made by commercial lenders. 
Students may not borrow from another guaran- 
teed student loan program (such as the Mary- 
land Higher Education Loan) during the same 
academic year to be covered by the Health Ed- 
ucation Loan. 



10 



There is no federal interest subsidy under thi 
program. Interest may be paid on an ongoing 
basis or accrued until repayment begins. If in- 
terest is accrued, it will be compounded semi- 
annually and added to the loan principal when 
repayment begins. An insurance premium, not 
to exceed 2 percent per annum, will be charge 
at the time an individual loan is processed 



: 



)] 



Sa 



The International College of Dentists 
Student Loan Fund. In 1962 the Interna- 
tional College of Dentists established a fund tcfln 
assist deserving senior students in need of fi- 
nancial aid. 



Gillette Hayden Memorial Foundation 
Student Loan Program. This loan is availaj 
ble to promising women students in their jun- 
ior, senior or graduate years of dental school. 
At this time the amount of each loan is not to 
exceed $1,000, repayable one year and one 
month after the date of graduation at a per an 
num interest of 1 percent. There is no formal 
application form; requirements are a transcript 
of the applicant's academic record, a letter of 
recommendation from the Dean, a character 
reference from a reputable person in the appli 
cant's home town, and the name and address 
the nearest relative. All inquiries should be adit, 
dressed to the Gillette Hayden Memorial Fouij F 
dation, Suite 204, 33 Ponce de Leon Avenue. | i| 
N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30308. 



lohn Carr Emergency Loan Fund. This en- 
dowed emergency student loan fund was es- 
ablished in memory of Dr. John Carr, a dedi- 
cated member of the Dental School faculty, and 
s available to dental students who have an 
emergency need during their school years. Re- 
>ayment of the loan is not scheduled until after 
graduation. 

Dental Hygiene Students 

financial aid, in the form of scholarships, 
grants and loans, is awarded to students based 
lpon apparent academic ability and financial 
teed. Recipients of financial aid are expected 
o make satisfactory progress toward attainment 
*f a degree and to abide by all academic and 
ion-academic regulations of the University. In 
he case of new students, applicants must have 
>een accepted for admission to the University 
•efore the financial aid application can be re- 
iewed. 

Requests for information about and applica- 
ions for financial aid for predental hygiene stu- 
dents should be addressed to the Student Aid 
)ffice at the campus to which the student is 
dmitted. Dental hygiene students (junior and 
^mor standing) should write to the Student Aid 

> n[ ()ffice, University of Maryland at Baltimore, 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

2eB ; Because each campus has its own filing dead- 

D ine, applicants should contact the Financial 
vid Office on the appropriate campus early in 
le spring semester to obtain a financial aid ap- 
lication and learn the filing deadline. Finan- 
ial aid is awarded for only one academic year; 

\k new application must be filed to apply for aid 
i a succeeding year. 

Iniversity Grants. Dental hygiene students 
re eligible for university grants which are de- 
cribed on page 9. 

General State Tuition Scholarships. The 

i) Jeneral Assembly of Maryland provides a 
i umber of limited tuition scholarships to stu- 
dents entering college for the first time. The 
bholarships may be used in any approved insti- 
ltion of higher education within the State. At 
le University of Maryland, they cover the 
ferns listed as fixed charges. Awards are made 
y the State Scholarship Board based upon fi- 
r i ancial need and the results of a competitive 
pi pcami nation, usually given during the month of 
^jJovember. For additional information and ap- 
lications, contact high school guidance coun- 
dors or the Maryland State Scholarship Board, 
100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 
1218. 



American Dentai Hygienists' Association 
Scholarship and Loan Program. The 

American Dental Hygienists' Association ad- 
ministers two scholarship programs: the Certifi- 
cate Scholarship Program for students entering 
the final year of a dental hygiene curriculum 
and the Post Dental Hygiene Scholarship Pro- 
gram for certificate dental hygienists who will 
be enrolled in a program leading to a baccalau- 
reate degree. Dental hygiene students who will 
be enrolled or accepted for full-time enrollment 
may also be considered for American Dental 
Hygienists' Association Loans which range 
from $500 to $1,000 annually. Repayment be- 
gins ten months after graduation with 7.5 per- 
cent interest on the amount of the loan out- 
standing. For further information about these 
scholarships, write directly to the American 
Dental Hygienists' Association, 211 East Chi- 
cago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611. 

In addition, local chapters of the ADHA may 
offer scholarships and/or loans. For informa- 
tion, contact the JADHA advisor on the dental 
hygiene faculty. 

National Direct Student Loans. The Uni- 
versity receives an annual National Direct Stu- 
dent Loan appropriation from the federal gov- 
ernment that is used as part of the School's 
loan fund. National Direct Student Loan alloca- 
tions are based on the same considerations as 




11 




/ 



\ 



other financial aid awards. Repayment of a 
NDSL begins one year after the borrower 
ceases to be a full-time student. The loan is re- 
paid at a minimum rate of $45 per quarter; re- 
payment must be completed within ten years. 
No interest is charged on the loan until the stu- 
dent graduates. After that date, interest accrues 
at the rate of 5 percent per annum. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants. Under provisions established by the 
federal government, limited grants are available 
to encourage students of exceptional financial 
need to continue their postsecondary school ed- 
ucation. A recipient must be a United States 
citizen enrolled as a full-time undergraduate. 
Applications are available at most undergradu- 
ate financial aid offices. 

Bank Loans. Most states have established fed- 
eral guaranteed programs which permit students 
to borrow money from a home town bank. In 
most states undergraduates in good standing 
may borrow up to $2,500 per year to assist in 
meeting their educational expenses. Borrowers 
begin repayment ten months after graduation or 
withdrawal from school. At the present time, 
simple interest is charged at the rate of 9 per- 
cent. Further details concerning the Maryland 
program or programs in other states may be se- 
cured from the Student Financial Aid Office or 
a local bank. 



12 






Maryland Dental Hygienists' Association 
Loans. The Maryland Dental Hygienists' As- 
sociation administers a loan program for quali- 
fied and needy senior dental hygiene students. 
Information is distributed to junior students by 
the Department of Dental Hygiene during the 
spring semester. 

The Patricia C. Stearns Scholarship. The 

Department of Dental Hygiene awards the 
Patricia C. Stearns Scholarship to a student en- 
tering the senior year who has demonstrated ac 
ademic excellence; willingness to serve the 
class, school, and community; dedication to th< 
profession; and high standards of professional 
conduct. 

John Carr Emergency Loan Fund. This eri 
dowed emergency student loan fund was es- 
tablished in memory of Dr. John Carr and is 
available to dental hygiene students who have 
an emergency need during their school years. 
Repayment of the loan is not scheduled until 
after graduation. 

Work-Study Program. The University has 
funds available for students who demonstrate 
need for financial aid and are able to participat 
in a work-study program. Students may work £ 
maximum of 20 hours per week in various de 
partments on the UMAB campus, and typically 
earn $1,000 to $1,200 per year. 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



Requirements for Admission 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Den- 
tal School, University of Maryland at Baltimore 
subscribes to a policy of equal educational op- 
portunity for men and women of all races, 
creeds and ethnic origins. The Dental School, 
in seeking to broaden the racial and ethnic bal- 
ance of its enrollment, encourages minority stu- 
dent applications. It is the objective of the Den- 
tal School to enroll students with diversified 
backgrounds in order to make the educational 
experience more meaningful for each individual 
as well as to provide dental health practitioners 
to all segments of the community. 

Applicants for admission to the dental pro- 
gram must have successfully completed at least 
three academic years in an accredited college of 
arts and sciences. The college course must in- 
clude at least a year's credit in english (6), in 
biology (8), in physics (8), in general or inor- 
ganic chemistry (8), and in organic chemistry 
(8). All required science courses shall include 
both classroom and laboratory instruction. In 
addition to the 90 semester hours of credit re- 
quired (exclusive of physical education and 
military science), other courses in the humani- 
ties and the biological and social sciences are 
desirable. No more than 60 of the minimum re- 
quired credits will be accepted from a junior 
college; these credits must have been validated 
by an accredited college of arts and sciences. 
By the ruling of the Faculty Council, all admis- 
sion requirements must be completed by June 
30 prior to the desired date of admission. 

All applicants must also present favorable 
recommendations from their respective preden- 
tal committee or, if no such committee is avail- 
able, from one instructor each in the Depart- 
ments of Biology and Chemistry. In all other 
respects, applicants must give every promise of 
becoming successful students and dentists of 
high standing. Applicants will not be admitted 
with unabsolved conditions or unabsolved fail- 
ures. 



Maryland residents should have science and 
cumulative grade point average (GPA) values 
of 2.6 or higher to be competitive for admis- 
sion; nonresidents should have GPA values of 
3.1 or higher to meet the preferred require- 
ments for admission. All applicants are encour- 
aged to take the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) 
in April of the year prior to admission but must 
take the DAT for the first time by no later than 
October of the year prior to admission. 

A pamphlet describing the test and an appli- 
cation to take the test will be sent to the appli- 
cant upon request made to the Office of Re- 
cruitment and Admissions of the Dental 
School. The pamphlet lists the dates of the tests 
(given in April and October) and the location 
of testing centers throughout the United States, 
its possessions and Canada. Residents of Mary- 
land should have scores of 4 or higher in the 
Academic Average and the Perceptual Ability 
sections in order to be competitive; nonresi- 
dents should have scores of 5 or higher in these 
sections to meet the preferred requirements for 
admission. Information on the regulations for 
the determination of resident status may be ob- 
tained from the Office of Admissions and Reg- 
istrations, Room 132, Howard Hall, University 
of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201. 



Application and Acceptance 
Procedures 

Students are admitted only at the beginning of 
the fall semester in August. All applications are 
processed through the American Association of 
Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS). 
An AADSAS application request card will be 
sent to the applicant after May 1 of the year 
prior to the desired date of admission upon re- 
quest made to the Office of Recruitment and 
Admissions of the Dental School. The 
AADSAS application must be filed by all ap- 
plicants prior to December 1 ; early filing of the 



13 



application is strongly recommended. AADSAS 
will duplicate the transcript, calculate the grade 
point average of each applicant, and furnish 
pertinent information to the Office of Recruit- 
ment and Admissions of the Dental School. 
If the requirements for admission are ful- 
filled, the applicant will receive the Dental 
School's application form, which should be 
completed and mailed with the application fee 
to the Office of Recruitment and Admissions of 
the Dental School. If receipt of the application 
and application fee is not acknowledged within 
ten days, the applicant should contact the Of- 
fice of Recruitment and Admissions. All appli- 
cants who are seriously being considered will 
be interviewed; a personal interview does not, 
however, guarantee admission. The Subcom- 
mittee on Dental Student Admissions, com- 
posed of members of the faculty, students and 
alumni, selects qualified applicants for admis- 
sion based on the applicant's grade point aver- 
age, DAT scores, personal recommendations 
and the personal interview. A deposit of $200 
must accompany an applicant's acceptance of 
an offer of admission. The deposit is intended 
to ensure registration in the class, is credited 
toward the applicant's tuition, and is not re- 
fundable. 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

It is the policy of the Faculty Council of the 
Dental School that neither graduates of foreign 
dental schools nor students transferring from 
dental schools outside the continental United 
States be considered for admission with ad- 
vanced standing. Graduates of foreign dental 
schools may take an examination given by the 
Maryland State Board of Dental Examiners in 
order to qualify for a license to practice in the 
State of Maryland. Those who do not pass the 
examination can make application, according to 
established policies and procedures, to be con- 
sidered for admission to the Dental School as a 
regular first year student. Any student accepted 
for admission may be exempted from certain 
courses by passing a competency examination. 

Students currently attending a dental school 
in the continental United States may apply for 
admission with advanced standing, but must be 
in good standing in scholarship and character to 
be considered for admission. An applicant for 
transfer from another dental school must: 

• meet fully the requirements for admission 
described above 

• be eligible for advancement to the next 
higher class in the school from which the 
applicant seeks to transfer 



14 



• have an overall average of C (2.0 on a 4. C 
scale) in all previous dental school courses 
excluding basic dental science or its equiv- 
alent and oral pathology, in which the ap- 
plicant must have a grade of C or higher 

• present a letter of honorable withdrawal 
and recommendation from the dean of the 
school from which the applicant is trans- 
ferring 

All applicants who meet these requirements 
will be sent the Dental School's application 
forms and will be scheduled for an interview. 
They will be required to submit an academic 
record from the dental school which they are 
currently attending. This record will be referred 
to the appropriate department chairmen of the 
Dental School for review and recommendation 
concerning acceptance and evaluation. The ad- 
mission of a student by transfer is, in every 
case, contingent upon the availability of space 
in the class to which the student is seeking ad- 
mission. Credit hours, as listed in the prior aca^ 
demic record of the transferring student, will be 
prorated to conform with the cumulative credit 
hours of students in that class, in order to es- 
tablish a comparable cumulative grade point av- 
erage and class rank for purposes of University 
and Dental School honors, letters of recommen- 
dation, etc. 

UMES— UMAB Honors Program 

In Fall 1979, the University of Maryland East- 
ern Shore (UMES), in cooperation with the 
professional schools of the University of Mary- 
land at Baltimore (UMAB), instituted an 
Honors Program in an effort to prepare students 
for professional school study while providing 
them with a sound liberal arts education at the 
same time. The Honors Program consists of 
honors sections in chemistry, biology, mathe- 
matics, English and social science. It also em- 
phasizes independent study, seminars and collo- 
quia through which students are expected to 
explore in depth the various disciplines. Spe- 
cific preprofessional tracks in allied health, 
dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, 
and social work and community planning are 
available. Upon successful completion of all re- 
quirements of the Honors Program, which in- 
clude the professional school admission require- 
ments, the Honors Program graduate will be 
admitted into the corresponding professional 
school on the UMAB campus during the year 
immediately following graduation from UMES. 
Admission into the Honors Program is deter- 
mined by the Honors Program Committee 
which is composed of representatives from 







UMES and each professional school at UMAB. 
A combination of predictive factors, such as 

I SAT scores, an interview(s), a personal state- 
ment written at the time of the interview, and 
letters of recommendation, will be used to de- 
termine the eligibility of a student for admis- 
sion into the Honors Program. The cumulative 

i academic performance of an applicant, as indi- 
cated by the high school record, will be as- 
sessed. Students anticipating possible entrance 
into the Program should have concentrated and 
excelled in an academically enriched curricu- 
lum beginning as early as the freshman year in 
high school. For additional information, write 
to the Honors Committee, University of Mary- 
land Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 
21853. 

Optional Combined Arts and 
Sciences/Dental Program 

The University of Maryland at College Park, 
University of Maryland Baltimore County, 
Coppin State College and Morgan State Univer- 
sity offer a combined arts and sciences dental 
curriculum leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery. The 
preprofessional part of this curriculum may be 
taken in residence in the College of Arts and 



Sciences on any of the four campuses, and the 
professional part in the Dental School in Balti- 
more. Students who have been approved for the 
combined program and who have completed the 
arts and sciences phase may, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Dean of the Dental School, 
be granted the degree of Bachelor of Science 
by the College of Arts and Sciences at the first 
summer commencement following the comple- 
tion of the student's first year in the Dental 
School. Further information and applications 
may be obtained from the Office of Admissions 
at the respective undergraduate college. 



Academic Policies 

In the evaluation of student performance, the 
following letter grades are used: 



A —excellent 
B —good 
C —satisfactory 
D —below average 



E —conditional 
F —failure 
I —incomplete 



A failure must be absolved by repeating the 
entire course, in which case the original F 
grade remains on the student's permanent re- 
cord, but only the new grade is used to com- 
pute the grade point average. 

A student whose performance at the end of a 
course is not satisfactory in one or more 
segments or in some clinical procedures may 
receive the E grade. The E grade, which re- 
mains on the student record, is used only as a 
temporary final grade. This grade implies that 
the student should achieve a satisfactory level 
of proficiency within a short time without hav- 
ing to repeat the entire course. Following suc- 
cessful remediation, the student will receive the 
final grade earned in the course. An unresolved 
grade of E will result in a permanent grade of F. 

A student whose work in completed assign- 
ments is of acceptable quality but who, because 
of circumstances beyond his control (such as 
illness or disability), has been unable to com- 
plete course requirements will receive a grade 
of Incomplete. When all requirements have 
been satisfied, the student will receive the final 
grade earned in the course. Except under ex- 
traordinary circumstances, an Incomplete may 
not be carried into the next academic year. 

In the clinical sciences, performance at the D 
level is unacceptable; thus the D grade is not 
used by the clinical departments or Basic Den- 
tal Science. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the ba- 
sis of credits assigned to each course and the 



15 



following numerical values for grades: A-4, B- 
3, C-2, D-l, F-0. The grade point average is 
the sum of the products of course credits and 
grade values, divided by the total number of 
course credits in that year of the curriculum. 

Students must achieve a 2.0 grade point aver- 
age in order to advance unconditionally to the 
next year. Probationary advancement may be 
permitted for students in the following catego- 
ries: 

1) First-year students who obtain a grade 
point average of 1.70-1.99 

2) Second-year students who obtain a grade 
point average of 1.70-1.99 in second-year 
courses 

3) Third-year students who obtain a grade 
point average of 1.85-1.99 in third-year 
courses 

A student placed on probationary status must 
achieve a minimum 2.0 average in courses 
taken during the probationary academic calen- 
dar year. Failure to do so will result in dismis- 
sal from the dental program subject to discre- 
tionary review by the Faculty Council. 

A student may be permitted to absolve defi- 
ciencies during the summer session, as recom- 
mended by the appropriate Advancement Com- 
mittee and approved by the Faculty Council. 
Depending on the type of deficiencies involved, 
students may be required to register and pay a 
fee for the summer session. 

The performance of each student is reviewed 
at the end of the first semester and at the end 
of the academic year by an Advancement Com- 
mittee. At the end of the first semester, the 
Committee determines, on the basis of progress 
and/or final grades, whether the student is pro- 
gressing satisfactorily; if warranted, remedia- 
tion, assignment to a special program (first- or 
second-year students only), or dismissal may be 
recommended to the Faculty Council. 

Students assigned to a special program are 
placed under the supervision of the Special Ac- 
ademic Programs Committee, which tailors a 
program to the needs and abilities of each stu- 
dent and determines advancement or dismissal 
on the basis of progress and/or final grades at 
the end of each semester. All first- and second- 
year courses must have been completed satis- 
factorily before the student may be advanced 
into the regular third-year curriculum. 

At the end of the academic year, the appro- 
priate Advancement Committee recommends 
for each student either unconditional advance- 
ment, probationary advancement, repeat of the 
year, or academic dismissal to the Faculty 
Council, which must approve all Advancement 
Committee decisions. 



16 



Attendance Policy 

The faculty and administration of the Dental 
School expect every student to attend all sched- 
uled lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions and 
clinic assignments, except in the event of ill- 
ness or emergency. In circumstances of this 
nature, absence must be reported to the Dean's 
office so that departments can be notified to as- 
sist the student upon his return. 

Specially Tailored Educational 
Program 

The Specially Tailored Educational Program 
(STEP) functions within the framework of the 
regular curriculum but allows students to spend 
up to three years completing first- and second- 
year courses. The program was developed for 
students who, because of academic difficulty, 
illness or other circumstances, need special as- 
sistance and/or additional time to fulfill the ac- 
ademic requirements. 

The First and Second Year Advancement 
Committees may offer a student the option of 
STEP or assign to STEP any student whose 
progress is unsatisfactory, if it is generally 
agreed that a reduced load and/or special tuto- 
rial assistance may improve the student's 
chance of successfully completing course re- 
quirements. 

Students assigned to STEP are placed under 
the supervision of the Special Academic Pro- 
grams Committee, which plans for each student 
a program suited to his particular needs and 
carefully monitors his progress. Departmental 
counselors in the basic sciences and preclinical 
sciences are available to assist any student as- 
signed to STEP. 

Students may be advanced into the regular 
program when they have demonstrated satisfac- 
tory progress; otherwise they remain in STEP 
until they have completed all first- and second- 
year courses. Once the student is advanced into 
the regular program, his academic progress is 
evaluated by the appropriate Advancement 
Committee. 



The Minimester 

Didactic courses offered to all students in the 
January minimester are elective. Third- and 
fourth-year students may participate only in 
those courses scheduled before 10:00 a.m., 
since the clinic continues to operate on the 
usual schedule during the minimester. Any 
credit awarded for minimester elective courses 
will not be applied to the D.D.S. degree. 



Information concerning course offerings is 
distributed to all students by the Office of Aca- 
demic Affairs. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is con- 
ferred upon a candidate who has met the condi- 
tions specified below: 

1) A candidate must have satisfied all re- 
quirements of the various departments. 

2) A candidate must have achieved a mini- 
mum 2.0 average in fourth-year courses. 

3) The candidate must have paid all indebt- 
edness to the University prior to gradua- 
tion. 

Early Graduation 

The University of Maryland Dental School's 
early graduation program enables talented, con- 
scientious students who have completed all re- 
quirements to be recommended by the faculty 
for graduation in January of the fourth year. 
This is not a special educational program. 
Students who qualify must have had educa- 
tional experiences comparable to those of stu- 
dents who will graduate in June and must have 
achieved at least the same degree of clinical 
proficiency. 

Dental School Student and Faculty 
Dress Regulations 

The overall appearance of the health care pro- 
vider (students and faculty) should be one of 
neatness and cleanliness. The purpose of this 
standard of appearance is to enhance the 
patient-provider relationship, to maintain clini- 
cal asepsis, and to maintain the favorable pub- 
lic image of this institution as a professional 
health care center. 
These regulations apply to all undergraduate, 
; dental hygiene, Advanced Specialty Education 
students, and faculty. 

• In all patient-care areas, men will wear 
clean, neat slacks, a clinic jacket approved 
by the Clinical Sciences Council and a col- 
lared shirt and tie. Women will wear a 
clinic jacket approved by the Clinical Sci- 
ences Council over dress clothes. If a short 
sleeve clinic jacket is worn, either a short 
sleeve shirt or blouse should be worn or 
sleeves should be rolled above the elbows. 
(Shirt sleeves should not be exposed to 
aerosols created by instrumentation.) Infor- 
mal attire such as denim jeans or athletic 
shoes or shoes without hose will not be 



worn in patient-care areas. Clinical attire 
for dental hygiene students is specified in 
the appropriate section of the Clinic Man- 
ual. 

• Steps will be taken to control body odor 
and unpleasant breath at all times. Further, 
fingernails should be properly trimmed and 
clean. 

• It is not appropriate for students or faculty 
to wear clinic jackets off campus except in 
patient-provider and other professional cir- 
cumstances. 

• Surgical scrub shirts are to be worn only in 
Oral Surgery or during the performance of 
specialty surgery. The above regulations 
apply in all clinical areas in Hayden-Harris 
Hall and affiliation sites (unless specifi- 
cally stated in the General Clinic Manual) 
where patient care is being delivered or ar- 
eas reserved for patient care between the 
hours of 8:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m. and at all 
other times when patient care is being de- 
livered. 

• At all times, in classroom and multidiscip- 
linary and clinical support laboratories men 
will wear clean, neat pants and a collared 
shirt. Ties and clinic jackets are optional. 
Women will likewise wear dress clothes, 
with clinic jackets being optional. 

• In all areas not described in the regulations 
above, the department chairman responsi- 
ble for the area may prescribe appropriate 
dress. 




17 




Lack of Compliance/Sanctions The pri- 
mary responsibility for complying with and en- 
forcing these regulations rests with the individ- 
ual. Students in violation of these regulations 
will be dismissed from the laboratory, clinical 
area and/or lecture room by the supervising 
faculty member(s) until these regulations have 
been met. Department chairmen will ensure 
that these guidelines are complied with and en- 
forced. 

A written incident report describing the nat- 
ure of a violation will be forwarded to and filed 
in the Office of the Associate Dean, with a 
copy to the student, within one working day 
following the infraction. Subsequent violations 



of these regulations by a given student will be 
forwarded by the Associate Dean to the Judicial 
Board for action by the Board. 

Student Expenses 

The budget guide below is provided as a rea- 
sonable approximation of average expenditures 
by students enrolled during 1982-83. Estimates 
are for students living away from home; single 
students who live in University facilities will 
pay approximately $1500 in housing fees for 
the 1982-83 academic year. 

To these expenses must be added the costs of 
instruments, supplies and books. 



Approximate Average Expenditures 1982-83 



Tuition 

Resident 

Non-Resident 

Fees and Health Insurance 

Food 

Lodging (includes utilities) 
Personal (clothing, laundry, 

incidentals) 

Travel 

* Third Year 



Single 




Married 




9 month 


1 1 month* 


9 month 


1 1 month 


$3658 


$3658 


$3658 


$3658 


7186 


7186 


7186 


7186 


450 


450 


450 


450 


1000 


1200 


1270 


1530 


1900 


2250 


3700 


4850 


750 


870 


930 


1090 


1170 


1430 


1170 


1430 



Instruments and Supplies. Every student is 
required to purchase a full kit of unused items. 
A complete list of essential instruments and 
materials for all courses is compiled by the 
Special Committee on Instruments and Equip- 
ment. Cost of instrument packages is not in- 
cluded in tuition and must be paid at the time 
of delivery. 

The approximate cost of required instruments 
for the 1982-83 session are listed below to pro- 
vide a guideline of the expenditures involved. 
First Year $2990.00 

Second Year $1456.00 

Third Year $ 627.00 

Textbooks. A list of textbooks recommended 
for first-year courses is mailed to incoming stu- 
dents during the summer prior to enrollment. 
Textbook lists for second-, third- and fourth- 
year courses are circulated at the beginning of 
the academic year. The campus bookstore 
stocks these books; students may purchase 
books there or at other local bookstores. Ap- 
proximate costs of textbooks and other instruc- 
tional materials are as follows: 
First Year $300 

Second Year 200 

Third Year 75 

Fourth 25 

Student Judicial Policy 

Professional Code of Conduct. As a stu- 
dent in a health profession, it is important to 
realize that in our society the health practitioner 
functions mainly on the basis of self-discipline, 
rather than on imposed regulation, and receives 
a high degree of public confidence and trust. 
By accepting a Code of Conduct, which repre- 
sents this trust, the student demonstrates the de- 
sire to be fully prepared for the obligation to 
the dental profession and to the people served. 

As traditionally expected of all health profes- 
sionals, the student will demonstrate the highest 
standards of integrity at all times. Students are 
expected at all times to conduct themselves in 
accordance with all codes, rules and regulations 
of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland. 

The following behaviors, while not all inclu- 
sive, are considered to be offenses of the Pro- 
fessional Code of Conduct. 

• Unprofessional Conduct. This includes all 
forms of conduct which fail to meet the stan- 
dards of the dental profession such as: lack of 
personal cleanliness, use of abusive language or 
behavior in the presence of a patient or faculty 
member, and disruption of class or any other 
school activity. 



• Academic Misconduct. This includes all 
forms of student academic misconduct includ- 
ing but not limited to plagiarism, cheating on 
examinations, violation of examination proce- 
dures, and submitting work for evaluation that 
is not one's own efforts. 

• Dishonesty. This includes knowingly furnish- 
ing false information through forgery, alteration 
or misuse of documents or records with intent 
to deceive; presenting written or oral statements 
known to be false; loaning, transferring, alter- 
ing or otherwise misusing University identifica- 
tion materials. 

• Theft or Destruction of Property. This in- 
cludes unauthorized possessing or receiving 
property that does not belong to you, such as 
instruments, books, supplies, keys, etc.; caus- 
ing damage, defacement, or destruction of 
property not belonging to you. 

• Forcible entry into University facilities. 

• Intentional infliction or threat of bodily 
harm. 

• Possession of drugs or dangerous weapons. 

• Aiding or Abetting. This includes conspiring 
with or knowingly aiding or abetting another 
person to engage in any proscribed activity. 

• Violation of any codes, rules, and regula- 
tions of the Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, Dental School, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore. 

Any irregularities concerning professional 
conduct occurring inside or outside of the Den- 
tal School may be reported to a chairperson of 
the Judicial Board (a standing committee of the 
Faculty Council), who may refer the matter to 
the Judicial Board or other appropriate persons. 

A copy of the Student Judicial Policy and 
Student Grievance Policy is distributed to all 
students upon matriculation. 

Employment Opportunities in 
Dentistry 

The public demand for more and better oral 
health care will continue to create a climate for 
growth in the dental profession. 

Current dental graduates can anticipate initial 
annual net income on the average of $22,000 
per annum. This income is contingent upon and 
can be affected by the area served, the practice 
specialty, and the state of the economy at the 
time. 



19 



The Dental Curriculum 



Subjects 



Year I 



Credits 



Semesters 
1 2 



Total 



Anatomy 13 13 

DANA 511 

Basic Dental Science 7 7 14 

DENT 518 

Biochemistry 5 5 

DBIC 511 

Conjoint Sciences 3 3 

DCJS512 

Microbiology 5 5 

DMIC 512 

Oral Health Care Delivery 1 2 3 

OHCD 518 

Physiology 5 5 

DPHS 512 



26 



22 



48 



Subjects 



Year II 



Credits 



Semesters 

1 2 



Total 



Basic Dental Science 12 

DENT 528 

Biomedicine 5 

DPAT 528 

Conjoint Sciences 6 

DCJS 528 

Oral Health Care Delivery • 1 

OHCD 528 

Pharmacology 5 

DPHR521 



13 


25 


7 


12 


6 


12 


2 


3 




5 



29 



28 



57 



20 



The Dental Curriculum 



Year 



Subjects 



Credits 



Semesters 
1 2 



Total 



Conjoint Sciences 

DCJS 538 

Oral Diagnosis/Radiology . . . 

DPAT 538 

Oral Health Care Delivery . . . 

OHCD 538 

or 

OHCD 539 Special Studies 

(elective) 

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 
DSUR 538 

Orthodontics 

ORTH 538 

Pediatric Dentistry 

PEDS 538 

Periodontics 

PERI 538 

Fixed Restorative Dentistry . . 
FIXD 538 

Removable Prosthodontics . . . 
fREMV 538 

Endodontics 

ENDO 538 



2 


4 


4 


7 


4 


6 




(6) 


3 


5 


1 


2 


4 


8 


5 


11 


7 


13 


2 


8 


2 


4 



34 



34 



32 



32 



68 



Subjects 


Year IV 




Credits 








l 


Semesters 

2 


Total 


Conjoint Sciences 

DCJS 548 

Clinic 




3 
29 


3 
29 


6 

58 











64 



21 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

ANATOMY 

Chairman: D. Vincent Provenza 
Professors: Barry, Piavis, Provenza 
Associate Professors: Gartner, Hiatt, Meszler, 

Seibel 
Associate Clinical Professor: Scherlis 
Assistant Professor: Khan 
Assistant Clinical Professor: Mader 
Lecturer: Lindenberg 

The basic course in human anatomy consists of 
a thorough study of the cells, tissues, organs 
and organ systems of the body from the gross, 
microscropic and developmental aspects. Prin- 
ciples of body structure and function are stud- 
ied with particular emphasis on those concerned 
with the head, facial region, oral cavity and as- 
sociated organs. Neuroanatomy deals with the 
gross and microscropic structure of the central 
nervous system and peripheral nerves with spe- 
cial attention to functional phases. Correlation 
is made with other courses in the basic science 
and clinical disciplines of the dental curricu- 
lum. 
DANA 511. Human Anatomy (13) 



BASIC DENTAL SCIENCE 

Acting Director: Harold L. Crossley 

Clinical Professor: Halpert 

Associate Professors: Moffitt, Thompson 

Assistant Professor: Crossley 

Staff: All clinical departments 

Basic Dental Science is the administrative unit 
directly responsible for teaching the fundamen- 
tal principles, techniques and manual skills re- 
lated to the practice of dentistry during the first 
and second years of the curriculum. Areas of 
instruction include dental morphology and oc- 
clusion, preventive dentistry, periodontics, den- 
tal materials, operative dentistry, fixed partial 
prosthodontics, removable complete and partial 
prosthodontics, endodontics, pediatric dentistry, 
orthodontics, oral surgery, and oral diagnosis 
and radiology. The instructional format in- 
cludes the use of lectures, laboratory projects, 
self-instructional media, assigned reading, clini- 
cal assignments, and both written and practical 
examinations. Course planning and presentation 
are coordinated by the Director and involve the 
cooperative effort of members of every clinical 
department. 

DENT 518. Basic Dental Science I (14) 
DENT 528. Basic Dental Science II (25) 




BIOCHEMISTRY 

Chairman: John P. Lambooy 
Professors: Chang, Lambooy, Leonard 
Associate Professors: Bashirelahi, Thut 
Assistant Professor: Courtade 
Assistant Research Professor: Charles 

Biochemistry is a study of life's processes in 
terms of molecular structure of food substances 
and body constituents. The Department has twq 
teaching goals: to present a course in compre- 
hensive biochemistry to the first-year students 
seeking a professional degree in dentistry, and 
to provide a program of specialized training foi 
graduate students seeking an advanced graduate 
degree (M.S., Ph.D.) in preparation for a ca- 
reer in teaching and/or research. 

The course provided for students studying fo 
the Doctor of Dental Surgery degree covers the 
major traditional subjects of biochemistry. Den 
tal students who have previously taken a course 
in biochemistry may take a competency exami- 
nation which, if passed satisfactorily, permits 
them to be excused from taking this course. 
The Department also participates in the Con- 
joint Sciences program. 
DBIC 511. Principles of Biochemistry (5) 



22 



t CLERKSHIP PROGRAM 
Two elective clerkship programs allow selected 
ourth-year students to pursue further studies in 
departmental activities specially designed to 

eet their needs and interests. Students devote 
a portion of their clinic time to these special- 

ed programs; the remaining clinic time is 
spent in the comprehensive treatment of pa- 
ients in the regular program. Clerkships are 
^available in both basic science and clinical dis- 
ciplines. 
DCJS 558. Clerkship I (elective ) (19) 
'DCJS 559. Clerkship II (elective) (10) 

t 
CLINICAL DENTISTRY 

[Staff: All clinical departments 

The clinical education program is designed to 
provide each student with a broad background 
of clinical experience based on the philosophy 
of prevention and comprehensive patient care. 
Although the need for the treatment of existing 
disease is of paramount importance, the clinical 
program stresses those aspects of complete den- 
tal care which are founded on preventing the 
occurrence or recurrence of disease. Each stu- 
dent provides patient care in a manner similar 
to the general practitioner in the community. 
Clinical areas for undergraduate instruction are 
designated as general practice clinics or spe- 
cialty clinics. Team teaching is accomplished 
using general dentists and specialists providing 
interdepartmental instruction for the student and 
the highest level of dental care for the patient. 
The clinical program functions each month of 
the year in order to provide continuity of pa- 
tient care. 

CONJOINT SCIENCES 

Director: Harold L. Crossley 

Staff: All departments 
. 

(The program in Conjoint Sciences is designed 
to coordinate the biological and clinical sci- 
ences in an effort to discuss subjects of a multi- 
disciplinary nature. The first and second years 
jare more heavily oriented toward the basic sci- 

- ences and the third and fourth years more di- 
rectly related to general and special clinical 
problems. 

Important features of special programs in the 
dental curriculum are introduced to the first- 
year student. Topics such as the etiology and 
histopathology of dental caries, prevention of 
dental disease, immunology, and the diagnosis 
and treatment of pulp and periapical disease are 



presented in the second year. In the third year 
the management of clinical problems associated 
with a broad spectrum of patient types is dis- 
cussed, with special emphasis on therapeutics. 
The curriculum in the fourth year includes a re- 
quired unit on practice administration and a 
wide range of elective course offerings. 

Throughout the four years of Conjoint Sci- 
ences, instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscita- 
tion and blood pressure measurement leads to 
certification in these life-saving procedures. 
Comprehensive instruction in the control of 
pain and anxiety and dental management of 
handicapped patients also is incorporated into 
the Conjoint Sciences program. 
DCJS 512. Conjoint Sciences I (3) 
DCJS 528. Conjoint Sciences II (12) 
DCJS 538. Conjoint Sciences III (4) 
DCJS 548. Conjoint Sciences IV (6) 

DENTAL CARE FOR THE HANDICAPPED 

Acting Director, Special Patient Program: 
Roger L. Eldridge 

This program provides dental students with the 
fundamentals for delivering dental care to hand- 
icapped children and adults. The didactic por- 
tion spans three years of the curriculum and in- 
cludes information on the nature of 
handicapping conditions and their effects on the 
patient. Emphasis is on the clinical dental man- 
agement of patients with handicapping disor- 
ders. The didactic phase utilizes independent 
learning resources, augmented by scheduled 
faculty instruction. During the third and fourth 
years, students provide care for handicapped 
patients in the Special Patient Clinic, a facility 
specifically designed and operated for this pur- 
pose. The program emphasizes the special 
needs of the handicapped that must be consid- 
ered in order for diagnostic, preventive and 
corrective dental services to be provided. 

EDUCATIONAL AND INSTRUCTIONAL 
RESOURCES 

Chairman: James F. Craig 
Professor: Moreland 
Associate Professor: Craig 
Assistant Professor: Romberg 
Associate Staff: Land 

The Department of Educational and Instruc- 
tional Resources has as its primary objective 
the implementation of a comprehensive instruc- 
tional development program embracing all areas 
of the dental curriculum. Such a program ap- 
plies the principles of management to the pro- 
cess of education and is designed to maintain a 



23 




constant focus on the quality of the education 
being provided students pursuing a career in 
dentistry or dental hygiene. Facilities include a 
closed-circuit color television system and 
graphic and photographic support area for the 
development of media in a variety of formats. 
The Department's staff is readily available for 
assistance to the faculty in the design and de- 
velopment of independent learning materials for 
the dental curriculum, or for consultation re- 
garding media applications in a variety of edu- 
cational settings. 

The Department also maintains an Indepen- 
dent Learning Center (ILC) which houses 
eighty-six study carrels and three group study 
areas specifically for the use of self- 
instructional media by students. The ILC is 
available for utilization from morning through 
early evening hours on weekdays and Satur- 
days, and provides a spacious and comfortable 
atmosphere for independent study. 

Additionally, the Department endeavors to 
provide the dental practitioner the opportunity 
to continue his education by making available a 
variety of instructional materials in an indepen- 
dent learning format. 



ENDODONTICS 

Chairman: James L. Gutmann 
Professor: Van Hassel 
Associate Professor: Gutmann 
Associate Clinical Professors: Andrews, 

August, Schunick 
Assistant Professors: Dumsha, Hovland, 

Warren 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Ehrenreich, 

Heaton, Krzeminski, Mattocks, Quarantillo 
Clinical Instructors: B. Jespersen, Lucas, 

Mihle, Siegel, Trager, Wiscovitch 
Clinical Research Associate: Jefferies 

The student's introduction to endodontics be- 
gins in the second year as part of Basic Dental 
Science II. It consists of a series of lectures 
and laboratories which stress the fundamentals 
of root canal therapy. Upon successful comple- 
tion of this course the student is ready to per- 
form the same procedures on clinical patients 
who warrant this treatment. 

In the third year, lectures are presented 
which stress diagnosis and the integration of 
the biological aspects of endodontics into the 
clinical setting. Cases are treated clinically with 



24 



the student demonstrating an acceptable level of 
mastery by the completion of the third year. 

The fourth-year experience in endodontics is 
primarily clinical. A mastery of clinical endo- 
dontics on more complex cases is expected of 
each student. 

ENDO 538. Principles of Clinical Endodontics 
(4) 
ENDO 548. Endodontic Clinic (4) 

EXTRAMURAL TRAINING PROGRAM 

Director: Mark L. Wagner 

The Extramural Training Program is designed 
to provide an educational experience for all 
dental students. After completion of the junior 
year, students are assigned to a dental treatment 
facility for a four- week period. These students 
are offered an opportunity to participate in pa- 
tient care at dental treatment facilities under the 
supervision of a preceptor. 

This educational experience is designed to al- 
low students to observe and participate in the 
operation of a dental practice or extramural 
clinical facility; to encourage practitioner- 
student interchange concerning concepts in den- 
tistry; and to develop the student's insight into 
the role of the general practitioner, including 
his relationship with other health professionals, 
community health resources, and the commu- 
nity at large. 

Preceptors participating in the program are 
located in urban and rural communities of 
Maryland and at United States Coast Guard 
Stations throughout the United States. It may 
be necessary that some of the additional costs 
for this assignment be borne by the student 
(i.e., travel, lodging, meals). 

AREA HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER 
PROGRAM 

Director: George C. Williams 

One of the University of Maryland at Balti- 
more's commitments toward improving health 
care and delivery programs in primary care is 
evidenced in the Area Health Education Center 
(AHEC) program. 

The AHEC program has been developed to 
provide a comprehensive health care education 
program for dental students, as well as for stu- 
dents from the other five UMAB professional 
schools. There are three basic types of AHECs 
established: rural, urban and geriatric. The ru- 
ral AHEC is located in Western Maryland. Ur- 
ban and geriatric AHECs are comprised of sev- 
eral local hospitals, clinics, and private 
practices. Assignments are coordinated through 
the Extramural Training Program. 



FIXED RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY 

Chairman: George F. Buchness 

Professor: Greeley 

Clinical Professor: M. Graham 

Associate Professors: Buchness, Diaz, Haroth, 
Mastrola 

Associate Clinical Professors: Finagin, 
Livaditis 

Assistant Professors: Bradbury, DiGianni, 
Gingell, Holston, Jeffrey, Nelson, Payne, 
Strassler, Tewes, Whitaker, G.H. Williams, 
Wood 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Abraham, Belt, 
Iddings, VandenBosche, Zeller 

Clinical Instructors: Berman, Burdick, 

Dietrich, Freundlich, Gordon, Halpern, Ku- 
lick, Liu, Miller, Mitchell, Muller, Russell, 
Scaggs, Schubert, Sweeney, Taneyhill, Ward 

Lecturer: Griswold 

Associate Staff: Britt, Suls 

The scope of instruction in fixed restorative 
dentistry involves the art and science of replac- 
ing missing teeth and lost or diseased tooth 
structure with fixed (non-removable) restora- 
tions; the disciplines of operative dentistry and 
fixed partial prosthodontics are included. The 
undergraduate teaching program is integrated 
throughout the four-year curriculum. 

The Department of Fixed Restorative Dentis- 
try is reponsible for major segments of the 
courses in Basic Dental Science, in which stu- 
dents are introduced to fundamental principles, 
and develop the manual skills necessary for 
clinical treatment of patients. The first-year 
program includes methods and materials used 




25 



to restore individual teeth, and an understand- 
ing of the destructive process of dental caries 
and the preventive aspects of restorative treat- 
ment. Second-year students are introduced to 
concepts and skills used in replacement of 
missing teeth with fixed partial prostheses. In- 
structional methodology includes lectures, tele- 
vision demonstrations, slide-tape instructional 
manual programs and laboratory exercises on 
simulated human dentition. During the first two 
years, limited but increasing clinical patient 
treatment with close staff supervision augments 
and reinforces the foundation provided. 

During the third and fourth years, didactic in- 
struction and extensive clinical treatment with 
staff guidance facilitate the application and in- 
tegration of fundamentals of operative dentistry 
and fixed partial prosthodontics. The Depart- 
ment also participates in the Conjoint Sciences 
program. 

FIXD 538. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (13) 
FIXD 548. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (15) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Chairman: William A. Falkler, Jr. 

Professor: Krywolap 

Associate Professors: Delisle, Falkler, Minah, 

Nauman, Sydiskis 
Assistant Professor: H. Williams 
Special Lecturers: Hawley, Joseph, Libonati, 

Oryshkevych, Snyder 

The Department of Microbiology offers under- 
graduate and graduate programs. The under- 
graduate program is organized to supply the 
student with the fundamental principles of mi- 
crobiology in order that he may understand the 
chemical and biological mechanisms of the pro- 
duction of disease by bacteria and other para- 
sites, and the means by which the host protects 
itself against bacteria and related organisms. 
The graduate programs leading toward the de- 
grees of Master of Science and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy are designed to train students for posi- 
tions in research and teaching, particularly in 
dental schools. 
DMIC 512. Microbiology (5) 

ORAL DIAGNOSIS 

Chairman: C. Daniel Overholser 

Professor: Hasler 

Clinical Professor: Brotman 

Associate Professors: Aks, Overholser, Park, 

Peterson 
Associate Clinical Professor: Bloom 
Assistant Professors: Balciunas, DePaola, 

Kutcher, Meiller, Sikorski 



Assistant Clinical Professors: Horlick, Katz, 

Lee, Llewellyn, Levin, Vandermer, Weiner 
Instructors: Emerson, L. Williams 
Clinical Instructors: Bacharach, Brooks, 
Brown, Carrion, Levin, Markoff, Shulman, 
Slotke, Tomney, Vaughn 

The curriculum in oral diagnosis includes the 
basic principles of the patient interview, the 
fundamentals of physical examination, recogni- 
tion of oral disease, and the management of pa- 
tients with oral and/or systemic disease. 

Principles of Biomedicine, an interdiscipli- 
nary course taught in conjunction with the De- 
partment of Oral Pathology, introduces the 
second-year student to oral diagnosis through 
didactic presentations concerning the patient in- 
terview, clinical examination, oral radiology, 
and treatment planning. Clinical aspects of the 
course are introduced through Basic Dental Sci- 
ence. 

Principles of oral diagnosis are taught in the 
third and fourth years clinically and didactical- 
ly. These courses reinforce the concept that the 
dentist should receive adequate training in ob- 
taining medical histories, performing appropri- 
ate physical examinations, interpreting the 
results of various laboratory tests, and, most 
importantly, relating the physical status of the 
patient to the dental treatment plan. 
DPAT 528. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 
DPAT 538. Principles of Oral Diagnosis/ 
Radiology (7) 

DPAT 548. Principles of Oral Diagnosis/ 
Radiology (4) 

ORAL HEALTH CARE DELIVERY 

Acting Chairman: Leonard A. Cohen 
Associate Professors: Cohen, W. Morganstein 
Associate Clinical Professor: Shulman 
Assistant Professors: Bebermeyer, Dana, 

Hay den, Long, Soble 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Bosmajian, Dent, 

B. Graham, Llewellyn, Maddox, Streckfus 
Instructors: Beelat, Eldridge, R. Jeffrey, G.C. 

Williams, Rullman, Serio 
Clinical Instructors: Eisenberg, Hoffman, 

Korb, Pusin, Sachs, Strahl, Weller 
Research Associate: LaBelle 
Special Lecturers: Abosch, Bloom, Bushel, 

Donnelly, Rogers, Snyder, Weinstein 

In its teaching, research and service activities 
the Department of Oral Health Care Delivery is 
committed to developing, evaluating and dis- 
seminating methods to meet oral health needs 
in ways that benefit both providers and recipi- 
ents of care. 



26 



The primary teaching areas are: (1) behav- 
ioral sciences, (2) practice management, (3) 
politics and economics of dentistry, (4) delivery 
systems, (5) health education, (6) epidemi- 
ology, and (7) sit-down four-handed dentistry 
and its application. During the four-year curric- 
ulum, the student participates in lectures, semi- 
nars, independent and small group projects, and 
a clinical program. Field experiences and spe- 
cial projects are also used to support the didac- 
tic presentations. 

The curriculum includes such topics as: oral 
health care issues and an introduction to human 
behavior, applied behavior analysis, and com- 
munication in the first year; human factors in 
health care: behavior and prevention, dental 
health education and community planning, epi- 
demiology, and review of scientific literature 
during the second year; practice planning, per- 
sonnel management, business systems, dental 
delivery systems, and sit-down four-handed 
dentistry clinic during the third year; and dental 
management applications and group practice 
simulation clinic in the fourth year. The third- 
and fourth-year clinic programs correlate and 
demonstrate delivery system alternatives using 
preventive, behavioral and modern practice 
management concepts. 



OHCD 518. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 528. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 
OHCD 538. Oral Health Care Delivery (6) 
OHCD 548. Oral Health Care Delivery (3) 

ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY 

Acting Chairman: Henry E. Richter 

Professor: DeVore 

Clinical Professor: Cappuccio 

Associate Professors: Bergman, Richter 

Associate Clinical Professor: Tilghman 

Assistant Professors: Eisen, Smith 

Assistant Clinical Professor: North 

Clinical Instructors: Ashman, Hamilton, Kahn, 

Kogan, P. Morganstein 
Special Lecturers: Helrich, Kowalewski 

Introductory lectures in minor oral and maxillo- 
facial surgery, preclinical laboratory in oral and 
maxillofacial surgery, and lectures and demon- 
strations in local anesthesia are given during 
the first and second semesters of the second 
year by departmental participation in Basic 
Dental Science II. Third-year lectures involve 
all phases of oral and maxillofacial surgery and 
general anesthesia. Students are rotated to the 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic in block 
assignments during the second, third and fourth 




27 



years for progressive participation in oral surgi- 
cal procedures. Fourth-year students are as- 
signed to University Hospital in block assign- 
ments for operating room experience and 
general anesthesia experience; they also take 
night calls with the Oral and Maxillofacial Sur- 
gery residents. The Department participates in 
three years of the Conjoint Sciences program. 
DSUR 538. Oral Surgery (5) 
DSUR 548. Oral Surgery (5) 

ORAL PATHOLOGY 

Chairman: Martin Lunin 

Professor: Lunin 

Associate Professors: Beckerman, Levy, 

Swancar 
Associate Clinical Professor: Mackler 
Assistant Professor: Arafat 

The undergraduate teaching program consists of 
an interdisciplinary course that covers the basic 
principles of pathology and medicine through 
presentation of the morphologic, chemical and 
physiologic changes of basic disease processes 
and important specific diseases. Emphasis is 
placed on the diagnosis, etiology, pathogenesis 
and clinical manifestations of disease processes 
in the oral cavity. The aim is to provide a 
sound basis for the differential diagnosis of oral 
lesions and a rationale for their treatment. The 
student is provided ample opportunity to de- 
velop proficiency in problem solving in oral di- 
agnosis. A variety of techniques for examina- 
tion and diagnosis are covered, including dental 
radiography. 

Graduate and postgraduate programs are of- 
fered for students desiring specialty or research 
training. 
DPAT 528. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 

ORTHODONTICS 

Chairman: William M. Davidson 

Professor: Davidson 

Clinical Professors: Grewe, Swinehart 

Associate Professors: Ceen, Smith 

Assistant Professor: R. Williams 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Bonebreak, 
Folio, Higginbottom, Long, Morris, Rubier, 
Schoenbrodt, Scornavacca, Sweren 

Clinical Instructors: Ingram, Minium, Rykiss, 
Schwartz, Sheinis, Terhune 

Associate Staff: Kreutzer 

The predoctoral program of instruction in or- 
thodontics is directed toward providing the den- 
tal student with the knowledge and skills neces- 
sary to: 



• recognize an established or developing mal- 
occlusion, 

• institute preventive and therapeutic treatment 
plans within the scope of the general dental 
practice, 

• consult as a team member with the specialist, 

• refer cases requiring specialist care as appro- 
priate, and 

• coordinate comprehensive care of the patient. 
Instruction in orthodontics occurs during all 

four years of the dental program. Didactic and 
laboratory exercises provide a strong foundation 
for delivery of limited orthodontic treatment as 
part of an adult and child patient's comprehen- 
sive dental care. Elective and clerkship oppor- 
tunities are available for those who wish to pur- 
sue additional course work and clinical 
experience. 

ORTH 538. Orthodontics (2) 
ORTH 548. Orthodontics (2) 

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY 

Chairman: James T. Rule 

Professors: Abrams, Rule 

Clinical Professor: Kihn 

Associate Professors: Minah, Owen, Shelton, 

Wagner 
Associate Clinical Professors: Balis, Schulz 
Assistant Professors: Josell, Kula 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Canion, Coll, 

Noble, Riger 
Associate Staff: Truelove 




28 




The primary introduction to dentistry for chil- 
dren begins in the third year through didactic 
instruction and clinical experiences and con- 
tinues during the fourth year of the dental pro- 
gram. The Department also participates in lec- 
ture and laboratory projects presented in Basic 
Dental Science and Conjoint Sciences during 
the first two years. Particular attention is de- 
voted to diagnosis and treatment planning, pre- 
ventive dentistry procedures including fluoride 
therapy, nonpunitive patient management tech- 
niques incorporating the use of psychopharma- 
cologic agents, treatment of traumatic injuries 
to the primary and young permanent dentition, 
restorative procedures in primary teeth, pulpal 
therapy, and interceptive orthodontics. Depart- 
mental educational goals are established ena- 
bling graduates to provide comprehensive den- 
tal care for the young patients while 
encouraging the development of a positive atti- 
tude toward dental care. 
PEDS 538. Pediatric Dentistry (8) 
PEDS 548. Pediatric Dentistry (6) 



PERIODONTICS 

Chairman: John J. Bergquist 
Professors: Bergquist, Bowers 



Clinical Professors: Halpert, Sobkov, Zupnik 
Associate Professors: Moffitt, Page 
Associate Clinical Professors: Lever, 

Livingston, Plessett, Winson 
Assistant Professors: Granet, Hayduk, Lesco 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Chmar, Eskow, 

Feldman, Sydney 
Clinical Instructors: Babinowich, Chen, 

Gannon, M. Jespersen, Keiser, Mandel, 

Peltzman, Shockett, Suzuki 
Instructor: Emerson 

Students are introduced to fundamental peri- 
odontics in lectures during the first and second 
years; clinical experience begins late in the sec- 
ond year of the dental program. In the third 
year, students have didactic exposure to ad- 
vanced periodontal procedures. Third- and 
fourth-year students enter into a learning con- 
tract that delineates a set of basic minimum 
clinical experiences. Interested students have 
the opportunity to choose from a broad range 
of additional experiences and to contract for 
both additional experience and the grade the 
student feels these experiences warrant. Thus, 
the individual student has substantial involve- 
ment in establishing his educational goals. 
PERI 538. Periodontics (11) 
PERI 548. Periodontics (11) 



29 



PHARMACOLOGY 

Chairman: Richard L. Wynn 
Professor: Rudo 
Clinical Professor: Dolle 
Associate Professors: Thut, Wynn 
Assistant Professors: Arthur, Crossley 

The program of instruction in pharmacology is 
divided into three phases. The first phase in- 
cludes a thorough study of basic concepts and 
principles in pharmacology using mainly proto- 
type drugs. Emphasis is placed on the mecha- 
nism of action of drugs, their absorption, distri- 
bution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity and 
drug interactions. The second phase deals with 
clinical aspects of oral and nutritional therapeu- 
tics and control of pain and anxiety, presented 
in the Conjoint Sciences program. Special at- 
tention is given to clinically useful drugs, their 
indications and contraindications. The third 
phase, designed for graduate, continuing educa- 
tion and postdoctoral students, is an in-depth 
coverage of current topics in general pharma- 
cology, biotransformation of drugs, molecular 
pharmacology, pharmacology of local and gen- 
eral anesthetics, and dental toxicology. 
DPHR 521. General Pharmacology and Thera- 
peutics (5) 



PHYSIOLOGY 

Chairman: Leslie C. Costello 
Professors: Costello, Kidder 
Associate Professors: Franklin, Myslinski 
Associate Clinical Professor: Buxbaum 
Assistant Professor: Bennett 
Assistant Research Professors: Hitzig, 

Urbaitus, Wilson 
Research Associate: Parente 

The Department of Physiology offers both un- 
dergraduate and graduate programs. The under- 
graduate course stresses the basic principles of 
physiology and provides the student with 
knowledge of the function of the principal or- 
gan systems of the body. Dentally-oriented as- 
pects of physiology are taught through depart- 
mental participation in the Conjoint Sciences 
program. The Department also presents courses 
for postgraduate students and offers graduate 
programs leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy for students 
interested in careers in teaching and research. 
DPHS 512. Principles of Physiology (5) 



30 




REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS 

Chairman: Robert J. Leupold 

Professors: Jerbi, Leupold, Ramsey, Reese 

Associate Professors: Fetchero, Stevens, 

Wagley 
Associate Clinical Professor: Mort 
Assistant Professors: Eastwood, Elias, Walters 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Grieco, 

Schwartz, Straube 
Instructor: Faraone 
Clinical Instructors: Attanasio, Boro, Fried, 

Hostetter, Marshall, McCarthy, Sachs, 

Weinman 
Associate Staff: Baier, King 

Removable prosthodontics concerns the art andj 
science involved in replacing lost dental and as] 
sociated structures by means of removable arti 
ficial appliances. These appliances are designeq 
and constructed to restore and maintain func- 
tion, appearance, speech, comfort, health and 
the self-image of the patient. The program of 
instruction is divided into three phases consist- 
ing of departmental participation in Basic Den- 
tal Science II, didactic instruction in the effec- 
tive management of clinical prosthodontic 
procedures, and clinical treatment of dental pa- 
tients under the guidance of staff members. 
REMV 538. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 
REMV 548. Removable Prosthodontics (8) 



THE DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM 



Faculty 



Chairman: Cheryl T. Metzger 

[Assistant Professors: Carr, Dudley, Everett, 

Metzger, Miller, Mulford, Singer 
Instructors: Parker, Rubinstein 
Clinical Instructors: Kauffman, Manuel 
Academic Advisors: Carr, Rubinstein 

\Note: Dental School faculty from other clinical 
Wjand basic science departments provide lectures 
Hand instructional assistance in clinic and class- 
room. 



General Information 

The Dental School offers a baccalaureate de- 
gree in dental hygiene. This degree can be 
earned in one of two educational programs: the 
/Preprofessional/Professional Program and the 
Postcertificate Program. The objective of both 
programs is to facilitate the students' acquisi- 
tion of knowledge and development of skills 
and attitudes so that they will be able to as- 
sume positions of responsibility in a variety of 
health care and educational settings. In addi- 
tion, these programs are designed to provide a 
foundation for graduate study in dental hygiene 
or related disciplines. 

The dental hygienist is an integral member of 
the health care team who strives to improve 
'oral health by providing preventive and educa- 
tional services to the public. Clinical dental hy- 
giene services may include assessing patients' 
health status, examining hard and soft tissues 
of the oral cavity and head and neck region, re- 
moving deposits and stains from teeth, expos- 
ing and developing dental x-rays, applying flu- 
orides and sealants, taking impressions for 
study models, and polishing amalgam restora- 
tions. 

Educational and management services for in- 
dividuals and/or groups may include nutritional 



and oral hygiene counseling; educational pro- 
grams for members of the dental health team; 
and community dental health program planning, 
implementation and evaluation. 



Employment Opportunities in Dental 
Hygiene 

Although the majority of dental hygienists 
are employed in private dental offices, there are 
opportunities for those with baccalaureate and 
graduate degrees in dental hygiene education; 
community, school and public health programs; 
private and public institutions; armed forces; 
research; and other special areas of practice. 

Current dental hygiene graduates, working 
full time, can anticipate initial annual income 
in the range of $14,000 to $16,000, depending 
on the area, responsibilities, type of practice 
and general economic conditions. 



Program Description 

Preprofessional/Professional Program. 

This program consists of two main parts: a 
two-year preprofessional curriculum at one of 
the three University of Maryland campuses 
(College Park, Baltimore County or Eastern 
Shore) or at another accredited college or uni- 
versity, and a two-year professional curriculum 
at the Dental School, University of Maryland at 
Baltimore. 



Two-Year Preprofessional Curriculum. A 

suggested sequence for the preprofessional cur- 
riculum follows. These courses provide a foun- 
dation in basic sciences, social sciences and 
general education. It is recommended that stu- 
dents meet with the dental hygiene advisor each 
semester to ensure appropriate course schedul- 
ing. 



31 







Preprofessional Curriculum 




Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year 


Credits 


1st 2nd 


1st 2nd 



English Composition 
*Inorganic Chemistry 
^Organic Chemistry 

General Zoology or Biology 

General Psychology 

General Sociology 

Public Speaking 
**Humanities 



Sem. 

3 



Sem, 



Total 14 



16 



*Human Anatomy & 

Physiology 
^Microbiology 
Principles of 
Nutrition 
***Social Science 
**Humanities 
Statistics 
Electives 



Sem. Sem. 

4 4 

4 



3 
3 

Total 14 



16 



*These courses must include a laboratory and meet the requirements for science majors. Survey 
or terminal courses for nonscience majors are not acceptable for transfer. 
**Humanities: Courses must be selected from at least three of the following areas: literature, phi- 
losophy, history, fine arts, speech, math or language. 
***Social Sciences: General psychology and sociology are required; the remaining six credits 
should be selected from courses in psychology, sociology, government and politics , or anthro- 
pology. 




32 



Two-Year Professional Curriculum. The 

professional curriculum includes clinical and di- 
dactic courses in the Dental School. Through- 
out these two years, dental hygiene students 
work concurrently with dental students to pro- 
vide patient care. 

During the first year, students expand upon 
their preprofessional basic science knowledge 
as it pertains to dental hygiene practice. In a 
clinical setting, the students begin to develop 
the skills, knowledge and judgment necessary 
to collect data for patient treatment; assess each 
patient's oral health status; and select and pro- 
vide preventive and educational services, based 
on the individual needs of the patient. 



During the second year, students demonstrate 
increasing proficiency and self-direction in the 
assessment of patients' oral health status, the 
planning and provision of preventive services, 
and the identification of the need for consulta- 
tion and referral. To enrich their educational 
experiences, students provide educational and/ 
or clinical services in a variety of community 
settings, such as hospitals; schools; and facili- 
ties for the handicapped, chronically ill, and 
aged. Senior students also take courses in edu- 
cation and management which enable them to 
develop fundamental skills that are necessary 
for various career options within the profession. 



Professional Curriculum 



Junior Year 


Credits 


Senior Year 


Credits 




1st 


2nd 




1st 


2nd 




Sem. 


Sem. 




Sem. 


Sem. 


DHYG 311 






DHY411 






Prevention and Control 






Advanced Clinical 






of Oral Disease I 


9 




Practice I 
DHYG 412 


5 




DHYG 312 






Perspectives of Dental 






Oral Biology 


8 




Hygiene Practice I 


3 




DHYG 313 

Health Education Strategies 


2 




DHYG 413 

Community Service I 

DHYG 414 


1 




DHYG 321 
Prevention and Control 






Educational Program 
Development 


3 




of Oral Diseases II 




8 


DHYG 415 

Health Care Manage- 






DHYG 322 






ment 


3 




Patients and the 






DHYG 421 






Community 




3 


Advanced Clinical 
Practice II 




4 


DHYG 323 






DHYG 422 






Principles of Dental 






Perspectives of Dental 






Hygiene Practice 




2 


Hygiene Practice II 




2 


DHYG 324 
Methods and Materials 






DHYG 423 
Community Service II 




1 


in Dentistry 




3 


DHYG 424 

Special Topics 




2 


DPHR 325 






DHYG 425 






General Pharmacology 






Issues in Health Care 






& Therapeutics 




3 


Delivery 




3 


Total 

1 


19 


19 




Total 15 


12 



33 



Admission and Application 
Procedures 

High School Students. High school students 
who wish to enroll in the preprofessional cur- 
riculum should request applications directly 
from the Admissions Office of the University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742; 
the University of Maryland Baltimore County, 
5401 Wilkens Avenue, Catonsville, Maryland 
21228; or the University of Maryland Eastern 
Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 21853; or any 
accredited college or university. 

It is recommended that those preparing for a 
baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene pursue 
an academic program in high school which in- 
cludes courses in biology, chemistry, algebra 
and social sciences. 

Preprofessional College Students. Stu- 
dents enrolled in the preprofessional curriculum 
should communicate regularly with the dental 
hygiene advisor at the Dental School to ensure 
that the courses selected satisfy the degree re- 
quirements. After completion of two semesters 
of the preprofessional curriculum, students may 
request an application from the Director of Ad- 
missions and Registrations, Room 132, Howard 
Hall, University of Maryland at Baltimore, 660 
West Redwood Street, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201; or from the dental hygiene advisor. Ap- 
plications for the Baltimore campus should be 
received no later than February 1 prior to the 
fall semester for which the student wishes to 
enroll. 

All applicants are required to take the Allied 
Health Professions Admissions Test (AHPAT) 



in November or January prior to the fall semes- 
ter for which the student anticipates enrollment 
Information concerning the AHPAT is availablt 
from the dental hygiene advisor on the College 
Park and Baltimore County campuses or from 
the Department of Dental Hygiene on the Balti 
more campus. 

A minimum grade point average of 2.3 in tht 
preprofessional curriculum is recommended and 
preference will be given to those students who 
have high scholastic averages, especially in the 
science area. 

Enrollment at another University of Mary- 
land campus or completion of the preprofes- 
sional curriculum does not guarantee admission 
to the professional curriculum at the Dental 
School. Enrollment in the dental hygiene pro- 
gram is limited. 

Students who are offered admission will be 
required to send a deposit of $100 with a letter 
of intent to enroll. This deposit will be credited 
toward tuition at registration, but will not be 
refunded in the event of failure to enroll. 



Student Expenses 

To assist students with their financial planning, 
the following listing is provided as an approxi- 
mation of average expenditures by students 
who will be enrolled in 1982-83. Students who 
will not be living at home or in University 
housing should allow additional funds for lodg- 
ing. These estimates do not include food, trave 
and personal expenses. 

Field experience in both the junior and senioj 
years may add additional costs for travel and/oi 
meals at sites outside the Dental School. 




Approximate Average Expenditures 1982-83 



Tuition 

In-State 

Out-of-State 

Dormitory, double occupancy 

Instruments/Supplies 

Uniforms and Shoes 

Textbooks 

Health Insurance (one person) 

Miscellaneous fees: 

application, graduation, dues, 

instructional resources, supporting 

facilities, student health and 

malpractice 172.50 

TOTALS 

In-State $3,846.74 

Out-of-State 6,008.74 

*1981-82 fee 



Junior Year 


Senior Year 


$ 957.00 


$ 957.00 


3,119.00 


3,119.00 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


700.00 


100.00 


35.00 





260.00 


90.00 


222.24 


222.24* 



172.50 



$3,041.74 
5,203.74 



Graduation Requirements 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree 
n dental hygiene must complete the preprofes- 
sional and the professional curricula as out- 
ined. A cumulative grade point average of 2.0 
js required for graduation. Students must com- 
plete a total of 125 credits and will be awarded 
i Bachelor of Science degree by the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, Uni- 
/ersity of Maryland at Baltimore. 



National and Regional Board 
Examinations 

Clinical and comprehensive written examina- 
ions are given in the spring of the senior year. 
Successful completion of these exams is neces- 
ary to obtain a license to practice dental hy- 
giene . 



Course Descriptions 

1HYG 311. Prevention and Control of Oral 
isease I (9). The study of the morphologic 
characteristics and physiologic relationships of 
eeth and supporting structures; and the basic 
bundation for clinical dental hygiene practice 
re presented in lectures, class discussions and 
ludiovisual presentations. Laboratory and clini 
;al experiences provide the opportunity for 



practical application of the principles and pro- 
cedures for the identification, prevention and 
control of oral diseases. 

DHYG 312. Oral Biology (8). The study of 
embryology and histology; anatomy and physi- 
ology; microbiology; pathology with emphasis 
on the head, neck and oral cavity; and the ba- 
sic principles of radiology are presented in lec- 
ture, laboratory and audiovisual format. 

DHYG 313. Health Education Strategies (2). 
The study of the elements of human behavior, 
principles of learning, methods of teaching and 
principles of communication as they relate to 
teaching oral health care to individuals and 
groups. Classroom discussions, small group ac- 
tivities and clinical experiences provide the op- 
portunity for application of these topics. 

DHYG 321. Prevention and Control of Oral 
Diseases II (8). The study of principles and 
procedures for the prevention of oral disease in- 
cluding dental health education, oral hygiene 
measures, dietary control of dental disease, use 
of fluorides, sealants and the oral prophylaxis; 
and continued study of the etiology and control 
of periodontal disease and oral pathology are 
provided through class discussion and audiovi- 
sual and clinical experiences. Students work 
closely with dental students to simulate the 
postgraduation team delivery of dental care. 



35 




DHYG 322. Patients and the Community (3). 
The principles of community or dental public 
health, including social, economic and political 
factors affecting dentistry and the responsibili- 
ties of dental professionals in the community 
are presented in lecture and seminar format. 
Students participate in a variety of community 
health activities with various population groups, 
such as physically and mentally handicapped, 
elderly persons and school children. 

DHYG 323. Principles of Dental Hygiene Prac- 
tice (2). Group discussions and guest lecturers 
provide a forum through which the student may 
develop a philosophy for the total care and 
management of the special patient, that is, pa- 
tients for whom routine dental care may be 
complicated by age or unusual health factors. 
The students become actively involved in pro- 
fessional experiences which enhance their 
growth and development as knowledgeable and 
involved health professionals. 

DHYG 324. Methods and Materials in Dentis- 
try (3). An introduction to the science of dental 
materials, including the composition and utili- 
zation of dental materials as they apply to clini- 
cal dental hygiene procedures, dental assisting 
and patient education, is presented in lecture, 
class discussion and laboratory format. 



36 



DPHR 325. General Pharmacology and Oral 
Therapeutics (3). The study of drugs and their 
use in the treatment, diagnosis and prevention 
of disease; the absorption, distribution, metabo- 
lism, excretion and mechanism of action of 
drugs; and drug interactions, rationale for use, 
indications and contraindications are presented 
in lecture and class discussion format. Empha- 
sis is placed on the relevance of this informa- 
tion to providing patient care. 

DHYG 411-421. Advanced Clinical Practice I 
and II (5-4). Clinical experiences in principles 
and procedures of dental hygiene practice are 
provided in simulated general dentistry settings 
through a concurrent patient treatment program 
with dental students. Students have the oppor- 
tunity to experience and participate in alterna- 
tive practice settings through block assignments 
to dental specialty clinics within the School. 

DHYG 412. Perspectives of Dental Hygiene 
Practice I (3). This course provides the oppor- 
tunity for senior students to explore advanced 
principles and skills of dental hygiene practice. 
The primary focus of the course is divided into 
three major units: Pain Control, Advanced 
Periodontics, and Myo-Oral Facial Pain. Also 
included in the course is an introduction to 
intra-oral photography and case documentation. 



The emphasis of this course is to broaden the 
student's perspective of dental hygiene practice 
as it exists across the country. 

DHYG 422. Perspectives of Dental Hygiene 
Practice II (2). This course provides an appli- 
cation of principles and concepts for the plan- 
ning and development of the student's profes- 
sional satisfaction and security. To prepare 
students for the challenge of professional career 
development, such issues as career planning, 
continuing education, dental hygiene business 
practices and professional organizations are in- 
cluded. 

DHYG 413-423. Community Service I and II 
(1-1). The externship program provides oppor- 
tunity for senior students to select experiences 
beyond those given within the Dental School 
setting. The selection of the community site is 
based on the student's interests and career 
goals. Sites include well-baby clinics, prenatal 
clinics, community health centers, nursing 
homes, senior citizen centers, facilities for the 
handicapped, hospitals, military clinics and 
schools, day care centers, public health depart- 
ment, and research centers. 



DHYG 414. Educational Program Development 
(3). This course provides the student with the 
opportunity to explore various ways in which 
effective instructional skills may contribute to a 
career in dental hygiene. Learning experiences 
|| are designed to enable the student to develop 
these skills and to project their application in 
such areas as public school systems, commu- 
nity health programs, higher education, and 
consumer education. 

DHYG 415. Health Care Management (3). By 
means of lecture, discussion and small group 
activities, students are introduced to skills es- 
sential for effective health care management. 
Areas of emphasis include women in manage- 
ment, managerial planning and decision mak- 
ing, fiscal control, and grantsmanship. Applica- 
tion of management principles are made to 
dental and other health care delivery settings. 

DHYG 424. Special Topics (2). This course 
provides an opportunity for the student to pur- 
sue in depth topics of special interest. The pro- 
gram of study is designed by each student and 
approved by faculty prior to the beginning of 
the course. The study program may relate to an 
area of interest in clinical dental hygiene, edu- 
cation, management, or research and may con- 
sist of special reading assignments, reports, 
conferences, and possibly clinic, laboratory or 
extramural experience. 



DHYG 425. Issues in Health Care Delivery (3). 
By means of lecture, discussion and small 
group activities, students examine and analyze 
the issues that impact on the broad spectrum of 
health care delivery. Topics of interest include 
inequities in health care delivery, delivery sys- 
tems in other countries, the profiteering in 
health care delivery, and professional rivalry. 

The Postcertificate Program 

The postcertificate program provides the oppor- 
tunity for registered dental hygienists who hold 
a certificate or associate degree to pursue stud- 
ies leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Dental Hygiene. The curriculum is designed in 
two phases of full- or part-time study to meet 
each individual's unique academic, clinical and 
career interests. 

Phase I: General Requirements. General 
course requirements for the baccalaureate de- 
gree may be taken at any one of the three Uni- 
versity of Maryland campuses (College Park, 
Baltimore County or Eastern Shore) or at an- 
other accredited college or university. The 
courses are listed in the Preprofessional Pro- 
gram, freshman and sophomore years. 

Phase II: Postcertificate Requirements. 

The Postcertificate Program at the Dental 
School consists of two core seminars totaling 4 
credit hours; senior level didactic courses, to- 
taling 14 credit hours (DHYG 412, 414, 415, 
424, 425); and 12 credit hours of academic 
electives, taken at another campus. 




37 




Curriculum Planning 

Registered dental hygienists should submit tran- 
scripts from their dental hygiene program and 
all other colleges or universities attended to the 
Postcertificate Program advisor for evaluation 
of transfer credits and an outline of remaining 
requirements. Students should meet regularly 
with the advisor to ensure appropriate course 
scheduling in Phase I. 



Admission and Application 
Procedures 

In addition to meeting the general course re- 
quirements, the student applying for admission 
to the Postcertificate Program at the Dental 
School must: 

1) be a graduate of a two-year accredited 
dental hygiene program. 

2) have completed a minimum of one year of 
clinical practice as a dental hygienist. 

3) be licensed or eligible for licensure in the 
State of Maryland. 

Applications for admission may be obtained 
from the Director of Admissions and Registra- 
tions, Room 132, Howard Hall, University of 
Maryland at Baltimore, 660 W. Redwood 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. Applica- 
tions must be received no later than February 1 
prior to the fall semester for which the student 
wishes to enroll. 



Enrollment at another University of Mary- 
land campus does not guarantee admission to 
the Postcertificate Program at the Dental 
School. Enrollment in the Postcertificate Pro- 
gram is limited. 

Students who are offered admission will be 
required to send a deposit of $100 with a letter 
of intent to enroll. This deposit will be credited 
toward tuition at registration, but will not be 
refunded in the event of failure to enroll. 



Student Expenses 

Approximate average expenditures are listed on 
page 35. The amount given for instruments/ 
supplies; uniforms and shoes; and textbooks are 
not applicable for postcertificate students. Costs 
in these categories would be considerably 
lower, with minimal expenses for instruments/ 
supplies. 



Graduation Requirements 

One hundred twenty-five (125) semester credit 
hours are required for the Bachelor of Science 
degree in dental hygiene. The last 30 credit 
hours toward the baccalaureate degree must be 
taken at the University of Maryland. Courses 
not offered at the Dental School will be taken 
at another University of Maryland campus. 



Course Descriptions 

DHYG 410-420. Seminar in Dental Hygiene (3- 
1) (Postcertificate only). Reinforcement, updat- 
ing, and expansion of dental hygiene profes- 
sional skills, knowledge and attitudes. Topic 
areas which are explored through seminar, lab- 
oratory and extramural formats include dental 
public health, preventive dentistry, interper- 
sonal communication, research design, and op- 
tions for dental hygiene practice. 

DHYG 418-428. Dental Hygiene Practicum (1- 
3/1-3)*. Didactic and clinical education in a 
special area of dental hygiene clinical practice, 
teaching, community dental health, or research. 

^Elective variable credit course that requires 
approval of department chairman. 



38 



ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAMS 




Graduate Education 

Graduate programs leading to the Master of 
Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy 
(Ph.D.) degrees are offered by the Departments 
of Anatomy, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Oral 
Pathology and Physiology. A Master of Sci- 
ence degree is offered by the Department of 
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and is described 
under Advanced Specialty Education. 

Programs are also available for those who 
wish to pursue a graduate degree in one of the 
basic sciences concurrently with clinic specialty 
education. The combined degree/specialty train- 
ing program generally requires three years for 
the Master's degree and five years for the Doc- 
tor of Philosophy degree. These programs are 
highly individualized and are developed appro- 
priate to the needs of the candidate. 



A Master of Science of Oral Biology pro- 
gram is available for graduate students who are 
enrolled in the certificate programs in the Den- 
tal School. The program is a multidisciplinary 
one, in that the graduate courses necessary to 
satisfy the Graduate School's requirements for 
the Master's degree will be selected from the 
various departments of the University. Students 
will receive training under the supervision and 
direction of a member of the Graduate Faculty. 
Courses in education have been added to vari- 
ous tracks equipping students to become more 
effective teachers of their specialties. 

The Baltimore campus Graduate School Bul- 
letin and application for admission may be ob- 
tained from the Office of the Dean for Gradu- 
ate and Interprofessional Studies and Research, 
University of Maryland at Baltimore, 624 West 
Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 

Advanced Specialty Education 

Assistant Dean for Advanced Specialty' Educa- 
tion: Wilbur O. Ramsey 

Postdoctoral programs are offered in the fol- 
lowing recognized dental specialties: endodon- 
tics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, oral pathol- 
ogy, orthodontics, pedodontics, periodontics, 
and prosthodontics. 

The program in oral and maxillofacial sur- 
gery is of thirty-six months' duration; a Master 
of Science degree is offered as an option. All 
other clinical programs, however, provide an 
opportunity for those candidates who plan ca- 
reers in teaching and research to matriculate in 
a combined Certificate/Degree program of 
thirty-six months' duration. All programs begin 
each year on July 1 . Candidates successfully 
completing twenty-four-month programs are 
awarded a certificate by the Dental School. 
Those candidates successfully completing 
thirty-six-month programs are awarded a certifi- 
cate by the Dental School and the degree, Mas- 
ter of Science in Oral Biology, by the Graduate 



39 



School, University of Maryland at Baltimore. 

Further, there are twelve-month programs in 
general practice that provide advanced training 
in clinical dentistry. The General Practice Resi- 
dency Program at the University of Maryland 
Hospital is designed to improve and refine the 
resident's knowledge and clinical skills in the 
practice of general dentistry, and provide the 
background to permit the resident to practice 
general dentistry with reduced dependency 
upon specialists, minimizing patient referral. It 
prepares the resident to assess the patient's gen- 
eral medical status and relate this status to an- 
ticipated dental treatment. Instruction also is 
provided in the organization, operation and 
services of the various hospital departments. 

The Advanced General Dentistry Program, 
based in the Dental School, also is designed to 
meet the needs of graduates desirous of enhanc- 
ing their skills as general practitioners. Semi- 
nars in the various clinical specialties, as well 
as behavioral science and applied basic sci- 
ences, reinforce the clinical experience which is 
a simulated group practice involving the treat- 
ment of patients with a variety of dental needs 
by students and attending staff. Also incorpora- 
ted into this program are experiences in man- 
agement of office personnel and auxiliaries, 
quality assessments, business and financial 
management, and professional practice develop- 
ment. 

Applicants for all programs must have a 
D.D.S. orD.M.D. degree or its equivalent and 
must give evidence of high scholastic achieve- 
ment. A brochure describing all specialty pro- 
grams may be obtained from the Assistant 
Dean for Advanced Specialty Education. 

For tuition and fee schedules and application 
requests, contact the Assistant Dean for Ad- 
vanced Specialty Education, 666 W. Baltimore 
Street, Baltimore. Maryland 21201. 

Facilities 

All programs operate in a modernly equipped 
clinic of the Dental School in an area apart 
from the predoctoral clinic, except the program 
in oral and maxillofacial surgery and the Gen- 
eral Practice Residency Program, which are 
housed in the University of Maryland Hospital, 
a large, metropolitan teaching hospital adjacent 
to the Dental School. Each student is provided 
an individual operatory, and each program pro- 
vides a conference room for its students and 
maintains appropriate laboratory and research 
facilities. Further, research facilities and assist- 
ance are provided by the biological science de- 
partments of the Dental School. 



Affiliated Institutions 

In addition to campus resources (the Dental 
School, the Graduate School, the School of 
Medicine and the University of Maryland Hos- 
pital), Advanced Specialty Education programs 
maintain active didactic and clinical affiliations 
with numerous regional institutions. Significant 
among these are the John F. Kennedy Institute 
(an affiliate of The Johns Hopkins University); 
the Maryland School for the Blind; Mercy Hos- 
pital; the National Naval Medical Center, 
Bethesda, Maryland; Kernan Hospital, Balti- 
more, Maryland; the Office of the Medical Ex- 
aminer, City of Baltimore; and the H.K. 
Cooper Institute, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Stu- 
dents in the oral and maxillofacial surgery pro- 
gram also serve a one month's residency in the 
Seguro Social De Peru, Hospital Central #2, 
Lima, Peru, South America. 



Curriculum 



All postdoctoral programs conform to require- 
ments and guidelines for advanced specialty ed- 
ucation programs developed by the Commissioi 
on Accreditation (Council on Dental Education) 
of the American Dental Association. The cur- 
riculum of each program is structured to meet 
accreditation guidelines and to meet special re- 
quirements of individual students. All pro- 
grams, however, reflect a curriculum structure 
which integrates: 

• selected course work in advanced biological 
sciences under the aegis of the Graduate 
School, University of Maryland at Baltimore: 

• extensive experience in specialized clinical 
procedures under the direction of the pro- 
gram staff and in appropriate affiliated insti- 
tutions; 

• a comprehensive background in the literature 
and state of the art of the clinical discipline: 

• selected course work in related clinical, so- 
cial and behavioral disciplines; 

• a strong research component; 

• a teaching component of a didactic and ap- 
plied nature. 

The educational experience is designed to 
prepare students for comprehensive practice in 
a specialized discipline, with integration of re- 
lated disciplines; to prepare students for exami- 
nation by appropriate examining boards for spe- 
cialty practice; and to provide a foundation for 
careers in research and teaching. 



40 




Continuing Dental Education 
Program 

Associate Dean for Continuing Dental Educa- 
ion: Robert W. Haroth 

The Dental School conducts a formalized pro- 
gram of continuing education that provides 
structured educational experiences beyond basic 
^reparation for the profession. It includes edu- 
:ational activities that update, refresh and rein- 
force the professional knowledge and skill of 
:he practitioner. An average of sixty courses of 
Dne or more days' duration are made available 
luring each academic year for dentists and den- 
ial auxiliaries. The clinical, biological, social 
and behavioral sciences related to practice are 
included in the course offerings. The courses 
^re conducted by the School's faculty, visiting 
faculty and distinguished practitioners from all 
(sections of the country. The courses are not in- 
:ended as collegiate credit courses; however, 

I 



the Continuing Education Unit (CEU), which 
equals ten clock hours of formal instruction, is 
a measurement used to verify attendance and 
participation in these activities. 

Clinical and laboratory facilities and a spa- 
cious classroom specifically designed and 
equipped for the Continuing Education Program 
have been made available for courses held at 
the School. Off-campus courses are also pro- 
vided for practitioners located in rural areas of 
the state. 

A significant number of the on-campus 
courses are laboratory or clinical participating 
courses. The availability of faculty expertise 
and facilities of a university-based continuing 
education program offers many advantages to 
the practitioners. 

Students and faculty are invited and encour- 
aged to attend continuing education courses 
with waiver of tuition, on a space-available ba- 
sis, subject to a registration fee to cover the ad- 
ministrative expenses incidental to the course. 



41 



STUDENT LIFE 



t 



Office of Student Affairs 

The Office of Student Affairs is either directly 
or indirectly involved with all aspects of stu- 
dent life and welfare at the Dental School. Pri- 
mary areas of responsibility include academic, 
personal and career counseling; financial aid; 
and advisory services. 

Students who experience financial, health, le- 
gal, employment, housing and other personal 
problems are counseled by the Assistant Dean 
for Student Affairs and referred, as necessary, 
to the appropriate campus agency or office. In 
addition, counseling concerning specialty train- 
ing, military service, internships, dental educa- 
tion and dental research careers is available to 
undergraduate dental students. 

The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs serves 
as advisor to all student organizations and 
publications; he also assists in the coordination 
of joint student-faculty professional, social and 
cultural programs, for which the Student Af- 
fairs Committee of the Faculty Council has the 
major responsibility. 

The Office of Student Affairs maintains di- 
rect liaison with administrators as well as cam- 
pus, community and professional organizations 
and agencies for the effective conduct of all 
student affairs. 

Office of Academic Affairs 

The Office of Academic Affairs is the source 
of student information concerning the academic 
program and the repository for records of stu- 
dent academic performance. The policy of the 
University of Maryland regarding access to and 
release of student data/information may be 
found in the current UMAB campus informa- 
tion guide issued to all incoming students. 

A major function of the Office is coordinat- 
ing the academic counseling and guidance pro- 
grams of the School. Departmental academic 
counseling and progress reports are maintained 



K 



and monitored. Records concerning counseling, 
referrals and disposition are maintained and 
serve as a resource to the faculty and adminis- 
tration for purposes of academic evaluation. 

Textbook lists, course schedules, examination!' 
schedules and the academic calendar are dis- 
seminated through this Office. Program infor- 
mation distributed to students includes handouts L 
concerning the grading system, course credits, 
and guidelines for the selection of students for 
clerkship programs. 

Official class rosters and student personal 
data and address files are maintained by the Of-f < 
fice of Academic Affairs, which serves as a 
aison between the Dental School and the Direc-fe 
tor of Admissions and Registrations of the 
University for the coordination of registration 
procedures. 

The Office is also responsible for coordina- 
tion of a computerized grading system which 
(a) provides each Advancement Committee 
with a composite report on all students in the 
class at the end of each semester; (b) generates 
an individual grade report at the end of the firs 
semester to advise the student of his progress; 
and (c) provides a final grade report for the ac- 
ademic year to both the student and the Univer- 
sity's Office of Admissions and Registrations, 
which maintains the student's permanent record 
and issues the official transcript. 

The Office of Academic Affairs, which is 
under the direction of the Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs, provides assistance to both 
students and faculty in matters relating to the 
academic program. 

Office of Clinical Affairs 



All intramural and extramural clinical programs 
of the Dental School are coordinated by the Of- 
fice of Clinical Affairs. Major functions of this 
Office include scheduling faculty from the vari- 
ous disciplines to each clinic module; schedul- 
ing the rotation of students to special assign- 
ments; assigning patients to students; 



42 



naintaining patient records; and maintaining 
he records of clinical performance of students, 
n addition, the Associate Dean for Clinical Af- 
airs, the Director of Undergraduate Clinics, 
nd their staff provide assistance to students 
nd patients who encounter difficulty. More 
han 120,000 patient visits are provided annu- 
ity in the clinics of the Dental School. The 
•ersonnel, supplies, equipment and collection 
•f fees associated with the operation of the 
caching clinics are additional responsibilities 
oordinated through this Office. 

Campus Health Service 

'he School provides medical care for its stu- 
ents through the Campus Health Service, lo- 
ated on the first floor of Howard Hall, 685 

West Baltimore Street. The office is staffed by 
physician director and assistant director; phy- 
icians in internal medicine, psychiatry and 

gynecology; a psychologist; nurse practitioners, 
nd registered nurses. 

lousing 

'he University of Maryland at Baltimore is 
redominantly a commuter campus. Most stu- 
ents locate housing in Baltimore or commute 




from their homes elsewhere in the state. Lim- 
ited on-campus accommodations are available 
at the Student Union and Parsons Hall Resi- 
dence for Women for full-time single students 
during the academic year. 

During the summer months, rooms in the 
Student Union are offered on a space-available 
basis to students, faculty and staff who are af- 
filiated with the UMAB campus. The residence 
hall rooms are supplied with basic furnishings: 
desk, chair, bed, desk lamp and dresser. No 
private baths, televisions, or air-conditioning 
are available in the rooms. Application forms 
for housing may be obtained by writing to: 
Director of Housing, 621 W. Lombard Street, 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201, and submitting a 
$2.50 non-refundable application fee. 

Athletic Facilities 

The campus has a single-floor recreation area 
located atop the Pratt Street Garage. It is 
equipped with two squash courts, two 
racquetball/handball courts, and two basketball 
courts which may also be used for tennis, bad- 
minton and volleyball. In addition, there is a 
weight room equipped with a fifteen-station 
Universal Gym and a sauna in each locker 
room. 

Facilities are available for use by UMAB stu- 
dents, faculty, staff and alumni. UMAB stu- 
dents with a current and valid I.D. are admitted 
free. Faculty and staff members desiring use of 
the gym are assessed a $25.00 per academic 
year membership fee. For additional informa- 
tion, contact the athletic manager at 528-3902. 

The Student Union 

The Student Union is a cultural and social cen- 
ter for students, faculty, staff, alumni and 
guests. Activities and services of the Union in- 
clude meetings, dances, receptions, movies, 
and other forms of indoor activity. 

The Synapse, located in the lower level, of- 
fers food and drinks. Entertainment by a local 
disc jockey, free films and live music are pro- 
vided on occasion. 

The Student Union Cafeteria offers food 
service on a pay-as-you-go basis. The cafeteria 
also offers catering service, from simple re- 
freshments to complete banquet meals. Four 
conference rooms are available to accommodate 
groups from 12 to 200 in size. 

The Student Union provides many special 
services for members of the university commu- 
nity: bulletin boards, check cashing, photo- 
copying machines, telephones, game room. 



43 




publicity rack, ticket service for University of 
Maryland College Park athletic events, food- 
vending machines, ride board, potpourri of 
special functions, as well as on-campus 
housing information. 

Publications 

Dental School and campus publications include 
the semi-annual Dental Newsletter, with articles 
concerning dental education at the School; 
Happenings, published bi-monthly; and Focus 
published three times annually, to report events 
and news of interest to alumni, faculty and 
friends of the UMAB campus. These publica- 
tions are distributed free of charge. 

In addition, a yearbook, The MIRROR, is 
published annually by student editors and staff; 
and each year the Student Dental Association 
compiles and distributes a Student Directory. 

Organizations 

The University of Maryland Student Dental As- 
sociation. The University of Maryland Student 
Dental Association is the organizational struc- 
ture of the student body. It is presided over and 
governed by elected representatives from each 
class and is represented on appropriate commit- 
tees of the Faculty Council. The organization 



44 



participates in certain student-faculty activities 
and sponsors and directs all student social ac- 
tivities. The UMSDA is responsible for the 
publication of the School's yearbook, Tlie MIR 
ROR, and is unique among dental student orga 
nizations in having formulated its own constitu 
tion and code of ethics. 



American Student Dental Association. With the! 1{ 
aid of the American Dental Association 
(ADA), this organization (ASDA) was estab- 
lished in February, 1971. Its primary purposes 
are to secure scholarships and loans and to as- 
sist in other student-related affairs. Included in 
the ASDA membership is a subscription to the 
ADA Journal. 



■' 



. 

Student American Dental Hygienists ' Associa- 
tion. Members of the Student American Dental 
Hygienists' Association (SADHA) are involvec 
in activities such as hosting guest speakers, 
conducting fund-raising projects, presenting ta- | 
ble clinics, and maintaining liaison with the 
state and local organizations. They also partici 
pate in meetings and discussion groups on a re 
gional and national level. Student representa- 
tives attend the annual meeting of the America; tie 
Dental Hygienists' Association. 



Student National Dental Association. The 
Maryland Chapter of the Student National Den- 
al Association was founded in 1973. The pri- 
nary objective of this organization is to foster 
he admission, development and graduation of 
31ack dental and dental hygiene students. 
\mong the activities in which the Maryland 
Chapter is engaged are minority recruitment, 
utoring, social and professional programs, and 
immunity and university relations. 

American Association of Dental Schools. The 
\ssociation's objective is to promote the ad- 
/ancement of dental education, research and 
;ervice in all appropriately accredited institu- 
ions that offer programs for dental personnel. 
The Association has three membership catego- 
ies: individual, student and honorary. Student 
nembers receive the Journal of Dental Educa- 
tion and the Dental Student News, published by 
*he Association. During the year the local chap- 
er conducts programs to promote the goals of 
his organization. One Dental School represent- 
ative each from the dental, dental hygiene and 
)Ostdoctoral student membership is elected to 
;erve on the Council of Students of the Ameri- 
:an Association of Dental Schools (AADS). 

lamma Pi Delta. Chartered in 1965, Gamma 
I Delta is an honorary student dental organiza- 
ion with scholarship and interest in the field of 
>rosthetic dentistry as a basis for admission, 
"he objective of the organization is the ad- 
vancement of prosthetic dentistry through lec- 
tures, table clinics and other academic activities 
Vhich will stimulate the creative interest of stu- 
lents and the profession in general. 

iiorgas Odontological Society. The Gorgas 
Odontological Society was organized in 1916 
1 an honorary student dental society with 
cholarship as a basis for admission. The Soci- 
ety was named after Dr. Ferdinand J. S. 
gorgas. a pioneer in dental education, a teacher 
}f many years' experience and a major contrib- 
utor to dental literature. It was with the idea of 
erpetuating his name that the Society adopted 



To be eligible for membership a student must 
ank in the highest 30 percent of his class, 
peakers prominent in the dental and medical 
ields are invited to address members at 
lonthly meetings. An effort is made to obtain 
peakers not affiliated with the University. 

micron Kappa Upsilon. Phi Chapter of Omi- 
ron Kappa Upsilon. national honorary dental 
Dciety, was chartered at the Baltimore College 
f Dental Surgery, Dental School. University 



of Maryland during the 1928-1929 academic 
year. Students whose rank for the entire course 
of study is among the highest 20 percent of the 
class are eligible. This high honor is conferred 
upon those seniors who. in addition to scholar- 
ship, have demonstrated exemplary character 
traits and potential for future professional 
growth and attainment. 

Academy of General Dentistry. This organiza- 
tion is open to all students in the Dental 
School. General dentists with extraordinary ex- 
periences to share present lecture-discussion 
programs which are interesting to all. Meetings 
are held several times a year after school hours. 

American Society of Dentistry for Children. 
This organization meets once a month and uses 
a lecture-discussion format to discuss subjects 
as varied as nutrition for children to N : in pri- 
vate practice. All students are welcome to join 
the ASDC. 

Big Brother/Sister Program. This is a voluntary 
effort on the part of each member of the sopho- 
more class to help and advise a member of the 
incoming freshman class. It is hoped that this 
assistance will continue through graduation of 
each class. The program has been made an of- 
ficial standing committee of the SDA. 

Dental Hygiene Big Brother/Sister Program. 
This is a voluntary effort on the part of each 
member of the senior class to help and advise a 
member of the junior class. It is hoped that this 
assistance will continue through graduation of 
each class. 

Professional Dental Fraternities. The profes- 
sional dental fraternity is a Greek letter organi- 
zation of men and women bonded together by 
ritual. It is a specialized fraternity which limits 
its membership to selected graduates and stu- 
dents enrolled and satisfactorily pursuing 
courses in an accredited college of dentistry. It 
is not an honorary fraternity or recognition so- 
ciety which confers membership to recognize 
outstanding scholarship. 

Its aim is to promote the high ideals and 
standards of its profession, advance the profes- 
sional knowledge and welfare of its members, 
and provide a medium through which its mem- 
bers, with a common interest, can develop 
everlasting friendships. 

To do this, the professional dental fraternity 
follows a pattern in the selection and training 
of its members that stresses the importance of 
high professional ethics and practices; fosters 
athletic and social functions that stimulate the 
development of life-long friendships: conducts 



45 




Dentistry 



k 



an extensive program of speakers, tours, fo- 
rums and research projects that are designed to 
broaden the professional knowledge of its 
members; and grants scholarships and awards 
that encourage professional proficiency and 
provide a service to its college and community. 
It complements the curriculum of the college 
and provides the cultural and social graces to 
round out the whole person. 

The following professional dental fraternities 
constitute the American Dental Interfraternity 
Council and have over 140 undergraduate chap- 
ters on campuses of the dental schools in this 
country: Alpha Omega, founded in 1907; Delta 
Sigma Delta, founded in 1882; Xi Psi Phi, 
founded in 1889; and Psi Omega, founded in 
1892. These fraternities have more than 150 ac- 
tive alumni chapters scattered throughout the 
world. Eighty-five percent of those active in 
the dental profession have fraternity affiliation. 

Awards 

Awards are presented to senior students at 
graduation to recognize the following achieve- 
ments and qualities: 



46 



—highest scholastic average 

—grade point average among the ten highest 

in the class 
—highest average in basic biologic sciences 
—highest average in basic dental science 
—ethical standards, kindness and humanitar- 

ianism 
—professional demeanor 
—devotion to the School and the profession 
—characteristics of an outstanding general 

practitioner 
—the most professional growth and develop- 
ment 
—conscientious and enthusiastic devotion to 

clinical practice 
—high proficiency in clinical care and patien 

management 
—greatest proficiency in oral and maxillofa 

cial surgery 
—excellence in fixed partial prosthesis 
—excellence in complete oral operative restoL 

ration 
—excellence in practical set of full upper anc 

lower dentures 
—outstanding senior thesis/table clinic 
—achievement, proficiency and/or potential 

in each of the following specialty areas: 
—anatomy 
—anesthesiology 
—dentistry for children 
—dental radiology 
—endodontics 
—gold foil operation 
—operative dentistry 
—oral medicine 
—oral pathology 
—oral and maxillofacial surgery 
—orthodontics 
— periodontology 



Dental Hygiene 



—highest scholastic average 

—grade point average among the five highesjjj 
in the class 

— humanitarianism, ethical standards and de- 
votion to the profession 

— interest in and potential for active partici- 
pation in professional organizations 

— interest and participation in the Student 
American Dental Hygienists' Association 

—outstanding clinical performance 
—outstanding leadership and participation in 
community activities and student and pro- 
fessional organizations 



;:. 



(VDMINISTRATION 



The University of Maryland 
at Baltimore 

Dental School 

\dministrative Officers 

\)ean 

Errol L. Reese, B.S., Fairmont State College, 
.960; D.D.S., West Virginia University. 1963; 
4.S., University of Detroit. 1968. 

Associate Dean 

Warren M. Morganstein, B.S., University of 
vlaryland, 1966; D.D.S., 1969; M.P.H., The 
ohns Hopkins University, 1975. 

issociate Dean for Academic Affairs 
Ernest F. Moreland, B.S., University of Geor- 
gia, 1960; M.A.. Western Carolina University, 
962; Ed. D., Indiana University, 1967. 

issociate Dean for Clinical Affairs 

ohn F. Hasler, B.S., Indiana University, 

958; D.D.S.. 1962; M.S.D., 1969. 

issociate Dean for Continuing Education 
Robert W. Haroth, D.D.S., University of 
Maryland, 1958; M.Ed., 1972. 

issistant Dean for Recruitment and Admissions 
"harles B. Leonard. Jr., B.A., Rutgers Col- 
sge, 1955; M.S., University of Maryland, 
957; Ph.D.. 1963. 

Asst. Dean for Student Affairs 
Mark L. Wagner, A. R. , Birmingham 
Southern College, 1959; D.M.D. 
'University of Alabama, 1963. 



Assistant Dean for Advanced Specialty Educa- 
tion 



iVilbur O. Ramsey 
Maryland. 1943. 



D.D.S., University of 



Faculty Emeriti 

Myron S. Aisenberg, D.D.S. 
Dean Emeritus 

Irving I. Abramson, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 

Joseph C. Biddix, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 

Raymond M. Burgison, Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 

Edward C. Dobbs, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S. 

Professor Emeritus 

Gardner P.H. Foley, A.M. 
Professor Emeritus 

Ernest B. Nuttall, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 

Kyrle W. Preis. D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 

Charles T. Pridgeon, D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 

Donald E. Shay, Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 

John I. White, Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 

Riley S. Williamson, Jr.. D.D.S. 
Professor Emeritus 

George McLean, M.D. 
Associate Professor Emeritus 

Ida M. Robinson. A.B.. B.S.L.S. 
Librarian Emeritus 



47 



Principal Academic Officers 

Dean, Dental School 

Errol L. Reese, B.S., Fairmont State College, 
1960; D.D.S., West Virginia University, 1963: 
M.S.. University of Detroit, 1968. 



Dean, School of Law 

Michael J. Kelly, B.A., Princeton University, 
1959; Ph.D., Cambridge University, 1964; 
L.L.B., Yale University, 1967. 

Dean, School of Medicine 

John M. Dennis, B.S., University of Maryland. 

1943; M.D., 1945. 



Dean, School of Nursing 
Nan B. Hechenberger, B.S., Villa Nova Uni- 
versity, 1956; M.S., The Catholic University 
of America. 1959; Ph.D.. 1974. 

Dean, School of Pharmacy 
William J. Kinnard, Jr., B.S., University of 
Pittsburgh, 1953; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., Purdue 
University, 1957. 

Dean, School of Social Work and Community 

Planning 

Ruth H. Young, A.B., Wellesley College, 

1944; M.S.S.W., The Catholic University of 

America, 1949; D.S.W., 1965. 

Acting Dean of Graduate and Interprofessional 
Studies and Research 

Rosslyn W.I. Kessel, Ph.D., Rutgers Univer- 
sity, 1960. 



Officers of the University 

President John S. Toll, B.S., Yale University, 
1944; A.M., Princeton University, 1948; 
Ph.D., 1952. 



Chancellor T. Albert Farmer, Jr, B.S. 
sity of North Carolina; M.D., 1957. 



Univer 



Vice Chancellor for General Administration 
George Stuehler, B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1962; M.B.A., University of Penn 
sylvania, 1966: M.P.H., The Johns Hopkins 
University, 1972; Sc.D., 1974. 

Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs John M. 
Dennis, B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; 
M.D., 1945. 

The University of Maryland 

Board of Regents 

Mr. Peter F. O'Malley, Chairman, 1985 

The Honorable Joseph D. Tydings, Vice Chair 

man, 1984 

Mr. A. Paul Moss, Secretary, 1983 

Mrs. Mary H. Broadwater, Treasurer, 1983 

Mrs. Constance C. Stuart, Assistant Secretary, 

1985 

Mr. Joseph M. Hymson, Assistant Treasurer, 

1982 

The Hon. Wayne A. Cawley, Jr., Ex Officio 

Mr. A. James Clark, 1986 

Mr. David K. Fram, 1982 

Mr. Ralph W. Frey, 1986 

Dr. Samuel H. Hoover, 1982 

The Honorable Blair Lee, III, 1985 

Mr. Allen L. Schwait, 1984 

Mr. Wilbur G. Valentine, 1982 

Mr. John W.T. Webb, 1985 





"he Alumni Association 

'he Alumni Association is an independent or- 
anization of the Baltimore College of Dental 
rUrgery, Dental School, University of Mary- 
ind at Baltimore, representing approximately 
,000 graduates worldwide. With headquarters 
i the Dental School and five chartered sec- 
ons, the Association is actively interested in 
le organizational structure of the School. 

The annual meeting is held during Alumni 
yeek and coincides with graduation. Quarterly 
leetings are held during the year at which time 

ssociation business is conducted. 

Throughout the year alumni receptions are 
eld throughout the country, and officers of the 
Association participate whenever possible. In 
ddition, social affairs are held at the Dental 
Ichool for the students and alumni. 

Yearly the Association honors one of the 
lumni by bestowing the Distinguished Alum- 
us Award. This is the highest award the Asso- 
iation can bestow. 



Alumni Association Officers 

President 

Dr. William Strahan '48 

220 University Boulevard, West 

Silver Spring, Maryland 20901 



First Vice President 

Dr. Raymond W. Palmer, Jr. '56 

201 Baltimore & Annapolis Boulevard, N.W. 

Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 



Second Vice President 

Dr. Robert P. Murphy '56 

605 Baltimore & Annapolis Boulevard 

Severna Park, Maryland 21146 



Secretary 

Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio '46 
6810 North Charles Street 
Towson, Maryland 21204 



Recording Secretary 

Dr. Robert W. Haroth '58 

Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201 



Treasurer 

Dr. George H. Williams, III '66 
121 16 Jerusalem Road 
Kingsville, Maryland 21087 



Editor 

Dr. Kyrle W. Preis 

Mt. Vista and Belair Roads 

Kingsville, Maryland 21087 



Historian -A rch i vist 
Mr. Gardner P.H. Foley 
4407 Sedgwick Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21210 



Past President 
Dr. Robert V. Bates '56 
10634 York Road 
Cockeysville, Maryland 21030 



49 



** w 




1p 



4 



:?H 



•;;;:?•; 



Policy Statements 

• The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland at Balti- 
more is an affirmative action, equal opportunity 
institution. It adheres to all federal and state 
laws and regulations on non-discrimination re- 
garding race, color, religion, age, national ori- 
gin or sex. It adheres to all federal and state 
laws and regulations on non-discrimination re- 
garding physical or mental handicap. 

• Students are considered for admission to the 
University of Maryland Dental School without 
regard to race, color, creed or sex. It is the ob- 
jective of the School to enroll students with di- 
versified backgrounds in order to make the edu- 
cational experience more meaningful for each 
individual as well as to provide dental health 
practitioners to all segments of the community. 

• The provisions of this publication are not to 
be regarded as an irrevocable contract between 
the student and the University of Maryland. 



50 



The University reserves the right to change a 
provision or requirement at any time within the 
student's term of residence. The University fur 
ther reserves the right, at any time, to ask a 
student to withdraw when it considers such 
action to be in the best interests of the Univer- 
sity. 



• The Dental School is accredited by the Com 
mission on Accreditation of Dental and Dental 
Auxiliary Educational Programs of the Council 
on Dental Education of the American Dental 
Association. 

• The University of Maryland has been electee 
to membership in the Association of American 
Universities. This Association, founded in 
1900, is an organization of those universities in 
the United States and Canada generally consid-: 
ered to be preeminent in the fields of graduate 
and professional study and research. 



ndex 



cademic policies 15 

Administrative Officers: 

Dental School 47 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 48 

Admission/Application: 

Dental Program 13 

Dental hygiene program 34 

Graduate program 39 

Postgraduate programs 40 

With advanced standing 14 

ffirmative Action Policy 50 

Athletic Facilities 43 

SIJAlumni Association 49 

Attendance Policy 16 

Awards: 

Dental students 46 

Dental hygiene students 46 

Calendar 4 

ampus Health Service 43 

ampus Map 52 

ombined degree programs: 

Undergraduate 15 

Graduate 39 

ontinuing Education Program 41 

ourse descriptions: 

Dental program 22 

Dental hygiene program 35 

urriculum: 

Dental 20 

Dental hygiene 33 

Postgraduate 40 

ental Admissions Test 13 

ental Hygiene Admissions Test 34 

epartments of instruction 22 

I disclosure of information policy 8 

)ress Regulations 17 



k : 



:m 



Employment opportunities: 

Dental 19 

Dental hygiene 31 

Expenses: 

Dental students 18 

Dental hygiene students 34 

Faculty Emeriti 47 

Financial Aid: 

Dental 9 

Dental hygiene 11 

Graduate programs 39 

Graduation requirements: 

Dental program 17 

Dental hygiene program 35 

Diploma application 8 

Early graduation 17 

Health requirements 8 

Housing 43 

Insurance: 

Health 8 

Professional liability: 

Dental 8 

Dental hygiene 8 

Lecture funds 4 

Library 3 

Minimester 16 

Museum 4 

Organizations 44 

Publications 44 

Registration 5 

Resident status 5 

Specially Tailored Educational Program 16 

Student Judicial Policy 19 

Student Union 43 

Transcripts 7 

Tuition 6 

Withdrawal 7 



51 



CAMPUS MAP 





f ~/h/ti/t/t7tytk ~J~'u 
tin nn inninninnlnm 



J L 



W LEXINGTON ST 



® 



rf3 

® 



BUILDING KEY 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
AT BALTIMORE 




1. Allied Health Professions 16 
Building. 32 S. Greene St. 

2. Baltimore Union. 621 W. 17 
Lombard St. 

3. Bressler Research Building. 29 S. 18 
Greene St. ]9 

4. (Walter P. ) Carter Center. 630 W. 
Fayette St. 20 

5. Community Pediatrics Center. 700 

W. Lombard St. ->j 

6. Davidge Hall. 522 W. Lombard 

St. 22 

7. Dunning Hall. 636 W. Lombard 
St. 

8. East Hall. 520 W. Lombard St. 23. 

9. Fayette Street Garage. 633 W. 
Fayette St. 24 

10. Gray Laboratory. 520 W. 

Lombard St. 25 

11. Hayden-Harris Hall. 666 W. 
Baltimore St. 26 

12. Health Sciences Computer Center. 

610 W. Lombard St. 27 

13. Health Sciences Library. Ill S. 
Greene St. 28 

14. Howard Hall, 660 W. Redwood 

St. 29 

15. Howard Hall Tower. 655 W. 
Baltimore St. 30 



Institute of Psychiatry and Human 

Behavior. 645 W. Redwood St. 

Kelly Memorial Building. 650 W. 

Lombard St. 

Lane Hall. 500 W. Baltimore St. 

Legal Services Clinic. 116 N. 

Paca St. 

Lexington Street Garage, 680 W. 

Lexington St. 

Lombard Building. 511 W. 

Lombard St. 

Maryland Institute for Emergency 

Medical Services Systems 

(MIEMSS). 22 S. Greene St. 

Medical School Teaching Facility. 

10 S. Pine St. 

Medical Technology Building. 31 

S. Greene St. 

Mencken House, 1524 Hollins St. 

(off campus) 

Methadone Program. 121 S. 

Greene St. (off campus) 

Newman Center, 712 W. Lombard 

St. 

Parsons Residence Hall for 

Women, 622 W. Lombard St. 

Pascault Row. 651-655 W. 

Lexington St. 

Pharmacy School Building. 10 N. 

Pine St. ' 



31. Pratt Street Garage and Athletic 
Facility. 646 W. Pratt St. 

32. Redwood Hall. 721 W. Redwood 
St. 

33. Ronald McDonald House. 635 W. 
Lexington St. 

34. School of Nursing Building, 655 
W. Lombard St. 

35. School of Social Work and 
Administration Building. 525 W. 
Redwood St. 

36. State Medical Examiner's 
Building, 111 Penn St. 

37. Temporary Academic Building. 
601 W. Lombard St. 

38. Thurgood Marshall Law Library, 
20 N. Paca St. 

39. Tuerk House. 106 N. Greene St. 

40. University Garage. 701 W. 
Redwood St. 

41. University of Maryland Hospital, 
22 S. Greene St. 

41. University of Maryland Hospital. 
22 S. Greene St. 

42. University Plaza Garage. 
Redwood and Greene Sts. 

43. Westminster Church. 515 W. 
Fayette St. 

44. Whitehurst Hall. 624 W. Lombard 
St. 



52 



BALTIMORE 
COLLEGE OF 



DBMrALSU.tGJiRY 



UKWERSITY 



OF MARYLAND 
1984-1986 




DENTAL SCHOOL 
BULLETIN 

1984-1986 



Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Dental School 

University of Maryland 

"Within these stones and bricks, healing is to be 
administered, and no less important, human 
relationships developed between teacljers and 
students and between students and patients. If 
ever patients are regarded as clinical material, 
this building will have been degraded and its 
use corrupted. We must never forget that the 
word patient comes from the Latin root which 
means to suffer. Clinical material does not suf- 
fer. Human beings do. " 

From the address of 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Regents 

University of Maryland 

Dedication of Hayden-Harris Hall 

March 5, 1971 



CONTENTS 



3 



General Information 

Statement of Philosophy 
The School 
The Campus 
The City 


5 

5 
5 
8 
9 


Matriculation Policies and 
Procedures 

Registration Procedures 
Determination of In-State Status 
1984-85 Projected Tuition and Fees 
Student Expenses 
Official University Records 
Student Health Requirements 


51 

51 
51 
51 


The Dental Program 

Admission/Application 


11 
11 
13 
17 
17 
18 
19 


54 
54 
55 


Academic Policies and Programs 
Requirements for Graduation 
Employment Opportunities in Dentistry 
The Dental Curriculum 
Departments/Programs 


Financial Resources 

University Grants 
Federal Grants 
Endowment and Loan Funds 


56 

56 
56 
56 


Dental Hygiene Programs 

General Information 

Preprofessional/Professional Baccalaureate 
Program 


29 
29 

29 

30 
35 
36 

39 

39 
39 
41 


Administration and Faculty 

Dental School 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

University of Maryland 


59 

59 
68 
68 


Curricula 
Postcertificate Baccalaureate Program 


Alumni Association 


69 


Master of Science Program 


Policy Statements 


70 


Advanced Education Programs 

Graduate Education 


Academic Calendar 


71 


Advanced Specialty Education Programs 
Continuing Dental Education Program 


Campus Map 


72 


Student Life 

Student Services 
Student Policies 
Publications/Organizations/Awards 


43 

43 

44 
47 





GENERAL INFORMATION 



5 



Statement of Philosophy 

As the art and science of dentistry have evolved 
since its origin in 1840, the dental profession 
has demonstrated a variety of achievements. 
Technical excellence in clinical procedures has 
been augmented by an improved understand- 
ing of human biology 7 . 

The Dental Schools programs focus on 
the three basic aims of the academic commu- 
nity — teaching, research and service. As a uni- 
versity discipline, dental education must meet 
and surpass its previous accomplishments to 
ensure the continued advancement of dentistry. 
While the process of education must remain 
anchored firmly to time-tested principles, it 
must also continually extend itself to uncover 
hidden truths within these same principles and 
thereby contribute to man's progress toward 
better understanding and control of his envi- 
I ronment. 

The School 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Den- 
tal School, University of Maryland at Baltimore 
has the distinction of being the oldest dental 
college in the world. Formal education to pre- 
pare students for the practice of dentistry origi- 
nated in 1840 with the establishment of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. The char- 
tering of the school by the General Assembly 
of Maryland on February 1, 1840 represented 
the culmination of the efforts of Dr. Horace H. 
Hayden and Dr. Chapin A Harris, two dental 
practitioners who recognized the need for sys- 
tematic formal education as the foundation for 
: a scientific and serviceable dental profession. 
Together they played a major role in establish- 
ing and promoting formal dental education, 
and in the development of dentistry as a 
profession. 

Convinced that support for a formal 
course in dental education would not come 
from within medical schools, Dr. Hayden un- 
dertook the establishment of an independent 



dental college. Dr. Harris, an energetic and am- 
bitious young man who had come to Baltimore 
in 1830 to stud\ 7 under Dr. Hayden, was active 
in the effort to found the college, relieving 
Hayden (who was seventy at the time) of many 
of the details involved in such an endeavor. 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
served as a prototype for dental schools gradu- 
ally established in other American cities and 
originated the pattern of modern dental educa- 
tion, with equal emphasis on sound knowledge 
of general medicine and development of the 
skills of dentistry. Through its contributions to 
dental and medical progress and through the 
prominent role of its faculty and graduates in 
the development of the profession, the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery has exerted a 
remarkable influence on professional dentistry. 

The present dental school evolved 
through a series of consolidations involving the 
Maryland Dental College, which merged with 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 
1878; the Dental Department of the University 
of Maryland, founded in 1882; and the Dental 
Department of the Baltimore Medical College, 
which merged with the University of Maryland 
Dental Department in 1913. The final consoli- 
dation took place in 1923, when the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery and the University of 
Maryland Dental School were combined to cre- 
ate a distinct department of the university 
under state supervision and control. In 1970 
the Dental School moved into Hayden-Harris 
Hall, a new five-story building with modern 
equipment and treatment facilities. 




Programs of Study 

The Dental School today offers one of the fin- 
est programs of dental education in the world. 
Continuing efforts are made to provide educa- 
tional and training experiences consistent with 
evolving concepts and advances in the delivery 
of dental health care. 

In addition to the D.D.S. program, the 
school offers baccalaureate and master's degree 
programs in dental hygiene. These programs 
are designed to prepare students for careers in 
dental hygiene practice, education, manage- 
ment and research in private and public set- 
tings. Graduate programs leading to a master's 
or doctoral degree in anatomy, biochemistry, 
microbiology, oral pathology and physiology 
are also offered. A large number of faculty 



members are actively engaged in research; re- 
search opportunities are available to dental stu- 
dents as well as to graduate and postgraduate 
students. 

Postgraduate training is offered in the spe- 
cialty areas of endodontics, oral and maxillofa- 
cial surgery 7 , oral pathology, orthodontics, pedo- 
dontics, periodontics and prosthodontics. 
Programs leading to the degree Master of Sci- 
ence are available to candidates seeking certifi- 
cates of advanced education in the dental spe- 
cialties. Also offered are a program in general 
dentistry 7 providing advanced training in clinical 
dentistry 7 and applied basic sciences for the 
generalist, and a general practice residency 
program through the Dental School and the 
University of Maryland Medical System and 
Hospital. 

The school's continuing education pro- 
gram provides opportunities for dental and 
dental auxiliary 7 practitioners to update their 
knowledge and skills. Approximately 50 
courses are conducted annually in special facili- 
ties designed for the program. 

In 1983 the Dental School opened the 
Center for the Study of Human Performance in 
Dentistry 7 , a unique educational, research and 
treatment complex which is the only facility 7 of 
its kind in the Western Hemisphere. It provides 
students and faculty diverse opportunities for 
the study, utilization and evaluation of ad- 
vanced concepts of dental education and care 
delivery 7 , with a primary 7 focus on human per- 
formance. Because of its potential as a model 
for universal application to the training of den- 
tal personnel, the World Health Organization 
has designated the Dental School a WHO Col- 
laborating Center for the Review and Evalua- 
tion of Performance Simulation Training Sys- 
tems in Oral Health Care. 

After more than 140 years of service to 
dental education, the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery 7 , Dental School, University of 
Maryland at Baltimore continues to fulfill, 
through its graduates, the aspirations of its 
founders to provide scientifically trained 
professionals to serve the oral health care 
needs of societv. 



dun 

112 



7 



Student Body 

Four hundred sixty-three (463) students were 
enrolled in the dental program in the 1983-84 
academic year. Of these, 27 percent were fe- 
male; 20 percent were minority. The first year 
class represented 60 undergraduate institutions. 
Students enrolled averaged 24 years of age, 
and six had earned master's degrees. The fac- 
ulty numbered over 200 persons, including re- 
spected practitioners who teach at the school 
part-time. 

Museum of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery 

The Museum of the Baltimore College of Den- 
tal Surgery 7 is located in the reading room of 
the Independent Learning Center on the 
ground floor of Hayden-Harris Hall. Some spe- 
cial displays are appropriately located in other 
areas of the building. 

Because of its heritage from the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery and the importance 
of Baltimore in the development of profes- 
sional dentistry 7 , the museum has developed a 
large and valuable collection of objects and 
specimens of historical and professional inter- 
est. Several items of national and international 
interest, such as George Washington's ivory- and 
gold dentures, are on loan to the Smithsonian 
Institution in Washington, D.C., where they may 
be shared with a larger audience. 

Items currently on display- in the museum 
include dental chairs and operatories from var- 
ious periods of dental history, instrument cabi- 
nets, early instruments, dentures representing 
the various stages through which the art of 
dental prosthesis progressed, the Guerini cabi- 
net containing replicas of dental appliances 
prom the most ancient times through the 18th 
Century 7 , and portraits of leaders in the devel- 
opment of professional dentistry. 

The museum and the Independent Learn- 
ing Center are open throughout the year Mon- 
|day through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
-vith extended hours evenings and Saturdays 
during the regular academic year. Group tours 
are welcome, but arrangements must be made 
n advance by calling (301) 528-7944. 



Special Lectures 

The Grayson W. Gaver Memorial Lecture 

Through the generosity of both his family and 
the school alumni, an endowed lectureship was 
established in memory 7 of the late Dr. Grayson 
W. Gaver, an outstanding leader in the field of 
prosthodontics and a distinguished member of 
the faculty 7 for many years. The Gaver Lecture is 
presented biennially as pan of Student-Faculty 
Day activities. 

The Stephen E. and Jeffrey A Kleiman Lec- 
tures in Dentistry and Medicine As a tribute 
to the selection of careers in the health profes- 
sions by his sons, Dr. Bernard S. Kleiman es- 
tablished this annual lecture program to alter- 
nate between the University of Maryland Dental 
School and the School of Medicine. Distin- 
guished individuals are invited to lecture on 
topics pertinent and applicable to practicing 
dentists or physicians. The Kleiman Lecture al- 
ternates with the Gaver Lecture as part of Stu- 
dent-Faculty Day activities. 
The William B. and Elizabeth S. Powell Lec- 
ture In 1965 two faithful alumni, Drs. William 
B. and Elizabeth S. Powell, presented the 
school with a generous contribution for the 
purpose of instituting special lectures for the 
benefit of the student body and faculty 7 . The 
first lecture in the series was presented in April 
1966. These lectures provide a means of broad- 
ening the total academic program. 



8 



The Jane Boswell Toomey and Lewis Cole 
Toomey, D.D.S. Memorial Lecture. Endowed in 
1982 by a major gift from the Toomey family, 
together with contributions by friends and as- 
sociates of Dr. and Mrs. Toomey, this biennial 
lecture will be initiated during the 1984-85 aca- 
demic year. The Toomey Lecture will make it 
possible for distinguished individuals to be in- 
vited to speak on timely dental research and 
clinical topics useful to dental professionals in 
practice and teaching. The lectures will be 
open to all members of the dental community. 
In addition to these annual lectures, there 
are three special lectures which are presented 
on a rotating basis once every three years as 
part of the Commencement/Alumni Week activ- 
ities: The John E. Fogarty Memorial Lecture, 
sponsored by the Rhode Island Section of the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery Alumni 
Association; The Hayden-Harris Memorial Lec- 
ture, sponsored by the Alumni Association; and 
The J. Ben Robinson Memorial Lecture, spon- 
sored by the Maryland Section of the American 
College of Dentists. 

The Campus 

The Dental School is located on the campus of 
the University of Maryland at Baltimore in the 
heart of metropolitan Baltimore. Other major 
units of this campus are the Graduate School, 
Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, 
Social Work and Community- Planning, and the 
University 7 of Maryland Medical System and 
Hospital. These professional schools and their 
service programs contribute to the health and 
welfare of the citizens of Maryland. The sup- 
port and utilization of the university's services 
by community- residents in turn represent a vi- 
tal resource for the university. 

The Health Sciences Library 

The Health Sciences Library 7 of the University of 
Maryland at Baltimore serves the Dental 
School, the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Phar- 
macy, Social Work and Community Planning, 
the University of Man-land Medical Svstem and 



Hospital, the Graduate School, and other affili- 
ated institutions. Currently the library- has over 
240,000 volumes and over 3,100 periodical sub- 
scriptions. The collection size ranks the library 
among the 15 largest health sciences libraries 
in the United States. 

To enhance services the library 7 has com- 
puterized many of its operations including cir- 
culation and cataloging. The online catalog, 
which offers more searching options than the 
card catalog, is available for access via library 
terminals, on-campus terminals hooked up to 
the computer center, and home or office termi- 
nals with dial-up capabilities. The Health Sci- 
ences Library 7 also provides Computerized Ref- 
erence and Bibliographic Service (CRABS), an 
automated literature retrieval svstem for journal 
articles which includes MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, 
ERIC, and TOXLINE as well as 30 other infor- 
mation data bases. 

The library is open 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. 
(Monday-Friday), 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. (Satur- 
day), and 12:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. (Sunday). Spe- 
cial holiday and summer hours are posted. 
Borrowers must show a UMAB ID badge vali- 
dated for the current year. 

Professional Schools Computer Center 

Computers located on both the UMAB and Col 
lege Park campuses are available to enrolled 
students on the UMAB campus through the fa- 
cilities of the Professional Schools Computer 
Center (PSCC). The system has capabilities to 
use Basic, Fortran, Pascal and PL-1 languages; 
and to program statistical analysis packages 
SPSS, SAS and DMDP. To gain' access to this 
unit, a student must open an account with 
PSCC. Credit and non-credit courses on pro- 
gramming and computer applications are of- 
fered to help students use the center to full 
advantage. 



The City 

Statistically, Baltimore is the largest city in 
Maryland, the tenth most populous in the na- 
tion, and the site of the country's third largest 
foreign commerce seaport. The Baltimore re- 
gion has much to offer the student, from the 
sophistication and culture of a large metropoli- 
tan city, to the beauty and leisure of the sur- 
rounding waterfront and rural areas. Having 
been the location of many significant events in 
the nation's history, including the writing of the 
national anthem, Baltimore maintains a strong 
feeling for the past as typified by the many 
charming neighborhoods of restored houses 
and abundance of historic buildings. 

And yet, Baltimore has become increas- 
ingly forward-thinking and is making outstand- 
ing progress in the revitalization and rebirth of 
its downtown area. A prime example is Charles 
Center, one of the early models for urban plan- 
i ning in the country 7 , which incorporates a thea- 
ter, hotel, shops, and series of plazas and ele- 
vated walkways that are used as settings for 
frequent fairs, concerts, art shows and festivals. 
Connecting this center to the outskirts of the 
i city is the new Baltimore Metro subway system, 
the first leg of an anticipated city 7 -wide subway- 
system. Even closer to campus, one of the most 
exciting renovated places is the inner harbor. 
This busy port area includes office buildings, 
apartments, schools, parks, recreational facili- 
ties — in all, an entirely 7 new living and working 
complex. 

As a cultural center, Baltimore has offer- 
ings to please the most discriminating. It pos- 
sesses an excellent symphony 7 , which is housed 
in a magnificant new symphony hall, a profes- 
sional opera company, and the newly reno- 
vated Peabody Conservatory of Music. The city 7 
also boasts many professional and semiprofes- 
sional theatres, outstanding museums, excellent 
libraries, and historical and scientific societies, 
the newest of which are the National Aquarium 
which opened in the inner harbor area in 1981 
and the Maryland Academy of Sciences Center. 




Douvitoim Baltimore and Intier Harbor uith Dental 
Sdxjol envied. 
Photo by M. E. Warren 

Sports fans, too, have a lot to savor in Bal- 
timore thanks to the wide range of professional 
and collegiate teams. The city is famous, of 
course, for the Orioles and the Colts, but both 
spectators and participants will also find excel- 
lent hockey, soccer, lacrosse, basketball, horse- 
racing, golf and tennis close at hand. Also 
nearby 7 is the Chesapeake Bay 7 , offering numer- 
ous water sports and the seafood for which 
Baltimore is famous. 



THE DENTAL PROGRAM 



11 



Admission/Application 

Requirements for Admission to the 
Dental Program 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Den- 
tal School, University of Man-land at Baltimore 
subscribes to a policy of equal educational op- 
portunity for men and women of all races, 
creeds and ethnic origins. The Dental School, 
in seeking to broaden the racial and ethnic bal- 
ance of its enrollment, encourages minority 
student applications. It is the objective of the 
Dental School to enroll students with diversi- 
fied backgrounds in order to make the educa- 
tional experience more meaningful for each in- 
dividual as well as to provide dental health 
practitioners to all segments of the community. 

Applicants for admission to the dental pro- 
gram must have successfully completed at least 
three academic years in an accredited college 
of arts and sciences. The college course must 
include at least a year's credit in English (6), in 
biology (8), in physics (8), in general or inor- 
ganic chemistry (8), and in organic chemistry 
(8). All required science courses shall include 
both classroom and laboratory instruaion. In 
addition to the 90 semester hours of credit re- 
quired (exclusive of physical education and 
military' science), other courses in the humani- 
ties and the biological and social sciences are 
desirable. No more than 60 of the minimum 
required credits will be accepted from a junior 
college; these credits must have been validated 
by an accredited college of arts and sciences. 
By the ruling of the Faculty Council, all admis- 
sion requirements must be completed by June 
30 prior to the desired date of admission. 

All applicants must also present favorable 
recommendations from their respective pre- 
dental committee or, if no such committee is 
available, from one instructor each in the de- 
partments of biology and chemistry. In all 
other respects, applicants must give even- 
promise of becoming successful students and 
dentists of high standing. Applicants will not be 
admitted with unabsolved conditions or unab- 
solved failures. 



Man-land residents should have science 
and cumulative grade point average (GPA) val- 
ues of 2.6 or higher to be competitive for ad- 
mission; nonresidents should have GPA values 
of 3.1 or higher to meet the preferred require- 
ments for admission. All applicants are encour- 
aged to take the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) 
in April of the year prior to admission but 
must take the DAT for the first time by no later 
than October of the year prior to admission. 

A pamphlet describing the test and an ap- 
plication to take the test will be sent to the ap- 
plicant upon request made to the Office of Re- 
cruitment and Admissions of the Dental School. 
The pamphlet lists the dates of the tests (given 
in April and October) and the location of test- 
ing centers throughout the United States, its 
possessions and Canada. Residents of Maryland 
should have scores of 4 or higher in the Aca- 
demic Average and the Perceptual Ability- sec- 
tions in order to be competitive; nonresidents 
should have scores of 5 or higher in these sec- 
tions to meet the preferred requirements for 
admission. Information on the regulations for 
the determination of resident status may be ob- 
tained from the Division of Admissions and 
Registrations, 621 West Lombard Street, Room 
326, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Balti- 
more, Man-land 21201. 

Application and Acceptance Procedures 

Students are admitted only at the beginning of 
the fall semester in August. All applications are 
processed through the American Association of 
Dental Schools Application Senice (AADSAS). 
An AADSAS application request card will be 
sent to the applicant after May 1 of the year 
prior to the desired date of admission upon re- 
quest made to the Office of Recruitment and 
Admissions of the Dentil School. The AADSAS 



12 



application must be filed by all applicants prior 
to December 1; early filing of the application is 
strongly recommended AADSAS will duplicate 
the transcript, calculate the grade point average 
of each applicant, and furnish pertinent infor- 
mation to the Office of Recruitment and Admis- 
sions of the Dental School. 

If the requirements for admission are ful- 
filled, the applicant will receive the Dental 
School's application form, which should be 
completed and mailed with the application fee 
to the Office of Recruitment and Admissions of 
the Dental School. If receipt of the application 
and application fee is not acknowledged within 
ten days, the applicant should contact the Of- 
fice of Recruitment and Admissions. All appli- 
cants who are seriously being considered will 
be interviewed; a personal interview does not, 
however, guarantee admission. The Subcom- 
mittee on Dental Student Admissions, com- 
posed of members of the faculty, students and 
alumni, selects qualified applicants for admis- 
sion based on the applicant's grade point aver- 
age, DAT scores, personal recommendations 
and the personal interview. A deposit of $200 
must accompany an applicant's acceptance of 
an offer of admission. The deposit is intended 
to ensure registration in the class and is cred- 
ited toward the applicant's tuition. One-half of 
the deposit is refundable if the Dental School 
is able to fill the vacancy caused by a with- 
drawal. 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

It is the policy of the Faculty Council of the 
Dental School that neither graduates of foreign 
dental schools nor students transferring from 
dental schools outside the continental United 
States be considered for admission with ad- 
vanced standing. Graduates of foreign dental 
schools may take an examination given by the 
Maryland State Board of Dental Examiners in 
order to qualify for a license to practice in the 
State of Maryland. Those who do not pass the 
examination can make application, according to 
established policies and procedures, to be con- 
sidered for admission to the Dental School as a 
regular first-year student. Any student accepted 
for admission may be exempted from certain 
courses by passing a competency examination. 



Students currently attending a dental 
school in the continental United States may ap- 
ply for admission with advanced standing, but 
must be in good standing in scholarship and 
character to be considered for admission. 
An applicant for transfer from another dental 
school must: 

• Meet fully the requirements for admis- 
sion described above 

• Be eligible for advancement to the next 
higher class in the school from which the 
applicant seeks to transfer 

• Have an overall average of C (2.0 on a 
4.0 scale) in all previous dental school 
courses excluding basic dental science or 
its equivalent and oral pathology, in 
which the applicant must have a grade of 
C or higher 

• Present a letter of honorable withdrawal 
and recommendation from the dean of 
the school from which the applicant is 
transferring 

All applicants who meet these requirements 
will be sent the Dental School's application 
forms and will be scheduled for an interview. 
They will be required to submit from the den- 
tal school which they are currently attending an 
academic record and a detailed course outline 
for each dental school course completed prior 
to transfer. These records will be referred to 
the appropriate department chairmen of the 
Dental School for review and recommendation 
concerning acceptance and evaluation. The ad- 
mission of a student by transfer is, in every 
case, contingent upon the availability of space 
in the class to which the student is seeking ad- 
mission. Credit hours, as listed in the prior aca- 
demic record of the transferring student, will 
be prorated to conform with the cumulative 
credit hours of students in that class, in order 



13 



to establish a comparable cumulative grade 
point average and class rank for purposes of 
university and Dental School honors, letters of 
recommendation, etc. 

UMES-UMAB Honors Program 

In Fall 1979, the University of Maryland Eastern 
Shore (UMES), in cooperation with the profes- 
sional schools of the University of Maryland at 
Baltimore (UMAB), instituted an Honors Pro- 
gram in an effort to prepare students for 
professional school study while providing them 
with a sound liberal arts education at the same 
time. The Honors Program consists of honors 
sections in chemistry, biology, mathematics, 
English and social science. It also emphasizes 
independent study, seminars and colloquia 
through which students are expected to ex- 
plore in depth the various disciplines. Specific 
preprofessional tracks in allied health, dentistry, 
law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social 
work and community planning are available. 
Upon successful completion of all require- 
ments of the Honors Program, which include 
the professional school admission require- 
ments, the Honors Program graduate will be 
admitted into the corresponding professional 
school on the UMAB campus during the year 
immediately following graduation from UMES. 
Admission into the Honors Program is de- 
termined by the Honors Program Committee 
which is composed of representatives from 
UMES and each professional school at UMAB. A 
combination of predictive factors, such as SAT 
scores, an interview(s), a personal statement 
written at the time of the interview, and letters 
of recommendation, will be used to determine 
the eligibility of a student for admission into 
the Honors Program. The cumulative academic 
performance of an applicant, as indicated by 
the high school record, will be assessed. Stu- 
dents anticipating possible entrance into the 
program should have concentrated and ex- 
celled in an academically enriched curriculum 
beginning as early as the freshman year in high 
school. For additional information, write to the 
Honors Committee, University of Maryland 
Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland 21853. 



Optional Combined Arts and Sciences/ 
Dental Program 

The University of Maryland at College Park, 
University of Maryland Baltimore County, 
Bowie State College, Coppin State College and 
Morgan State University offer a combined arts 
and sciences dental curriculum leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of 
Dental Surgery. The preprofessional part of this 
curriculum may be taken in residence in the 
college of arts and sciences on any of the five 
campuses, and the professional part in the 
Dental School in Baltimore. Students who have 
been approved for the combined program and 
who have completed the arts and sciences 
phase may, upon the recommendation of the 
dean of the Dental School, be granted the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science by the college of 
arts and sciences at the first summer com- 
mencement following the completion of the 
student's first year in the Dental School. Fur- 
ther information and applications may be ob- 
tained from the office of admissions at the re- 
spective undergraduate college. 

Academic Policies and Programs 

In the evaluation of student performance, the 
following letter grades are used: 

A - excellent E - conditional 

B - good F - failure 

C - satisfactory I - incomplete 

D - below average 

A failure must be absolved by repeating 
the entire course, in which case the original F 
grade remains on the student's permanent re- 
cord, but only the new grade is used to com- 
pute the grade point average. 



14 



A student whose performance is not satis- 
factory in one or more segments of a course 
or in some clinical procedures may receive an 
E grade. This grade indicates that the student 
has failed to master a limited segment of a 
course but should achieve a satisfactory level of 
proficiency within a short time. When the E 
grade is used as a temporary- final grade it re- 
mains on the student record. Following suc- 
cessful remediation, the student will receive 
the final grade earned in the course. An unre- 
solved grade of E will result in a permanent 
grade of F. 

Students whose work in completed assign- 
ments is of acceptable quality but who, because 
of circumstances beyond their control (such as 
illness or disability), have been unable to com- 
plete course requirements will receive a grade 
of Incomplete. When all requirements have 
been satisfied, students will receive the final 
grade earned in the course. Except under ex- 
traordinary circumstances, an Incomplete may 
not be carried into the next academic year. 

In the clinical sciences, performance at the 
D level is unacceptable; thus the D grade is not 
used by the clinical departments or Basic Den- 
tal Science. 

Scholastic averages are computed on the 
basis of credits assigned to each course and the 
following numerical values for grades: A-4, B- 
3, C-2, D-l, F-0. The grade point average is 
the sum of the products of course credits and 
grade values, divided by the total number of 
course credits in that year of the curriculum. 

Students must achieve a 2.0 grade point 
average in order to advance unconditionally to 
the next year. Probationary advancement may 
be permitted for students in the following cate- 
gories: 

1 . First-year students who obtain a grade point 
average of 1.70-1.99 

2. Second-year students who obtain a grade 
point average of 1.70-1.99 in second-year 
courses 

3. Third-year students who obtain a grade point 
average of 1.85-1.99 in third-year courses 



A student placed on probationary status 
must achieve a minimum 2.0 average and pass 
all courses taken during the probationary aca- 
demic year. Failure to do so will result in dis- 
missal from the dental program subject to dis- 
cretionary 7 review by the Faculty Council. 

A student may be permitted to absolve de- 
ficiencies during the summer session, as rec- 
ommended by the appropriate advancement 
committee. Depending on the type of deficien- 
cies involved, students may be required to reg- 
ister and pay a fee for the summer session. 

The performance of each student is re- 
viewed at the end of the first semester and at 
the end of the academic year by an advance- 
ment committee. At the end of the first semes- 
ter, the committee determines, on the basis of 
progress and/or final grades, whether the stu- 
dent is progressing satisfactorily or if remedia- 
tion or assignment to a special program (first- 
or second-year students only) is warranted. At 
this time, the committee also has the option of 
recommending dismissal to the Facultv Coun- 
cil. 

Students assigned to a special program are 
placed under the supervision of the Special Ac- 
ademic Programs Committee, which tailors a 
program to the needs and abilities of each stu- 
dent and determines advancement or recom- 
mends dismissal on the basis of progress and/ 
or final grades at the end of each semester. All 
first- and second-year courses must have been 
completed satisfactorily before the student may 
be advanced into the regular third-year curricu- 
lum. 



At the end of the academic year, the ap- 
propriate advancement committee determines 
for each student either unconditional advance- 
ment, probationary advancement, repeat of the 
year, or recommends academic dismissal to the 
Faculty Council, which is the deliberative body 
that approves advancement committee deci- 
sions concerning dismissal or graduation. A stu- 
dent may appeal any action of an advancement 
committee by submission of a written request 
to the dean. 

Specially Tailored Educational Program 

The Specially Tailored Educational Program 
(STEP) functions within the framework of the 
regular curriculum but allows students to 
spend up to three years completing first- and 
second-year courses. The program was devel- 
oped for students who, because of academic 
difficulty, illness or other circumstances, need 
special assistance and/or additional time to ful- 
'fill the academic requirements. 

The First and Second Year Advancement 
Committees may offer a student the option of 
STEP or assign to STEP any student whose 
progress is unsatisfactory, if it is generally 
agreed that a reduced load and/or special tuto- 
rial assistance may improve the student's 
chance of successfully completing course re- 
quirements. 

Students assigned to STEP are placed 
under the supervision of the Special Academic 
Programs Committee, which plans an individu- 
alized program for each student and carefully 
monitors progress. Departmental counselors in 
the basic sciences and preclinical sciences are 
available to assist any student assigned to STEP. 

Students may be advanced into the regular 
, program when they have demonstrated satisfac- 
tory progress; otherwise they remain in STEP 
; until they have completed all first- and second- 
lyear courses. Once the student is advanced 
iinto the regular program, academic progress is 
evaluated by the appropriate advancement 
committee. 




Attendance Policy 

The faculty and administration of the Dental 
School expect every student to attend all sched- 
uled lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions and 
clinic assignments, except in the event of ill- 
ness or emergency 7 . In circumstances of this na- 
ture, absence must be reported to the dean's 
office so that departments can be notified of 
the excused absence and advised to offer assis- 
tance upon the student's return. 



16 



Statement of Faculty, Student and 
Institutional Rights and Responsibilities 
for Academic Integrity 

At the heart of the academic enterprise are 
learning, teaching and scholarship. In univer- 
sities these are exemplified by reasoned discus- 
sion between student and teacher, a mutual re- 
spect for the learning and teaching process, 
and intellectual honesty in the pursuit of new 
knowledge. In the traditions of the academic 
enterprise, students and teachers have certain 
rights and responsibilities which they bring to 
the academic community. While the following 
statements do not imply a contract between the 
teacher or the university and the student, they 
are nevertheless conventions w r hich the univer- 
sity believes to be central to the learning and 
teaching process. 

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Faculty shall share with students and admin- 
istration the responsibility for academic in- 
tegrity. 

2. Faculty are accorded freedom in die class- 
room to discuss subject matter reasonably re- 
lated to the course. In turn they have the re- 
sponsibility to encourage free and honest 
inquiry and expression on the part of stu- 
dents. 

3. Faculty are responsible for the structure and 
content of their courses, but they have re- 
sponsibility to present courses that are con- 
sistent with their descriptions in the univer- 
sity catalog. In addition, faculty have the 
obligation to make students aware of the ex- 
pectations in the course, the evaluation pro- 
cedures and the grading policy. 

4. Faculty are obligated to evaluate students 
fairly and equitably in a manner appropriate 
to the course and its objectives. Grades shall 
be assigned without prejudice or bias. 



5. Faculty shall make all reasonable efforts to 
prevent the occurrence of academic dishon- 
est}' through the appropriate design and 
administration of assignments and examina- 
tions, through the careful safeguarding of 
course materials and examinations, and 
through regular reassessment of evaluation 
procedures. 

6. When instances of academic dishonesty are 
suspected, faculty shall have the right and re- 
sponsibility to see that appropriate action is 
taken in accordance with university regula- 
tions. 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Students shall share with faculty and adminis- 
tration the responsibility for academic integ- 
rity. 

2. Students shall have the right of inquiry and 
expression in their courses without prejudice 
or bias. In addition, students shall have the 
right to know the requirements of their 
courses and to know the manner in which 
they will be evaluated and graded. 

3. Students shall have the obligation to com- 
plete the requirements of their courses in 
the time and manner prescribed and to sub- 
mit to evaluation of their work. 

4. Students shall have the right to be evaluated 
fairly and equitably in a manner appropriate 
to the course and its objectives. 

5. Students shall not submit as their own work 
any work which has been prepared by 
others. Outside assistance in the preparation 
of this w r ork, such as librarian assistance, tu- 
torial assistance, typing assistance, or such as- 
sistance as may be specified or approved by 
the instructor is allowed. 

6. Students shall make all reasonable efforts to 
prevent the occurrence of academic dishon- 
esty. They shall by their own example en- 
courage academic integrity and shall them- 
selves refrain from acts of cheating and 
plagiarism or other acts of academic dishon- 
estv. 



17 



7. When instances of academic dishonesty are 
suspected, students shall have the right and 
responsibility to bring this to the attention of 
the faculty or other appropriate authority. 

Institutional Responsibility 

1. Campuses or appropriate administrative units 
of the University of Maryland shall take ap- 
propriate measures to foster academic integ- 
rity in the classroom. 

2. Campuses or appropriate administrative units 
shall take steps to define acts of academic 
dishonest} 7 , to insure procedures for due 
process for students accused or suspected of 
acts of academic dishonesty, and to impose 
appropriate sanctions on students guilts 7 of 
acts of academic dishonesty. 

3. Campuses or appropriate adminstrative units 
shall take steps to determine how admission 
or matriculation shall be affected by acts of 
academic dishonesty on another campus or 
at another institution. No students suspended 
for disciplinary 7 reasons at any campus of the 
University of Maryland shall be admitted to 
any other University of Maryland campus 
during the period of suspension. 

The Minimester 

Didactic courses offered to all students in the 
January 7 minimester are elective. Third- and 
fourth-year students may participate only in 
! those courses scheduled before 10.00 a.m., 
; since the clinic continues to operate on the 
usual schedule during the minimester. Any 
credit awarded for minimester elective courses 
will not be applied to the D.D.S. degree. 

Undergraduate students contemplating a 
career in dentistry 7 may attend this session on a 
| per course basis. Information concerning 
course offerings is distributed to prospective 
students by the Office of Recruitment and Ad- 
missions and to all enrolled students by the Of- 
fice of Academic Affairs. 



Requirements for Graduation 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is con- 
ferred upon a candidate who has met the con- 
ditions specified below: 

1 . A candidate must have satisfied all require- 
ments of the various departments. 

2. A candidate must pass all fourth-year courses 
and achieve a minimum 2.0 average in the 
fourth year. 

3. The candidate must have paid all debts to 
the university prior to graduation. 

Early Graduation 

The University of Maryland Dental School's 
early graduation program enables talented, 
conscientious students who have completed all 
requirements to be recommended by the fac- 
ulty for graduation in January 7 of the fourth 
year. 

This is not a special educational program. 
Students who qualify 7 must have had educa- 
tional experiences comparable to those of stu- 
dents who will graduate in June and must have 
achieved at least the same degree of clinical 
proficiency. 

Employment Opportunities in 
Dentistry 

The public demand for more and better oral 
health care will continue to create a climate for 
growth in the dental profession. 

Current dental graduates can anticipate ini- 
tial annual net income on the average of 
$25,000 per annum. This income is contingent 
upon and can be affected by the area served, 
the practice specialty, and the state of the econ- 
omv at the time. 



18 



The Dental Curriculum 

Year I 

SUBJECTS 



CREDITS 





Semesters 
1 2 


Total 


Anatomy 
DANA 511 


13 




13 


Basic Dental Science 
DENT 518 


7 


7 


14 


Biochemistry 
DBIC 511 


5 




5 


Conjoint Sciences 
DCJS 512 




3 


3 


Microbiology 
DMIC 512 




5 


5 


Oral Health Care Deliver}' 
OHCD 518 


1 


2 


3 


Physiology 
DPHS 512 




5 


5 



26 



Year II 

SUBJECTS 



22 



CREDITS 



48 





Semesters 
1 2 


Total 


Basic Dental Science 
DENT 528 


12 


13 


25 


Biomedicine 
DPAT 528 


5 


7 


12 


Conjoint Sciences 
DCJS 528 


6 


6 


12 


Oral Health Care Delivery 
OHCD 528 


1 


2 


3 


Pharmacology 
DPHR 521 


5 




5 



29 



28 



57 



Year III 

SUBJECTS 



CREDITS 



Semesters 
1 2 



Conjoint Sciences 
DCJS 538 



Oral Diagnosis/Radiology 
DPAT 538 



Oral Health Care Delivery 

OHCD 538 

or 

OHCD 539 Special Studies 

(elective) 



Total 



(6) 



Oral and Maxillofacial 

Surgery 

DSUR 538 


2 


3 


5 


Orthodontics 
ORTH 538 


1 


1 


2 


Pediatric Dentistry 
PEDS 538 


4 


4 


8 


Periodontics 
PERI 538 


6 


5 


11 


Fixed Restorative 
Dentistry 
FKD 538 


6 


7 


13 


Removable 
Prosthodontics 
REMV 538 


6 


2 


8 


Endodontics 
ENDO 538 


2 


2 


4 


Year IV 

SUBJECTS 


34 


34 
CREDITS 


68 

i 




Semesters 
1 2 


Total 


Conjoint Sciences 
DCJS 548 


3 


3 


6 


Clinic 


29 


29 


58 




32 


32 


64 



19 



I)q)artments/Programs 

Anatomy 

Chairman: D. Vincent Provenza 
Professors: Barn; Piavis, Provenza 
Associate Professors: Gartner, Hassell, Hiatt, 

Meszler, Seibel 
Associate Clinical Professor. Scherlis 
Assistant Clinical Professor: Mader 
Assistant Research Professor: Hollinger 
Lecturer: Lindenberg 

The basic course in human anatomy consists of 
a thorough study of the cells, tissues, organs 
and organ systems of the body from the gross, 
microscropic and developmental aspects. Prin- 
ciples of body structure and function are stud- 
• ied with particular emphasis on those con- 
^ cerned with the head, facial region, oral cavity 
and associated organs. Neuroanatomy deals 
< with the gross and microscropic structure of 
the central nervous system and peripheral 
j nerves with special attention to functional 
phases. Correlation is made with other courses 
i in the basic science and clinical disciplines of 
the dental curriculum. 
DANA 511. Human Anatomy (13) 

Basic Dental Science 

Director. Harold L. Crossley 
Clinical Professor: Halpert 
Associate Professors: Moffitt, Thompson 
Assistant Professor. Crossley 
Staff All clinical departments 
Basic Dental Science is the administrative unit 
directly responsible for teaching the fundamen- 
tal principles, techniques and manual skills re- 
lated to the practice of dentistry during the first 
! and second years of the curriculum, x^eas of 
i instruction include dental morphology and oc- 
clusion, preventive dentistry, periodontics, den- 
jtal materials, operative dentistry, fixed partial 
!prosthodontics. removable complete and partial 
iprosthodontics, endodontics, pediatric dentistry-, 
I orthodontics, oral surgery, oral diagnosis, ra- 
jdiology and dental practice systems. The in- 
jstructional format includes the use of lectures, 
laboratory- projects, self-instructional media, as- 
signed reading, clinical assignments, and both 
[written and practical examinations. Course 
^planning and presentation are coordinated bv 



the director and involve the cooperative effort 
of members of every 7 clinical department. 
DENT 518. Basic Dental Science I (14) 
DENT 528. Basic Dental Science II (25) 

Biochemistry 

Chairman: John P. Lambooy 
Professors: Chang, Lambooy, Leonard, Zenker 
Associate Professors: Bashirelahi, Callery, Thut 
Assistant Professor. Courtade 
Biochemistry- is a study of life's processes in 
terms of molecular structure of food substances 
and body constituents. The department has two 
teaching goals: to present a course in compre- 
hensive biochemistry to the first-year students 
seeking a professional degree in dentistry, and 
to provide a program of specialized training for 
graduate students seeking an advanced gradu- 
ate degree (M.S., Ph.D.) in preparation for a ca- 
reer in teaching and/or research. 

The course provided for students studying 
for the Doctor of Dental Surgery- degree covers 
the major traditional subjects of biochemistry. 
Dental students who have previously taken a 
course in biochemistry may take a competency 
examination which, if passed satisfactorily, per- 
mits them to be excused from taking this 
course. The department also participates in the 
Conjoint Sciences program. 
DBIC 511. Principles of Biochemistry (5) 

Clerkship Program 

Two elective clerkship programs allow selected 
fourth-year students to pursue further studies 
in departmental activities specially designed to 
meet their needs and interests. Students devote 
a portion of their clinic time to these spe- 
cialized programs; the remaining clinic time is 
spent in the comprehensive treatment of pa- 
tients in the regular program. Expanded clerk- 
ship offerings are available not only in basic 
science and clinical disciplines, but also in ad- 
vanced and general practice dentistry- in various 
practice settings. 

DCJS 558. Clerkship I (elective ) (20) 
DCJS 559. Clerkship II (elective) (10) 



20 



Clinical Dentistry 

Staff: All clinical departments 
The clinical education program is designed to 
provide each student with a broad background 
of clinical experience based on the philosophy 
of prevention and comprehensive patient care. 
Although the need for the treatment of existing 
disease is of paramount importance, the clinical 
program stresses those aspects of complete 
dental care which are founded on preventing 
the occurrence or recurrence of disease. Each 
student provides patient care in a manner simi- 
lar to the general practitioner in the commu- 
nity. Clinical areas for undergraduate instruc- 
tion are designated as general practice clinics 
or specialty clinics. Team teaching is accom- 
plished using general dentists and specialists 
providing interdepartmental instruction for the 
student and the highest level of dental care for 
the patient. The clinical program functions year 
round in order to provide continuity of patient 
care. 




Conjoint Sciences 
Director: Harold L. Crossley 
Staff: All departments 

Conjoint Sciences is the administrative unit re- 
sponsible for the coordination of subjects 
which are most appropriately presented in a 
multidisciplinary approach. In the first year 
Conjoint Sciences devotes approximately 20 
hours of lectures to human growth and devel- 
opment and 20 hours to an introduction to the 
clinical programs available to the student in 
caring for the dental patient. 

Immunology, diagnosis and treatment of 
pulp and periapical disease, dental manage- 
ment of the handicapped patient, prevention, 
and dental anesthesiology are subjects pre- 
sented in the second year of Conjoint Sciences. 
Certification for cardiopulmonary resuscitation 
(CPR) and blood pressure measurement also 
are required during the second year of Con- 
joint Sciences. 

The third year of Conjoint Sciences deals 
primarily with the management of clinical 
problems with emphasis on therapeutics. The 
curriculum in the fourth year includes a discus- 
sion of practice options and decisions, CPR re- 
certification and a wide range of elective 
courses. 

DCJS 512. Conjoint Sciences I (3) 
DCJS 528. Conjoint Sciences II (12) 
DCJS 538. Conjoint Sciences III (4) 
DCJS 548. Conjoint Sciences IV (6) 

Dental Care for the Handicapped 
Director, Special Patient Program: Roger L. 

Eldridge 
Assistant Director: John M. Bowman 
This program provides dental students with the 
fundamentals for delivering dental care to 
handicapped children and adults. The didactic 
portion spans three years of the curriculum 
and includes information on the nature of 
handicapping conditions and their effects on 
the patient. Emphasis is on the clinical dental 



21 



management of patients with handicapping dis- 
orders. The didactic phase utilizes independent 
learning resources, augmented by scheduled 
faculty instruction. During the third and fourth 
years, students provide care for handicapped 
patients in the Special Patient Clinic, a facility 
specifically designed and operated for this pur- 
pose. The program emphasizes the special 
needs of the handicapped that must be consid- 
ered in order for diagnostic, preventive and 
corrective dental services to be provided. 

Educational and Instructional Resources 

Chairman: James F. Craig 
Professor: Moreland 
Associate Professor. Craig 
Assistant Professor. Romberg 
Associate Staff: Land 

The Department of Educational and Instruc- 
tional Resources has as its primary objective 
the implementation of a comprehensive in- 
j structional development program embracing all 
I areas of the dental curriculum. Such a program 
; applies the principles of management to the 
! process of education and is designed to main- 
i tain a constant focus on the quality of the edu- 
cation being provided students pursuing a ca- 
1 reer in dentistry or dental hygiene. Facilities 
include a color television studio and graphic 
and photographic support areas for the devel- 
opment of media in a variety of formats. The 
departments staff is readily available for assis- 
; tance to the faculty in the design and develop- 
1 ment of independent learning materials for the 
dental curriculum, or for consultation regard- 
ing media applications in a variety of educa- 
tional settings. 

Consultation is also provided to the faculty 
in the areas of research design and statistics; 
test construction and analysis of results; and 
student, curriculum and program evaluation. 
The department also maintains the Inde- 
pendent Learning Center (ILC) which houses 
86 study carrels and three group study areas 
specifically for the use of self-instructional me- 
dia by students. The ILC is available for utiliza- 
tion from morning through early evening 
hours on weekdays and Saturdays, and pro- 
vides a spacious and comfortable atmosphere 
for independent study. 



Additionally, the department endeavors to 
provide the dental practitioner the opportunity 
to continue his education by making available a 
variety of instructional materials in an inde- 
pendent learning format. 

Endodontics 

Chairman: Henry J. Van Hassel 

Professor: Van Hassel 

Associate Professors: Hovland, Clem 

Associate Clinical Professor Schunick 

Assistant Professor. Dumsha 

Assistant Clinical Professors: Krzeminski, 

Quarantillo, Warren 
Clinical Instructors: Dellork, D'Orlando, Hahn, 

Henry, Jurist, Morales, Patterson, Russo, 

Zimet 

The student's introduction to endodontics be- 
gins in the second year as part of Basic Dental 
Science II. It consists of a series of lectures and 
laboratories which stress the fundamentals of 
root canal therapy. Upon successful completion 
of this course the student is ready to perform 
the same procedures on clinical patients who 
warrant this treatment. 

In the third year, lectures are presented 
which stress diagnosis and the integration of 
the biological aspects of endodontics into the 
clinical setting. Cases are treated clinically with 
the student demonstrating an acceptable level 
of mastery by the completion of the third year. 

The fourth-year experience in endodontics 
is primarily clinical. A mastery of clinical endo- 
dontics on more complex cases is expected of 
each student. 

ENDO 538. Principles of Clinical Endodontics 
(4) 
ENDO 548. Endodontic Clinic (4) 



22 



Fixed Restorative Dentistry 

Chairman: George F. Buchness 

Professor: Greeley 

Associate Professors: Buchness, Haroth, 

Thompson 
Associate Clinical Professor: Livaditis 
Assistant Professors: Bradbury, DiGianni, Gin- 

gell, Halpern, Holston, Nelson, Payne, 

Strassler, Tewes, ^Tiitaker, Williams, Wood 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Abraham, Ber- 

man, Fried, Iddings, J. Miller, T. Miller, 

VandenBosche, Zeller 
Clinical Instructors: Aiken, Burdick, Calvert. 

Davidson, Denisch, Dietrich, Evans, Ger- 

hardt, Greenbaum, Inge, Jones, Kedzierski, 

Mantzouranis-Rippeon, Revak, Ritter, Tate, 

Ward 
Associate Staff: Suls 

The scope of instruction in fixed restorative 
dentistry involves the art and science of replac- 
ing missing teeth and lost or diseased tooth 
structure with fixed (non-removable) restora- 
tions; the disciplines of operative dentistry and 
fixed partial prosthodontics are included. The 
undergraduate teaching program is integrated 
throughout the four-year curriculum. 

The Department of Fixed Restorative Den- 
tistry is reponsible for major segments of the 
courses in Basic Dental Science, in which stu- 
dents are introduced to fundamental principles, 
and develop the manual skills necessary for 
clinical treatment of patients. The first-year pro- 
gram includes methods and materials used to 
restore individual teeth, and an understanding 
of the destructive process of dental caries and 
the preventive aspects of restorative treatment. 
Second-year students are introduced to con- 
cepts and skills used in replacement of missing 
teeth with fixed partial prostheses. Instructional 
methodology includes lectures, television dem- 
onstrations, slide-tape instructional manual pro- 
grams and laboratory exercises on simulated 
human dentition. During the first two years, 
limited but increasing clinical patient treatment 
with close staff supervision augments and rein- 
forces the foundation provided. 



During the third and fourth years, didactic 
instruction and extensive clinical treatment with 
staff guidance facilitate the application and inte- 
gration of fundamentals of operative dentistry 
and fixed partial prosthodontics. The depart- 
ment also participates in the Conjoint Sciences 
program. 

FEXD 538. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (13) 
FEXD 548. Fixed Restorative Dentistry (15) 

Microbiology 

Chairman: William A Falkler, Jr. 

Professors: Krywolap, Hawley 

Associate Professors: Delisle, Falkler, Minah, 

Nauman, Suzuki, Sydiskis 
Assistant Professors: Lohr, Williams 
Associate Staff: Organ 

The Department of Microbiology offers under- 
graduate and graduate programs. The under- 
graduate program is organized to supply the 
student with the fundamental principles of mi- 
crobiology in order that he/she may under- 
stand the chemical and biological mechanisms 
of the production of disease by bacteria and 
other parasites, and the means by which the 
host protects itself against bacteria and related 
organisms. The graduate programs leading to- 
ward the degrees of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy are designed to train stu- 
dents for positions in research and teaching, 
particularly in dental schools. 
DMIC 512. Microbiology (5) 



Oral Diagnosis 

Chairman: C. Daniel Overholser 

Professor. Hasler 

Clinical Professor: Brotman 

Associate Professors: Aks, Kutcher, Overholser, 

Park, Peterson 
Associate Clinical Professors: Bloom, L. S. 

Levin 
Assistant Professors: Balciunas, DePaola, 

Meiller 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Katz, Lee, Van- 

dermer, Weiner 
Instructors: Siegel, Stansbury, Williams 
Clinical Instructors: Brooks, Brown, Christo- 
pher, Fine, Goldvarg, Howard, S. Levin, 
Shulman, Slotke, Tomney, Vaughn 
The curriculum in oral diagnosis includes the 
basic principles of the patient interview, the 
fundamentals of physical examination, recogni- 
tion of oral disease, and the management of 
patients with oral and/or systemic disease. 

Principles of Biomedicine, an interdiscipli- 
nary course taught in conjunction with the De- 
partment of Oral Pathology, introduces the sec- 
ond-year student to oral diagnosis through 
j didactic presentations concerning the patient 
j .interview, clinical examination, oral radiology, 
and treatment planning. Clinical aspects of the 
{course are introduced through Basic Dental 
| Science. 

Principles of oral diagnosis are taught in 
the third and fourth years clinically and didact- 
ically. These courses reinforce the concept that 
the dentist should receive adequate training in 
obtaining medical histories, performing appro- 
priate physical examinations, interpreting the 
results of various laboratory tests, and, most 
importantly, relating the physical status of the 
patient to the dental treatment plan. 
DPAT 528. Principles of Biomedicine (12) 
DPAT 538. Principles of Oral Diagnosis/Radiol- 
ogy (7) 

DPAT 548. Principles of Oral Diagnosis/Radiol- 
ogy (4) 




Oral Health Care Delivery 
Chairman: Leonard A Cohen 
Associate Professors: Cohen, Morganstein 
Associate Clinical Professors: Shulman, Snyder 
Assistant Professors: Belenky, Bowman, Colan- 
gelo, Dana, Eldridge, Indyke, Kushner, 
Long, Serio, Soble, Williams 
Assistant Clinical Professors: Bosmajian, Di- 

Nardo, Llewellyn, Peltzman, Streckfus 
Instructors: LaBelle, Rullman 
Clinical Instructors: Elggren, Epstein, Hanson, 
Lusk, Mann, Oblinger, Pusin, Sheer, Silver- 
man, Strahl 
In its teaching, research and s